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Kitchen knives - Page 2

post #21 of 39

I recently got fed up with the faberware knives my wife has. So I bought a Wusthof Classic Hollow-Ground Santoku on Amazon.

 

This knife is wicked sharp! Worth every penny so far.

 

You need to get the Santoku sharpener though since the sharpening angle is different then western knives.

 

I plan to buy the rest of the knives one by one until I have a whole set.

post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pops6927 View Post

I was a professional meat cutter for 35 years and we used 'practical' knives - 6" straight or curved - stiff or flexible - stainless steel (only thing allowed in meat shops now).  Different brands.  I prefer Dexter, Chicago, Victorinox.  I get my knives either at  Ace Mart or Bunzl Koch.

www.acemart.com

www.kochsupplies.com

Be sure to ask for a catalog and get on their mailing lists!

They have a wide variety to choose from.

For knife sharpeners I use Work Sharp.

This. You guys are wasting money on "pretty knives with pretty names" go to the restaurant supply place and but a few Dexter white handled knives. Don't look at what TV chefs use, look at what really chefs use. We use restaurant supply knives at every restaurant and market I've ever worked at.
post #23 of 39

i really must agree with restaurant style knives, the only reason I tend to use german style knives is because I like the feel/ weight. my filet and butchering stuff all have white handles and keep a great edge.

post #24 of 39

There are many kitchen knives which are used extensively in kitchen. Some of the names are Wusthoff, Lamson Santoku Knife.

post #25 of 39

As far as kitchen knives go, unless you are talking custom, the best resource for knives in any price range can be found here http://www.chefknivestogo.com/

 

Also, a full line of sharpening stones, and some sharpening guides.

post #26 of 39

Mdboatbum, I got so caught up watching Julia Childs, I forgot I was searching for knife info,  LOL

 

What a lady!  

 

She, and Justin Wilson taught us how to cook.

They started, what Food Network originally, tried to attain, bur failed at, and You Tube still can't compare to. 

Today it is food-stars and completion's, which no one can learn anything from.

 

Food Network started out in the right direction, with some very good cooking  and teaching shows.

But for the life of me, I can't figure out why, they cut almost all "real" cooking shows, where you could actually learn something, and went to competition crap shows.  The only cooking shows on Food Network anymore are all re-runs, that we've seen way too many times.

post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by fpmich View Post

Mdboatbum, I got so caught up watching Julia Childs, I forgot I was searching for knife info,  LOL

What a lady!  

She, and Justin Wilson taught us how to cook.
They started, what Food Network originally, tried to attain, bur failed at, and You Tube still can't compare to. 
Today it is food-stars and completion's, which no one can learn anything from.

Food Network started out in the right direction, with some very good cooking  and teaching shows.
But for the life of me, I can't figure out why, they cut almost all "real" cooking shows, where you could actually learn something, and went to competition crap shows.  The only cooking shows on Food Network anymore are all re-runs, that we've seen way too many times.

I couldn't agree more. My guess is that the competition shows must be cheaper to produce somehow, though that's only a guess. The old "stand and stir" shows from the likes of Julia Child, Graham Kerr, Jeff Smith and Stephen Yan on PBS really got people interested in cooking. They'd see the show, take notes then run to the store for the ingredients. Nowadays, it's just a spectator sport. The Cooking Channel seemed like it was trying to get back to what the Food Network once was, but I'm not sure if it succeeded. We gave up cable over a year ago and, aside from the 24 hour IV news feeds, I honestly can't think of much that I miss.
post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pops6927 View Post

I was a professional meat cutter for 35 years and we used 'practical' knives - 6" straight or curved - stiff or flexible - stainless steel (only thing allowed in meat shops now).  Different brands.  I prefer Dexter, Chicago, Victorinox.  I get my knives either at  Ace Mart or Bunzl Koch.

www.acemart.com

www.kochsupplies.com

Be sure to ask for a catalog and get on their mailing lists!

They have a wide variety to choose from.

For knife sharpeners I use Work Sharp.
I'm with Pop's!! I love my Dexter knives. They aren't expensive but definitely not cheap either. They keep a good edge and sharpen pretty easily.
post #29 of 39
I recently heard about Mercer Culinary Renaissance knives. Anybody have any experience with them? The reviews are pretty much all great and I like the fact that a forged, 10" chef's knife is $50. I'd still like a carbon steel knife but these look like a great knife for the price. Have to get something soon as the handle on my cheap stamped stainless knife that I've loved for years has started to crumble. If that goes I'm stuck with my ruined Henckels (I got over zealous with an electric sharpener, ugh).
post #30 of 39

 and Swiss

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdboatbum View Post

I recently heard about Mercer Culinary Renaissance knives. Anybody have any experience with them? The reviews are pretty much all great and I like the fact that a forged, 10" chef's knife is $50. I'd still like a carbon steel knife but these look like a great knife for the price. Have to get something soon as the handle on my cheap stamped stainless knife that I've loved for years has started to crumble. If that goes I'm stuck with my ruined Henckels (I got over zealous with an electric sharpener, ugh).


