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BUTTS !

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

So last weekend I did my second round of pork BUTTS, this time with bone in. I followed a different process, and the results were outstanding. However, I can always do better so I have a question. Here is what I did:

 

I got 2 9lb butts from the meat store for under $1 per pound ! Bone in, great looking and smelling BUTTS LOL (I always smell the meat). I hit them with some mustard and dry rub and put them in the fridge overnight. Fired up the WSM at 545am the next day and smoked the butts at 225-250 until they hit 155. Then I hit them with the crutch. The internal temp came up to 200 in a few hours, so I unwrapped them and wow was there a lot of juice in there. Put the butts back on the smoker to firm up the bark. The internal temp dropped pretty quick, and after 1 hour I pulled them off the WSM and foiled them for about another half hour. The bone just popped right out of the butt (im laughing as I type this of course), and the bear claws tore those butts up in no time. It was very tasty with a great smoke ring. 

 

My question is what is the post crutch process? I never got the bark to firm back up, even cranked up the temp to 275 and it never got to that crunchy bark like when I did the butts the first time (again laughing). I liked the crutch simply because it took the total time down to about 12 hours vs the non-crutch which was +16 hours. Need some advice so I can do better butts (laughing yet again)!

post #2 of 7
I don't have an answer to your particular question, but I have a suggestion which will make the question unnecessary.
Get your smoker up between 300° and 325°. Check the meat at about six and a half hours, you're looking for a center mass temperature of 195°-200°. It should be close at 6.5 hours, but it might take 7 or so. No need for foil during the smoking process. Once it hits the desired temperature and tenderness, wrap it in foil and allow to rest for at least an hour. Then pull it. You'll have a nice crispy bark, moist tender meat, and several extra hours of your life to do other things.
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by badjujumatt View Post
 

...great looking and smelling BUTTS LOL (I always smell the meat)...

 

The bone just popped right out of the butt (im laughing as I type this of course), and the bear claws tore those butts up in no time.

 

It was very tasty with a great smoke ring. 

 

Need some advice so I can do better butts (laughing yet again)!

 

worthless.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry, I couldn't stop myself... :icon_eek: 

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sfprankster View Post
 

 

worthless.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry, I couldn't stop myself... :icon_eek: 

 

Well I can fix that right now sir LOL!

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdboatbum View Post

I don't have an answer to your particular question, but I have a suggestion which will make the question unnecessary.
Get your smoker up between 300° and 325°. Check the meat at about six and a half hours, you're looking for a center mass temperature of 195°-200°. It should be close at 6.5 hours, but it might take 7 or so. No need for foil during the smoking process. Once it hits the desired temperature and tenderness, wrap it in foil and allow to rest for at least an hour. Then pull it. You'll have a nice crispy bark, moist tender meat, and several extra hours of your life to do other things.

 

 

What about low and slow???? I thought the fun with the butts is taking your time....:drool:

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by badjujumatt View Post


I liked the crutch simply because it took the total time down to about 12 hours vs the non-crutch which was +16 hours. Need some advice so I can do better butts (laughing yet again)!

Quote:
Originally Posted by badjujumatt View Post


What about low and slow???? I thought the fun with the butts is taking your time....drool.gif:
From reading your first post I got the impression you were interested not only in preserving the bark but also in cutting down the overall cook time. I simply shared my favorite method, which happens to address both issues.