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Advice on This Used Horizon - Rust

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Need some help. Looking at this horizon. I know that the horizon smokers are high quality. Is this rust is manageable and/or should I be concerned? Will be my first offset so not sure how much rust is normal on this type of smoker. Need to decide today so any help is appreciated. I can't see it in person without driving a long way.




post #2 of 17

It does not look too bad. Usually they are true quarter inch thick so you should be able to wire brush it good before laying a little paint on it. Smoker like that could stand a little cleaning and painting each year and should work well for years to come. Of course it's all about the price though?

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I think the price is ok ($350). I don't think here is much rust on inside of chamber, but if so, would still be able to paint it. Is there a certain kind of high temp that should be used for these?
post #4 of 17

Rustoleum makes a high-temp BBQ paint you can pick up at WalMart.

 

VHT makes high-temp paint for automotive applications. Good stuff. And, you can get them in different colors. http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_7_3?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=vht%20engine%20paint&sprefix=vht%2Caps%2C313

 

http://www.vhtpaint.com/products/flameproof/

post #5 of 17

I have a rusty FB as well and from all that I have been able to determine, the Rustoleum paint isn't good for the FB because of the temps it can get to.  Go for the VHT paint as it will hold up to 2000 degrees.

post #6 of 17

I'd buy it for $350. If you never painted it that 1/4" steel would still last years.

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

Well, I brought her home.  She's a beaut.  Quick question...and potentially a silly one at best.  What kind of wired brush should i be using on this?  Stainless?  Copper? Does it matter?

post #8 of 17

I'd get a twisted cup brush from Lowe's or the like to save time.  If you do it with elbow grease, probably a stiff steel brush would be most aggressive.  A brass brush just won't have the stiffness to clean the rust up.  After you have thoroughly wire brushed it, spray some brake parts cleaner on it to remove dust and oils before you spray the paint.  

post #9 of 17

U can also use some small grit sand paper as well.  Just make sure you clean off the dust/oils and any other dirt before you paint. 

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Anyone ever use this to clean up surface rust? Good? Bad
post #11 of 17

I believe that will work just fine .  congrats on your purchase, its a good one !

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

Inside the smoker, there are layers of "stuff" (not sure what to call it) cooked onto the metal.  Probably years' worth.  But, it is fairly brittle and it breaks/scrapes off fairly easily with a scotch brite pad.  I can see some orange poking through in various spots throughout the chamber.  Is my best bet to strip the layers of "stuff" and clean down to bare metal throughout the entire chamber, then just re-season from scratch?  I don't know the history of this smoker, other than i'm the 3rd owner and it is about 5-6 years old.  I do know the 2nd owner put little or no time into maintenance, and i'm certain he didn't season it.  He probably only cooked on it 1 or 2 times max.  I have no idea how, or when the pit was seasoned.  Not sure what is better...leave it as is or clean/re-season.  I'm not sure what a properly seasoned pit is supposed to look like.  Any advice is helpful!!

Jeff

post #13 of 17

I can tell you what I'd do if it were mine.

 

I'd brine two large chickens.

 

Then I'd pressure wash it inside and out (grates and all), touch up exterior rust with #3 steel wool (in paint dept. at WalMart) and some hi-temp paint. Spray the interior of the smoker only; not the firebox, with spray canola or vegetable oil (they sell it in most grocery stores) and load her up with wood or charcoal and take it up to 250 for an hour, then to 350 til the coals burned out.

 

Then I'd spachcock the chickens and apply rub, re-fire the grill and bring it up to 325, place the chickens on the grate over a pan of water and bring them to an IT of 165 degrees and take them into the house and eat.

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grillmonkey View Post
 

I can tell you what I'd do if it were mine.

 

I'd brine two large chickens.

 

Then I'd pressure wash it inside and out (grates and all), touch up exterior rust with #3 steel wool (in paint dept. at WalMart) and some hi-temp paint. Spray the interior of the smoker only; not the firebox, with spray canola or vegetable oil (they sell it in most grocery stores) and load her up with wood or charcoal and take it up to 250 for an hour, then to 350 til the coals burned out.

 

Then I'd spachcock the chickens and apply rub, re-fire the grill and bring it up to 325, place the chickens on the grate over a pan of water and bring them to an IT of 165 degrees and take them into the house and eat.

Thanks!  Why would you not oil the inside of the firebox?  Isn't is prone to rust just like the smoke chamber?

post #15 of 17

Too hot. It would burn the oil away and serve no purpose.

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
So how do I slow down rust development inside the firebox? I don't and just let it be?
post #17 of 17

If the firebox interior is rusted, RustOleum BBQ & Stove paint is probably your best bet. If you're going to pressure wash, do the interior of the firebox also. If there is rust present after it dries, rough sand with 180 grit sand paper, wipe out dust with a wet rag and paint. Follow directions on paint can for dry times and burn it in with charcoal or wood.

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