I have a Mercer Usuba Vegetable Cleaver and love it especially for the price. They use the same steel as the better quality German and Swiss knives. The edge was improved when I sharpened it the first time, but I'm admittedly a little picky about the edges on my knives. I give it a quick once over with a ceramic sharpening rod every once in a while which keeps it sharp, even though I use it daily.

 

Agree with you on the carbon steel knives. I have an old Case carbon steel butcher knife and it seems easier to sharpen and maybe even takes a little sharper edge. One source of older carbon steel knives is ebay

post #31 of 39

My wife worked at Sur-La-Table for 2 years so we got to try out/buy a lot of their knives. If you have one of those stores near you the sharpening class is awesome and you get a Stone out of it. I took the class and then bought the set of 3 Kramer Stones and sharpening set. Now every knife we have is good to use not just the nice ones we bought from SLT.

 

However, I would recommend the Bob Kramer 8" Carbon Steel Chef's Knife. I use it for a lot of meat prep and cutting. (not for boning) But it has a great feel for a guy with big hands and after some use the carbon steel starts to change color and leaves with a good looking knife. I take care of mine and polish it often. But haven't sharpened it yet in about a year's use. But I have heard people hating this knife, I think it's hit or miss with some people.

 

The other's at SLT all just depend on what you need. I didn't buy a cleaver from here, got a cheap/vintage one at goodwill and restored/re-sharpened it as a project. 

 

I do use the Kramer Damascus 6" utility as my steak knife and love it. The Damascus steel design is very cool.

 

I also have a random collection of Shun, Miyabi, and Wustoff from here so if looking at one of those would be glad to help you out. All are great and hold a fine sharpen for a long period of time with proper care. The 7" Miyabi chef knife is pretty handy as an do-everything knife. 

post #32 of 39

I've gotten spoiled.  My corner grocery butcher sharpens knives for free while we shop. 

post #33 of 39


The modern stainless steel knives are very hard and therefore much more difficult to sharpen. Some of them will ruin a good steel sharpener. A good set of stones will do a fine job and a careless wife will destroy an edge in a heartbeat.

post #34 of 39

Well, I guess I'm just old fashion... I only buy carbon steel knives.  They sharpen easy and hold a edge, plus they are cheep. 

post #35 of 39
There are so many factors that come into knives keeping their edge. Yes the biggest one is the quality of the blade. But what you cut, what you cut on and how the blade is cared for will all effect the knife as well. It is funny to see the conversations in the kitchens on how to sharpen a knife. It is almost as debated as what BBQ is the best...... I prefer a tri stone along with a diamond steel (fine sharpening) and a butcher steel for edge deburing. For me by using the 2 diffrent style steels I very rarely need to use the tri stone. What I find to be the most important part of blade maintenance is a consistent angle.

As for me and what knives I prefer. I will have to say a sharp one. I have so many knives that I have aquired over the past 25 years it is hard to say which one is best. I have cheap ones and have some that are over priced. I have larger hands than most, so I like a bigger grip for the handle. I find many knives annoying because the handles are small. So I would make sure to try as many diffrent ones as possible before investing in a set. Look at what the kife is going to be used for. I like a molded handle knife for when I am working with food that is going to get my hands grimmy. This way if my hands have fat on them the knife will not slip as much. Dont be afraid to have a mismatch set of knives, as long as they work for you that is really all that matters.

Sorry if I added more confusion than clarity. .....
post #36 of 39

I like old damascus steel knives. I scour yardsales and thriftstores in the spring for cast iron and good knives. It is amazing what you can find if you keep your eyes open.

post #37 of 39
An old butcher from wayback told me the best knife ever is Fredric Dick. Pricey but worth it. The Forschner and Wusthoffs have a harder blade making them difficult to sharpen. The Dick is slightly softer and will hone to a razor perfection however holds its sharpness like a harder blade. Popular with the chef crowd.
Saving my ducketts for a set someday. drool.gif
post #38 of 39

I buy pretty much all my cooking, grilling and smoking stuff at the Restaurant Supply,  The knives I still use today,  Take care of them they will last forever.

 

I have Dexter and J A Henckels,   The Henckels I bought 39 years ago the Dexter I bought probably 25 years ago

 

Gary

post #39 of 39

We have a new member on the forum "Bladebuilder" and he makes some nice looking blades, I PM'd with him a bit, seems like a really nice guy. Never talked price with him, but might be worth shooting him an email.

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