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I Guess I don't know What to do

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I was planning on making some jerky tomorrow but after reading here for a bit I am a bit confused

 

I am marinading my meat overnight 24hrs or a bit less, but my question and this is where I am not completely sure of is temp.

What temperature and for how long do I smoke for before my meat is done enough to eat.  

 

I have about 1/2 inch slices and do not what my meat hard (done but not hard).  

 

Also do I have to dry after smoking?  Some say yes and some say no.  I can cook a whole chicken in 3 hours but I see some drying jerky for 12 hours.  What the heck?  

 

Please help the new confused smoky :confused:

 

Thank you.

post #2 of 11

I have made jerky several times using the method in Weber's Smoke cookbook.  After marinade, I smoke it at 150-175* for 6 to 7 hours.  It turns out great!

 

 

 

 


Edited by Bama BBQ - 9/21/13 at 6:17am
post #3 of 11
Chicken is cooked at a high temp, 250-300.
Jerky is dried at a low temp, 100-170.
Big Big difference!
You could cook your jerky meat and get it done even faster than cooking chicken but you wouldn't have jerky, you would have cooked meat. The texture and flavor would not be the same.

You can dry jerky in your smoker and apply smoke and stop smoke when you think it has taken on enough smoke flavor for you and continue to dry it in there. I do it all the time in my smokehouse.

1/2" is a little thick for jerky but will work, it will just take longer to dry. Most cut their meat for jerky about 1/4"-3/8".

I don't really know what you mean by "done but not hard". Jerky gets somewhat hard, it has had all the moisture taken out of it. It should still be pliable and not brittle but not real soft.

When I make jerky I start out at 100* for about an hour then apply smoke and hold at 100* for another hour. I then start bumping the temp 10* every hour and max out at 160* and hold it there until it's done. I consider it done when it is no longer soft and limp and looks very translucent when held to a light, also it should just start to crack when bent 90*.

Did you use any cure in your marinade? Cure is important because drying jerky can take many hours at low temps, a perfect environment for bacteria to grow.
post #4 of 11

Some good stuff above, the best jerky I ever made was 1/2 and 1/2. I marinated it for a day, I smoked it first and then I threw it in a dehydrator over night to ensure it was moisture free.. Everywhere I have been (I admit its all mostly the south), jerky is super dry. I have had some of the jerky which is dried but still like eat ting steak, you know the stuff folks keep in the freezer so it doesn't spoil. Jerked meat to me is the meat equivalent to hardtack for bread, (Pop always called 'em 'cold camp bisquits').

 

I just ordered a couple of eye of round today to make jerky for my baby sister's yearly 'no men allowed' Georgia hiking trip next month...... LOL Its a yearly pilgrimage, I still doubt much mountain climbing is involved, but the girls all come back laughing and in a better mood. I suggested they do it twice a year and got "the" look.

 

My jerky is never quite the same, it varied with the meat, how I cut it, the temp outside....... They always say they love it, they demand it each year, but you know how it goes...... It make cut it thicker or thinner and just need to adjust accordingly in the smoker. I really always figured I could do anything for taste and smoke cause I am going to completely guaranty moisture free in the dehydrator.

 

I know a real smoker would do it all in the smoker....... well that dehydrator is a dang useful tool.

 

One of my Pop's favorite saying, "I know the indians didn't do it that way, but they would've if they could've!"

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Will I be ok if I didn't cure the meat?
post #6 of 11

Mods below is a link to the USDA that is important to the OP

 

 

USDA Food safety on Jerky


Please read the general notes before making jerky.
 

