or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Sausage › summer sausage turning brown inside after slicing????
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

summer sausage turning brown inside after slicing????

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ive been smoking my own deer summer sausage for a while know and always had good results. This year I did everything the same except I used pork callies instead of pork butts to mix with my deer meat( was much more fat). Anyway after using same procedure for smoking as I normally do, I removed SS at internal temp of 155 degrees, Looked good tasted great, but I could tell there was more pork fat than normal. Slightly different texture but still really good. Next day I sliced up a stick and threw it in a plastic zip loc and put in fridge. Then next day I got some out to snack on and noticed the inside of the SS was turning a greyish color around the high temp cheese that I put in it. Still smelt good, and tasted good. Day after that even more grey on inside of slices, still tastes and smells good. So my main question is, what is causing the grey color, just looks cosmeticaly bad to the eye. Has anyone seen this before?? My friend told be sometimes this happens but does not know why.  I just finished a second 50lb batch, but used pork butts-and no grey on inside of them after slicing.  Did the more pork fat cause some chemical issue or something???  Any comments much welcomed...

post #2 of 12

There is no reason a Picnic Shoulder should react different than a Butt. This situation is a new one to me, sorry I can't be more help. Maybe one of the guys that makes more Summer Sausage has had this experience...JJ

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ya just to clarify, when I first cut open a stick it looked fine. but after slicing and throwing in fridge, the next day is when I noticed the color change to a greyish only around the cheese and then it starts to spread across the entire slice after after a few days. I dont know if it is a oxygen thing, or a ph, moisture, chemical reaction. But it still taste really good. The texture is fine, looks normal, not slimy or anything, just a little bit more greasy, kind of like sliced pepperoni. Should i be worried about eating it or not??

post #4 of 12

If you are confident the IT got uniformly above 150°F, there should be no Safety issue. Was this a different Cheese than usual? A chem reaction is possible but I don't know of any toxic result from fat and cheese contact...Send a couple of Sticks for a more in depth analysis. I am a professional...JJ:439: 

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

I am positive internal temp was 155 when i removed it. The high temp cheese, cure and seasoning was all the same, bought at local meat shop, was suppose to be all fresh. The only thing I changed on this 50 lb batch was i used pork callies instead of pork butts. In my opinion the pork callies were almost all fat. But I am still learning.  The following week I did another 50lb batch same recipe, seasoning, cheese, smoker and technique but used pork butts like normal. No greying on this batch after slicing. This was the first time I use callies, so I automatically thought since that was the only thing changed it might be the culprit... Was just hoping to get some input from more experienced sausage makers out there.

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Here is a picture. this pic makes it really look bad. IMG_20160107_103842183.jpg 897k .jpg file  

post #7 of 12

100 Pounds in 2 weeks !?! You must be a Big Fan. :biggrin:  

 

I did a search on Cheese and Fat Oxidizing. There is nothing out there but did find the info below...The Cure should have stopped this...JJ

 

http://shelflifeadvice.com/faq/what-oxidation-and-how-does-it-alter-food-products

 

Aug 21, 2009

By Susan Brewer, Ph.D.
University of Illinois, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
 
Oxidation is a reaction that takes place when oxygen has access to products containing fat or pigments. If fats oxidize, they produce “off” odors and flavors (stale, rancid odors). Often, if fats oxidize, vitamins also oxidize and lose their activity. If pigments oxidize, they can change color completely. For example, red meat turns gray when the myoglobin pigment oxidizes. In this case, the product is not unsafe; it just looks less appealing. Wrapping some food products in a wrap that limits oxidation (such as Saran Wrap) will help to keep them fresh.
 
Source(s):
Susan Brewer, Ph.D, University of Illinois, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
 

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
post #9 of 12

Light and oxidation can turn the meat slices a gray color.  If the chub interior, on a fresh slice, is still a nice pinkish color, no issues at all.

 

When the cured meat is exposed to light and oxygen it creates metmyoglobin nitrite and starts turning the exposed surface a gray color.  Still safe to eat, just not as pretty.

post #10 of 12

Looks like JJ and I are in tune today.  :biggrin:

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrankyBuzzard View Post
 

Light and oxidation can turn the meat slices a gray color.  If the chub interior, on a fresh slice, is still a nice pinkish color, no issues at all.

 

When the cured meat is exposed to light and oxygen it creates metmyoglobin nitrite and starts turning the exposed surface a gray color.  Still safe to eat, just not as pretty.

yeahthat.gif

 

What CB and JJ said.

 

Bear

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ok I feel better now.,, ya a 100 lbs usually last me a year, but i give alot away to friends to.  I guess the more fat gave me a over all lighter colored summer sausage( about like bolonga) and I can notice the color change more. In other batchs the over all color alot darker when done.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sausage
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Sausage › summer sausage turning brown inside after slicing????