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Creosote problem - Page 2

post #21 of 32

:duel:

 

Like the old addage says "your results may vary".  I know my results have suffered from MY (operator error) efforts, generally NOT from the equipment.

 

I for one agree with Bearcarver.  I have the MES and the AMNPS, and have not personally experienced any creosote problem.  I only use my MES for heat, and the AMNPS for smoke.  They work well together and I'll keep doing what works for me.

 

Good luck to each of you, and keep up the fun!

post #22 of 32

I just don't have the experience of many here. However, the first few months I used my Bradley Electric smoker, I fought to get a nice smoke flavour instead of a too strong flavour. When I switched to the AMNPS, life just got easier and my family and friends enjoyed the product more.

 

I am not saying the AMNPS is everyone's solution but I sure like it.

 

Disco

post #23 of 32

Generating smoke is really about controlling the fire

You need 3 things for fire.....

- Fuel

- Oxygen

- Ignition Source

Without all 3, you won't get fire

Too much oxygen or draft, and you get high heat or flame and little smoke

Too little oxygen, and you generate creosote and other nasty chemicals

 

Using an electric element as your Source of Ignition, and Wood for Fuel, but not allowing enough oxygen for a proper burn will cause creosote to form. 

 

Adding moisture to the mix will also cause the particles to condense, rather than flow freely out the exhaust.  You should close the intake to control the oxygen, not close the exhaust.

 

If your chips or chunks are turning black, and not burning completely, you're making charcoal.  Charcoal is pure carbon that's formed in a low or no oxygen atmosphere.

 

If the OP can't get a complete burn, it may be just as simple as adding an extra hole for intake air

 

Todd

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

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post #24 of 32
Well said Todd. I woke up way early this morning (about 1:30ish) wondering if Canajun Bacon was experiencing air intake/low oxygen issues.
post #25 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJohnson View Post
 

Adding moisture to the mix will also cause the particles to condense, rather than flow freely out the exhaust.  You should close the intake to control the oxygen, not close the exhaust.

 

If your chips or chunks are turning black, and not burning completely, you're making charcoal.  Charcoal is pure carbon that's formed in a low or no oxygen atmosphere.

 

If the OP can't get a complete burn, it may be just as simple as adding an extra hole for intake air

 

Todd

 

So far all of my burns have had the exhaust open.This is what I have for an air intake . The wood ends up burnt right to ash, it just that it happens in the span of about 15 minutes. I think I'm starting to get things figured out, the journey to supreme smoking prowess is half the fun isn't it?

 

post #26 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch View Post

Well said Todd. I woke up way early this morning (about 1:30ish) wondering if Canajun Bacon was experiencing air intake/low oxygen issues.

 

Hahahaha, sorry you're losing sleep. Really appreciate all the advice you guys are giving me though.:beercheer:

post #27 of 32

My brain was rattling around at the same time.....

Different Reasons Though!

 

The inherent problems with electric smokers are the heat source or "Ignition Source" is extremely hot when the element is on, and no heat or "Ignition Source" when the element is off.  Also, there is not adequate Oxygen for combustion.

 

Why don't propane smokers have the same issues as electric smokers?

Because they have a constant Ignition Source and adequate Oxygen or intake air for proper combustion

 

We can debate processes and procedures all day long, but the fact still remains, you need a constant Ignition Source and Oxygen for combustion

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

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post #28 of 32

Trial & Error.......

I have THOUSANDS of hours invested in "Trial & Error"

Once you have it figured out, another variable like the weather kicks in, and you'll be at it all over again.

 

More often than not, the solution is so simple, that it's overlooked.

 

If your chips are burning up in 15 minutes, then they are too close to the "Ignition Source" and you may have too much Oxygen.  All you're producing are BTU's, and not smoke

A cast iron pan can be used as a heat sink, and this may help your chips smolder longer, rather than burn up

Also, smaller chunks seem to work better than chips.

 

Keep Plugging Away!

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

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post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 

About 95% or more of people who used the Amazings have not gone back to using their electric smoker's chip burners.

Also about 95% of people who have used the Smoke Daddy have gone to an Amazing since.

 

If you're getting creosote from an AMNPS, maybe you should learn how to use it, like you say to all the 95% of the people who disagree with you.

 

I've probably had thousands who have followed my Step by Steps, which includes how I smoke, and haven't had any complaints yet.

 

I've expressed my opinion, so I'm done with this discussion.

 

Bear

Well, this is interesting!

 

Bear, I've spent most of my life dealing with statistics and numbers and am curious as to what your source data is for the highlighted comments you've made. I'd love to see your backup.

 

Thanks. Your input is certainly appreciated.

post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by dls1 View Post
 

Well, this is interesting!

 

Bear, I've spent most of my life dealing with statistics and numbers and am curious as to what your source data is for the highlighted comments you've made. I'd love to see your backup.

 

Thanks. Your input is certainly appreciated.

 

head-wall.gif

post #31 of 32

Please Respect the OP's Original Post, and Keep This Thread On Track!

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

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post #32 of 32

Generic answer, I'm not up for a debate

 

  • Ditch the chips
  • Do not Soak the wood (please do not debate this)
  • Lay the wood horizontal for more volume and stack for more volume and longevity or place wood upright for less volume and longevity.
  • All vents open
  • Use a heavy cast iron wood box
  • experiment with placement of the wood box, you can add diffusers to the top of the burner.
  • Pull chunks when they are completely black (I do not let them go to ash, I seem to get a burst of heavy white smoke just before the chunks start ashing up, very similar to starting a chimney of lump/or/charcoal, but you can let them go to ash with no ill effect.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is not a shot in the dark, this is what works 100% of the time for me on my GOSM, I have done a lot of trial and error getting to this point.

 

Please note, my burn time can be several hours per stack of chunks, this adds a hint of smoke, if you want more of a smoky flavor, this is not for you!

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