  • Select the meat you will be using and place it in the freezer for 2 hours or so, this will make it easier to slice.
8080289389_2f56c068ab_z.jpg

 

  • Having a good quality slicer is a great tool for making jerky.
8080303987_8d55ff39e0_z.jpg


 

  • Remove any fat or nasty bits from the meat, Flank Steak (erroneously named London Broils) is one of the cuts of meat I prefer for Jerky Making. Slice the meat to your preferred thickness, I do mine at 1/4". For a heavy chew with whole muscle meat, slice it with the grain, for a soft chew, slice across the grain. Meat sliced and ready to be marinated.
8080295793_f5de614998_z.jpg
 
  • Weigh the meat and figure out the correct amount of TQ to use, too much and its too salty, too little and it can become unsafe at lower drying temps.
8080290237_71f0a642b6_z.jpg
 
  • Mix all ingredients together with the exception of the meat. Allow the ingredients at least 15 minutes for the flavors to blend. Add meat, Marinate in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for at least 24 -36 hours., I prefer using gallon Ziploc Bags, today I had none.
8080284179_e83b9d02a5_z.jpg


 

  • I will sometimes use my Vacuum Seal canisters.
8080298764_4d6e3a6a49_z.jpg

 

  • Remove the meat and place on a cooling rack with a pan under neath, Drain the meat and place on paper towels, blot dry and place on a cooling rack, make sure that the meat does not overlap. Crack some fresh black pepper, lightly to the meat.
8080292720_71f58923c7_z.jpg
 
8080285940_301d4f37df_z.jpg

 

  • Prepare the Smoker or Dehydrator, do not use water in the water pan if using a smoker. Smoke at lowest temp possible, do not go above 140 degrees, use a propane torch to start the wood smoking or use a smoke generator, such as an AMNPS.

 

  • SMOKER
8080300715_3ec36bdbac_z.jpg

 
  • NESCO DEHYDRATOR  Nesco Food Dehydrator, FD75-PR Snack Master.
  • If you are using TQ... DO NOT go by Nesco's temp of 155 degrees, set it on a lower setting, I prefer 120°
8080297326_8b6b66be3b_z.jpg

 

  • Check the texture after about 3 hours, and wait until it's getting leathery before you pull it. Pull it when it’s leathery but not to soft in the middle, it will continue to dry while it is resting. You want a leathery product that will crack like old leather when bent, if it breaks it is too dry.
8080286369_97785abc73_z.jpg

 
  • You want it to crack with the grain but not against the grain. 
8080286257_a7cb07d479_z.jpg
 
8080285669_e823322d01_z.jpg
 

Test a piece, but remember, it will taste differently after it has had time to rest overnight, Leave it rest uncovered till the next day then vacuum seal. The flavors change and the texture gets a little drier.

 

 

 

  • Note the pink color, which is caused by the cure, THIS IS SAFE!
8080280648_0bee888abd_z.jpg

 

When stored in the freezer, thaw in the unopened bag and let it get to room temperature before opening or else condensation can form on the jerky. Let the jerky rest open for a few hours before eating if you want to store on the counter, a loosely closed paper bag or plastic container with air holes poked in it will prevent mold however it will keep drying and becoming brittle.

  • I usualy Vac-Seal my jerky.
8080288419_2bac8122d1_z.jpg


  
 




 

 
 

 

General Jerky notes

 

  • London broil (Top Round), preferred, Flank steak will sometimes be labeled London Broil, London broils is actually a cooking method but for my sanity I will not go into detail, Google it!
  • I use 1.5 teaspoon of Morton® Tender Quick® to each 1lb of ground or thin sliced meat 1/4". Morton® Tender Quick® suggests 1 tablespoon per/lb for thin sliced meat at 1/2", but their curing process is for a dry cure and for 1 hour which is different than what is outlined here. This is your decision!

 

  • The cure time can go for a few days if something prevents you from doing the smoke. Cure at least 24 hours for the jerky.

 

  • If Tender Quick is used omit all salt in the seasoning, and use soy sauces or any pre-made marinades with salt cautiously.

