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Sumac Chicken Kebabs

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Sumac Chicken Kebabs

4 Chicken Breats Cubed
3 tsp Sumac
Zest of one Lemon chopped
4 Garlic Cloves chopped
1/4 cup of good Oil
S&P

Mix all marinade ingridients in a bowl. Add chicken a cover with marinade. Marinade for minimum 1 hour, best over night.
Thread onto skewers and cook over a high heat, until Chicken is cooked through.

Edited by Smokin Monkey - 10/29/16 at 3:10am
post #2 of 15
Sounds interesting. Video isn't working, at least not working using the mobile site.
post #3 of 15

Sounds great!

 

No video here either!

 

Al

post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

Sounds interesting. Video isn't working, at least not working using the mobile site.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinAl View Post

Sounds great!

No video here either!

Al

Video up and running.
post #5 of 15
Looks great,you forgot to mention the shrimp!drool.gif
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by b-one View Post

Looks great,you forgot to mention the shrimp!drool.gif

Haha, Was only there to fill the carousel! I do not eat Seafood.!
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokin Monkey View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by b-one View Post

Looks great,you forgot to mention the shrimp!drool.gif

Haha, Was only there to fill the carousel! I do not eat Seafood.!

I'll take the shrimp!icon14.gif
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by b-one View Post

I'll take the shrimp!icon14.gif

Sorry, wife was eating them off the skewer!
post #9 of 15

I like it!   Soon I'll  be getting more into the spinning kabob world and I can't wait!

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokin Monkey View Post

Sumac Chicken Kebabs

4 Chicken Breats Cubed
3 tsp Sumac
Zest of one Lemon chopped
4 Garlic Cloves chopped
1/4 cup of good Oil
S&P

Mix all marinade ingridients in a bowl. Add chicken a cover with marinade. Marinade for minimum 1 hour, best over night.
Thread onto skewers and cook over a high heat, until Chicken is cooked through.

 

Looks greatThumbs Up.

Just for clarification- the sumac you have in your recipe is not the same as the staghorn sumac we have in the states, which is a potent skin irritant, correct?

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffcarter View Post

Looks greatThumbs Up .
Just for clarification- the sumac you have in your recipe is not the same as the staghorn sumac we have in the states, which is a potent skin irritant, correct?


Glad you skied. I was about to. I'm not allergic to it but I've never eaten it either.
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffcarter View Post

Looks greatThumbs Up .
Just for clarification- the sumac you have in your recipe is not the same as the staghorn sumac we have in the states, which is a potent skin irritant, correct?

Did not know this.

This is the official description on Sumac.

Sumac is a decorative bush that grows wild throughout the Middle East and parts of Italy. The dark purple-red berries are sold dried or ground and have a fruity, astringent taste. The Sicilian sumac and those berries grown at the highest latitude are said to be the best flavored of the sumacs. The berries are picked just before they ripen and dried. Sumac is used in the cooking of Lebanon, Syria, Turkey and Iran. Ground sumac is rubbed into meats for grilling and is good with potatoes, beets, and in mixed bean salads. Whole, cracked or ground sumac berries are also used to make a fruity, sour culinary juice which can be added to marinades, salad dressings, sauces and yogurt. This is made by soaking the berries 15-20 minutes in warm water, squeezing the berries to get all the flavor, and then straining the liquid. The juice can be added to food at the end of cooking. Crushed dried sumac is called somagh.


Hope this helps.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokin Monkey View Post


Did not know this.

This is the official description on Sumac.

Sumac is a decorative bush that grows wild throughout the Middle East and parts of Italy. The dark purple-red berries are sold dried or ground and have a fruity, astringent taste. The Sicilian sumac and those berries grown at the highest latitude are said to be the best flavored of the sumacs. The berries are picked just before they ripen and dried. Sumac is used in the cooking of Lebanon, Syria, Turkey and Iran. Ground sumac is rubbed into meats for grilling and is good with potatoes, beets, and in mixed bean salads. Whole, cracked or ground sumac berries are also used to make a fruity, sour culinary juice which can be added to marinades, salad dressings, sauces and yogurt. This is made by soaking the berries 15-20 minutes in warm water, squeezing the berries to get all the flavor, and then straining the liquid. The juice can be added to food at the end of cooking. Crushed dried sumac is called somagh.


Hope this helps.


Yes, thanks.

post #14 of 15

Did a really quick look and evidently there are 35 varieties of Sumac.  Also learned (according to the internet) the Sumac we have in OK is not poison.  In-fact (according to the internet) Poison Sumac doesn't grow here.  Now I'm really confused and will have to do some more research. (sigh)

post #15 of 15

I love to see something different. Nice!

 

Disco

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