or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Cold Smoking › Bacon › Bacon (Hot Smoking)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bacon (Hot Smoking)

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

 bout peppered bacon and putting the pepper on the bacon before i get the pillicle but someone asked me the other day can i do a maple syrup and peppered bacon combo now atm i already have the cure on the bacon going just brown sugar and salt equals amounts of both 


so my question is can i put maple syrup and pepper on it before i put in the smoker after i get the pellicule on it ?? 

post #2 of 14

You bet. If you are dry curing you can put it on right now.

Happy smoken.

David

post #3 of 14

When I do maple bacon, I put it one while pellicle is forming and squirt a little in the vac-seal bag when I'm bagging the bacon.

post #4 of 14

I tried putting Maple Syrup in my dry curing bags, and found very little results. It seemed like a waste of good Maple Syrup.

 

I didn't want my Bacon all sticky & easy to burn, so I didn't add any before or after pellicle.

 

The only things I do is Brown Sugar with the TQ when curing, and then CBP, Garlic Powder, and Onion Powder, after rinsing & drying, before getting the Pellicle.

 

If I really wanted Maple Flavor, I think I would add Maple Sugar during curing instead of Brown Sugar, and maybe a light sprinkling of Maple Sugar with the CBP, Garlic Powder & Onion Powder, during the Pellicle forming.

 

 

Bear

post #5 of 14

I use maple syrup during the cure and the smoke on almost every bacon project; the family loves it.  I recently discovered that if I fry the bacon at low temperatures the sugars will not caramelize too early, the bacon does not get sticky, and the flavor is over the top.  It takes a little longer, but its worth the wait!!

post #6 of 14

I use this as well, mixed 50-50 with water in a spray mister, gives a nice flavor to the bacon after smoking

 

http://alliedkenco.com/ingredient-mapleflavor.aspx

post #7 of 14

If you want that maple taste, add maple extract to the brine. Your nose trumps your mouth, you taste what you smell.  If your mind smells it, your tongue tastes it.

 

Also you might want to dig around in search for Disco's maple bacon. he's been experimenting with injecting it with a smal amount of brine directing into the meat. His last try he was really happy with.

 

Also a Disco idea, he cut back the sugar and uses molasses, he says he gets less burnage cooking his bacon that way with a really good flavor also.

 

Just some ideas.

 

PS..... <Chuckles> the above works with brine cures. Have you tryed the crystalized maple sugar?

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

i cant find maple sugar in Australia and its annoying cos if i want it the postage is crazy on alot of things 

but im just not sure if i should put the mmaple syrup and pepper on before or after getting the pellicle i could put some maple syrup on before the pellicle with pepper and then before it goes in the smmoker just rubb a little more on it 

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattOZ View Post
 

i cant find maple sugar in Australia and its annoying cos if i want it the postage is crazy on alot of things 

but im just not sure if i should put the mmaple syrup and pepper on before or after getting the pellicle i could put some maple syrup on before the pellicle with pepper and then before it goes in the smmoker just rubb a little more on it 

 

The dry types of Maple flavorings would be best put on before the Pellicle. IMHO

However since Maple Syrup may keep the Bacon from absorbing the smoke, and you don't care if it's sticky, you may want to put some Maple Syrup in with the Bacon when you Vacuum seal it, like "rexter" mentioned above.

 

 

Bear

post #10 of 14
May i ask what is pellicle,and why is it important
I am just starting to smoke Bacon,and I wish to do it properly
I would hate for someone to get sick because I messed up
post #11 of 14

Pellicle (cooking)

 

A pellicle is a skin or coating of proteins on the surface of meat, fish or poultry, which allow smoke to better adhere the surface of the meat during the smoking process. Useful in all smoking applications and with any kind of animal protein, it is best used with fish where the flesh of, say, salmon, forms a pellicle, the surface that will attract more smoke to adhere to it than would be the case if you had not used it. Without a pellicle; the fish would be inedibly dry from enough smoking to produce a tasty finished product. It is the pellicle which permits the transformation creating delectable smoked salmon.

Pellicle formation

Before cured foods are smoked, they should be allowed to air-dry long enough to form a tacky skin, known as a pellicle. The pellicle plays a key role in producing excellent smoked items. It acts as a kind of protective barrier for the food, and also plays an important role in capturing the smoke’s flavor and color.

Most foods can be properly dried by placing them on racks or by hanging them on hooks or sticks. It is important that air be able to flow around all sides. They should be air-dried uncovered, in the refrigerator or a cool room. To encourage pellicle formation, you can place the foods so that a fan blows air over them. The exterior of the item must be sufficiently dry if the smoke is to adhere.

 

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pellicle_(cooking)

post #12 of 14

Wikipedia: A pellicle is a skin or coating of proteins on the surface of meat, fish or poultry, which allow smoke to better adhere the surface of the meat during the smoking process. Useful in all smoking applications and with any kind of animal protein, it is best used with fish where the flesh of, say, salmon, forms a pellicle, the surface that will attract more smoke to adhere to it than would be the case if you had not used it. Without a pellicle; the fish would be inedibly dry from enough smoking to produce a tasty finished product. It is the pellicle which permits the transformation creating delectable smoked salmon.Bett

 

Better than I could describe it

After curing and soaking (dry cure) I put my pork bellies out on a table with a fan blowing on them. It's a little faster than without. Put your pepper or other seasonings on then under a fan or just air dry. You'll know it when the meat's no longer wet and there's a slight stickiness to the surface of the meat. Don't forget you have to do both sides.

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamheart View Post
 

If you want that maple taste, add maple extract to the brine. Your nose trumps your mouth, you taste what you smell.  If your mind smells it, your tongue tastes it.

 

Also you might want to dig around in search for Disco's maple bacon. he's been experimenting with injecting it with a smal amount of brine directing into the meat. His last try he was really happy with.

 

Also a Disco idea, he cut back the sugar and uses molasses, he says he gets less burnage cooking his bacon that way with a really good flavor also.

 

Just some ideas.

 

PS..... <Chuckles> the above works with brine cures. Have you tryed the crystalized maple sugar?

No, you taste sweet, sour, bitter, salty & umami. Everything else is smell.

post #14 of 14
Thank you very much,some of the technical terms are hard to remember
I have always have known it as tacky
Im hoping my first attempt at smoked bacon turns out as well as everything else I have done
Blair.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Bacon
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Cold Smoking › Bacon › Bacon (Hot Smoking)