 

  • The Morton® Tender Quick® allows you to take your sweet time getting it dried out after smoking without worries of food borne illness.
  • If using a food dehydrator, you can use liquid smoke for a smoky flavor, I do not, set the Dehydrator on 120° maximum. The Nesco manual says 155° but that cooks the meat and the outside gets crusty, if you are using Morton® Tender Quick® you can dry it at much lower temps. Remember you want to dry it out, not cook it, I prefer 120°.
  • Another good tip is after slicing the meat, lay in a criss cross pattern, a sort of weave, and place in a covered dish then place in the refrigerator overnight. The next day pour off the liquid then place the meat in the cure and refrigerate another 24 hours.
  • Best luck has been with flavoring the outside of the jerky while still wet.
  • I have made lots of Jerky over the years without using cure and had never been ill from it, however after doing a bit of research about the "Danger Zone" , I decided to start using cure.
  • Slicing tip: freeze the meat about 2 hours in your freezer before slicing, this will make it easier to slice! Slice the meat against the grain for an easier chew and with the grain for a tougher chew, this is entirely up to you.
  • OPTIONAL: Place the meat in an uncovered dish in a criss-cross pattern, place in the refrigerator for 24 hours.Remove from the refrigerator and drain.
 
Here are a few recipes to toy around with, enjoy!

 


 

Honey Barbecue

For 4lbs.

 

  • 2 tsp coarse grind black pepper
  • 2 tsp chili powder
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • ½ tbsp onion powder
  • ½ cup Apple juice
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup Soy Sauce
  • ¼ cup burgundy
  • 1.5 tsp Morton® Tender Quick®per pound of meat.(please read jerky notes about cure)
  • ¼ c. Honey
  • 1 cup Barbecue sauce

Slice the meat to your preferred thickness
Mix all ingredients except the last 2
Place meat in a Ziploc bag and refrigerate for 24 hours.

After 24 hours remove from refrigerator, place meat in a colander remove meat and blot dry.
Brush one side with honey and the other side with Barbecue sauce, crack some pepper on each side and place in smoker or dehydrator.
 

Pepper Jerky
For 1-1.5lbs.

 

  • 1 Tbl. Worcestershire
  • ¼ cup Soy Sauce
  • 3 Tbl. Captain Morgan
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 Tbl coarse grind black pepper
  • 1.5 tsp Morton® Tender Quick®per pound of meat.(please read jerky notes about cure)

 



Slice the meat to your preferred thickness
Mix all ingredients
Place meat in a Ziploc bag and refrigerate for 24 hours.

After 24 hours remove from refrigerator, place meat in a colander remove meat and crack some pepper on each side and place in smoker or dehydrator.

 

Spicy Orange
For 1-1.5 lbs.

 

  • zest from 1 orange
  • Juice from orange
  • 1 tsp orange extract
  • 2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 Tbsp. brown sugar
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ cup Soy Sauce
  • 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire
  • ¼ cup cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Chili Powder
  • 1.5 tsp Morton® Tender Quick®per pound of meat. (please read jerky notes about cure)

Slice the meat to your preferred thickness
Mix all ingredients.
Place meat in a Ziploc bag and refrigerate for 24 hours.

After 24 hours remove from refrigerator, place meat in a colander remove meat and crack some pepper on each side and place in smoker or dehydrator.
 

 

 
Honey Mustard
For 1-1.5 lbs.
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 heaping teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1/4 cup Soy Sauce
  • 1 Tbsp. Mustard Seed
  • 1/2 tsp. chili powder
  • 1 tsp Rosemary
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1.5 tsp Morton® Tender Quick®per pound of meat. (please read jerky notes about cure)
  • ¼ cup honey
  • ¼ c. Dijon mustard
Slice the meat to your preferred thickness
Mix all ingredients except the last 2
Place meat in a Ziploc bag and refrigerate for 24 hours.

After 24 hours remove from refrigerator, place meat in a colander remove meat and blot dry.
Brush one side with honey and the other side with Dijon mustard, crack some pepper on each side and place in smoker or dehydrator.

Burgundy Jerky
For 1-1.5 lbs.

