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TombruceUK - WSM questions

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Toms original post

Originally Posted by tombruceuk View Post

The weber fuel, if that's the brand you have, is actually very good. 

I've read that Big K is good but I've never tried it, you need restaurant grade. 

My latest batch is from the london log co and seems to be very good. 


Obviously it depends on where you live. Move of the better brands can only be purchased in bulk as they are sold trade only but let me know if you find anything that works. 


I'd be interested to hear if the gaskets make a difference, heard mixed reviews. Some say that the seals are lose to allow a little airflow and to reduce the heat. 

I used my WSM as a grill for the first time over the weekend and immediately noticed the temperature difference by removing the water bowl. Keep it in for smoking IMO. It took 16lb of pork shoulder 7 hours to reach 65 degrees, it's a low and slow cook don't forget. 



Hi Tom


The weber fuel will be fine. Are you using the charcoal or the briquettes? I would suggest you use the briquettes in the WSM. Yes use restaurant grade if you can get it - the main reason is that it is made entirely from hardwood whereas the cheaper charcoal is made from whatever they can source in bulk.

You can get BigK restaurant grade briquettes and charcoal in small quantities from places like

Nisbets http://www.nisbets.co.uk/2/Consumables-Catering-Disposables-Barbecue-Briquettes/c01c02a5702.r12.1

or ChefsRange http://www.nisbets.co.uk/2/Consumables-Catering-Disposables-Barbecue-Briquettes/c01c02a5702.r12.1

or Amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk/Restaurant-Hardwood-Lumpwood-Charcoal-Barbecues/dp/B00F1LXSX4

I usually just use Heat Beads though from somewhere like WOWBBQ http://www.wowbbq.co.uk/products/aussie-heat-beads-4kg--1009.html


With the WSM the seals are usually fine when the units are new. They can leak though if the doors are abused and they may loosen up with age. When/if this happens a gasket will help but you should not need them from new. This tends to be more of a problem with the cheaper brands like the ProQ.

Edited by Wade - 4/6/16 at 2:19am
post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 
Originally Posted by tombruceuk View Post

It took 16lb of pork shoulder 7 hours to reach 65 degrees, it's a low and slow cook don't forget. 


How did the pork pull at 65 degrees C? I usually find it quite tough to pull at that temperature. I usually take mine up to about 85 C (or even slightly higher) before I pull it.

post #3 of 7

Hi Wade. 

I didn't pull at 65 degrees, I usually foil it then and wait for it to reach 89. On this occasion I was smoking overnight and it reached 100 degrees by the time I checked. Doesn't appear to have caused any problems, I've had it for lunch and dinner for the last few days and I'm still here. 


Do you foil? I am tempted to leave it uncovered next time for a couple of reasons. 

1 - Ease, no worrying about monitoring the temperature, I could leave it going for the full 16 hours. 

2 - Does it give a better bark? 


I tried pork belly in my smoker and regretted it, without grilling I couldn't get crispy fat. Changing the WSM from indirect to direct heat during a cook is going to be a pain. 


Any thoughts?




PS - apologies if I'm replying to the wrong thread again :-) 

post #4 of 7
I foil my pork, and add some Apple Juice, tends to keep it moist.

I do Belly Pork most weekends, you will not get Crackiling cooking it low and slow.
I either remove and get heat up high and place Crackling side down, or place under a hot grill.

I am thinking of doing a whole Pork Belly at the smokers weekend.
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

When cooking in the Weber I have always foiled after the first 3 or 4 hours, however when I cook in the pellet smoker I don't. There is a difference - you do get a slightly dryer end result if you do not foil - but to be honest I cannot say that I prefer one over the other. It is really down to personal taste.


Steve's day job during the summer is hog roasting in its various forms. If there was any way of getting crispy crackling whilst cooking low and slow he would have found it my now... I take the skin off mine before I cook and, as Steve suggested, I rub it with oil and salt and cook it in a hot oven separately from the pork joint.

post #6 of 7
Cook pigs low and slow over 10 hours. Skin hardens but not crispy, you have to turn both burners up to maximum for about 15 minutes to get skin to crisp and what I call blow. Looks like pork scratching! Have to keep a close eye on it though, can crackle and burn with in minutes.
post #7 of 7

thanks for the tips guys! 

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