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1st time rib roast

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I am making a boneless rib roast on my WSM 22 for the first time. I have followed Meathead's recipe step by step. After only 2 hours, the meat is at 100. It is approximately 12 Lbs. The smoker has run solid between 230 and 240. I am seriously worried. Dinner is not until six. I had figured at least five hours. Does a rib roast have a stall like other cuts of meat? I sure hope so. Any advice welcome and very appreciated.

post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by maloff28 View Post
 

I am making a boneless rib roast on my WSM 22 for the first time. I have followed Meathead's recipe step by step. After only 2 hours, the meat is at 100. It is approximately 12 Lbs. The smoker has run solid between 230 and 240. I am seriously worried. Dinner is not until six. I had figured at least five hours. Does a rib roast have a stall like other cuts of meat? I sure hope so. Any advice welcome and very appreciated.

 

Don't get alarmed----There shouldn't be a stall in a Rib Roast only going to 140° or so IT.

 

However if you're done a little bit or a couple hours too early, just wrap it in foil, then in a towel, and put it in a dry cooler. Pack it tight with more towels. That should hold it until your 6:00 Dinner. If you can you could back your heat down to 220°. That's often where I do my Prime Rib at.

 

 

Bear

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 


Thanks Bear. I did back down the smoker temperature, but I guess this was one pampered cow... it just keeps going up.

Was going to do a reverse sear, but wasn't sure whether to do it before or after the rest.

post #4 of 14
If you are going to reverse sear I typically do that after the roast is sliced. If that's your goal if pull that roast at 120. Let it rest then slice and sear each steak tight before serving to order per what your guests want.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by maloff28 View Post
 


Thanks Bear. I did back down the smoker temperature, but I guess this was one pampered cow... it just keeps going up.

Was going to do a reverse sear, but wasn't sure whether to do it before or after the rest.

 

I had them already look like they were going to finish too early, so I made adjustments. Then I ended up nearly not done in time.

 

That's why that "towels & cooler" thing is a big help.

 

If you don't have a cooler handy, you can use the towels in your Microwave, just so you crowd the foiled meat with the towels to keep air from letting it cool.

BTW: Make sure nobody turns the Nukulater on.

 

 

Bear

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 

 

I had them already look like they were going to finish too early, so I made adjustments. Then I ended up nearly not done in time.

 

That's why that "towels & cooler" thing is a big help.

 

If you don't have a cooler handy, you can use the towels in your Microwave, just so you crowd the foiled meat with the towels to keep air from letting it cool.

BTW: Make sure nobody turns the Nukulater on.

 

 

Bear

 

 

Yep yep.  You can make all sorts of adjustments.   I've had cases where the dinner was supposed to be at 5 o'clock, and the PR was right on schedule, only to have dinner time pushed back to 8 o'clock.     There's a number of different adjustments that you can make, depending on the circumstances.    You can slow down the cook by lowering the chamber temp.   Danger here is that you might not finish in time due to the lower temps.    Just watch carefully and if need be, ramp the chamber temp back up.     Also, as noted, you can let it finish then hold it in a cooler.

 

If you are opting for a reverse sear, do it after the rest or the holding period.   

post #7 of 14

BTW, should add that while the PR doesn't have a "stall", the rate of the rise in temp will slow down.   For example, your PR went from ~40 to 100 in 2 hours, and increase of 60 degrees at a rate of 30 degrees per hour.    This doesn't mean that it will go from 100 to 130 in one more hour, then 130 to 160 the following hour.   The rate of increase WILL slow down even if you don't lower the chamber temp.    Obviously, reducing chamber temp will slow the rate even more.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Demosthenes9 View Post
 

BTW, should add that while the PR doesn't have a "stall", the rate of the rise in temp will slow down.   For example, your PR went from ~40 to 100 in 2 hours, and increase of 60 degrees at a rate of 30 degrees per hour.    This doesn't mean that it will go from 100 to 130 in one more hour, then 130 to 160 the following hour.   The rate of increase WILL slow down even if you don't lower the chamber temp.    Obviously, reducing chamber temp will slow the rate even more.

 

 

yeahthat.gif

 

Good point !!

 

That's why I keep records of what my IT is at various times in the smoke, so if need be, I can up the heat, or cut it back.

 

 

Bear

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the help. It came out great!

yahoo.gif
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by maloff28 View Post

Thanks for all the help. It came out great!

yahoo.gif

 

 

That looks awesome!!!!   Tell us about the last part of your cook ?  

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Demosthenes9 View Post
 

That looks awesome!!!!   Tell us about the last part of your cook ?  

 

 

yeahthat.gif

 

And how was the final timing?----Any cooler time?

 

 

Bear

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Sorry... Now for the details. Dinner was to be served at 6:30 but I needed to be done cooking by 6.
It was 12 lbs trimmed and nearly 5" in diameter so I figured 5-6 hours leaving extra time for any funny stuff.
I put it on at 11:30. Smoker held nicely between 230 and 240. It had reached 130 degrees by 3 pm. I had to take it off at that point. I foiled and put in the cooler wrapped with towels. Took it out at 5:45 for a sear on the grill and my mistake was not putting it back in the cooler after the sear or skipping the sear altogether. I say mistake only because I think it would have been a bit warmer when I served it.
Don't get me wrong... It was absolutely delicious and perfectly done for my taste, just could have been a little hotter is all. i learned a lot as I always do when I try something new AND when I ask questions of this incredible group.
Thanks again for all of your help!
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Oh... And a little more q-view







post #14 of 14

Looks Fantastic Maloff !!-------------------:points:

 

Perfect color!!:drool

 

That is a problem with Prime Rib, no matter if you cooler it for an hour or 2, or even just tent it for 15 minutes before serving. After all, it was only 130° or 140° to begin with.

Unless you have one of those heated plates to serve it on, it will be cold before anyone is half done with their serving.

 

That reminds me, I gotta look into getting a couple of those heated plates----Anybody have any suggestions???

 

I hate Cold food that's supposed to be hot !!!

 

 

Bear

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