  • 1/4 cup Merlot or burgundy
  • 1/4 red wine vinegar
  • 1/4 brown sugar, if using Dark Brown Sugar omit the molasses
  • 1 Table liquid smoke
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire
  • 3 garlic cloves chopped
  • 3 tbls Molasses, if not using Dark Brown Sugar
  • 1 Teaspoon garlic
  • 1 Teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 Teaspoon red pepper
  • 1 Teaspoon Coarse Black Pepper
  • 1.5 tsp Morton® Tender Quick®per pound of meat. (please read jerky notes about cure)

Slice the meat to your preferred thickness
Mix all ingredients
Place meat in a Ziploc bag and refrigerate for 24 hours.

Coconut Jerky
For 1-1.5 lbs.

  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • ½ tsp chili powder
  • 3 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tsp coconut extract
  • ½ c. coconut milk
  • 3 Tbsp Malibu coconut rum.
  • 1 cup Pineapple Juice
  • 1/4 cup Soy Sauce
  • 1.5 tsp Morton® Tender Quick®per pound of meat. (please read jerky notes about cure)

Slice the meat to your preferred thickness
Mix all ingredients
Place meat in a Ziploc bag and refrigerate for 24 hours.


 

Teriyaki Jerky
For 1-1.5 lbs.


  • 1/2 cup of Teriyaki
  • 1/4 cup Red Wine Vinegar
  • 1 cup Pineapple Juice
  • 1/4 cup Soy Sauce
  • 1 Teaspoon Coarse Black Pepper
  • 1.5 tsp Morton® Tender Quick®per pound of meat. (please read jerky notes about cure)

Slice the meat to your preferred thickness
Mix all ingredients
Place meat in a Ziploc bag and refrigerate for 24 hours.
 

 

Edited by SQWIB - 9/20/13 at 9:34am
post #7 of 11

Sqwib

 

Thanks for this!  Just in time for deer season.  Back in the day my buddies and I would slice the venison into strips, marinade overnight in whatever looked good, then just throw it in the smoker and hope for the best.  Never got sick, but was probably due more to luck and healthy constitutions than any skill on our part.

 

Nice to know the right way to do it, hopefully we'll be processing venison soon.

 

If it's brown it's down! (no puppies).

post #8 of 11

SQUIB, Nice post, thanks.

 

Tom

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaywardSwede View Post
 

Sqwib

 

Thanks for this!  Just in time for deer season.  Back in the day my buddies and I would slice the venison into strips, marinade overnight in whatever looked good, then just throw it in the smoker and hope for the best.  Never got sick, but was probably due more to luck and healthy constitutions than any skill on our part.

 

Nice to know the right way to do it, hopefully we'll be processing venison soon.

 

If it's brown it's down! (no puppies).

 

That's the way I've done it for 20+ years until I joined SMF and started doing my homework.

post #10 of 11

Great tutorial Squib.....read that in detail when I first started jerky making. I've gotten a touch lazy & more or less follow Foams method. I do have a dehydrator and find it a very useful tool & like most tools, not used every day, but handy. I like my jerky to bring a tear to the eye....find it goes much better with an ice cold beer that way. I do the overnight marinade on slices between the 1/4 & 3/8ths. Sometimes Wal-Mart will have their sliced beef for whatever on special & I will use that...that's sliced pretty thin so I must watch the time in the dryer. I do use cure but also cheat and use liquid smoke in the marinade. I know, sacrilege....BUT, my pals all love it so I figure I must be doing something right and continue with the use of it. The London Broil cut is my fav for jerky making but the price per pound is going up constantly so I look for alternatives. Safeway's running a special on bottom round this week....2.49 a pound. Picked up 2 smaller ones....one for jerky and one for razor thin slicing for French Dips.....let the good times roll

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by SQWIB View Post
 
 

 

  • Prepare the Smoker or Dehydrator, do not use water in the water pan if using a smoker. Smoke at lowest temp possible, do not go above 140 degrees, use a propane torch to start the wood smoking or use a smoke generator, such as an AMNPS.

 

  • SMOKER
8080300715_3ec36bdbac_z.jpg

 
 

 

 

I want to know, is that one of those custom made circular top-handled AMNPS


Edited by Foamheart - 9/20/13 at 6:43pm
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