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King's Hawaiian Clone Bread

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

King's Hawaiian Bread and Rolls are a big favorite of Rock's. So I set out to come up with something as close to it as I could. 

 

I use a Golden Egg Bread recipe for French Toast, (if you've never made French Toast with Egg Bread, you are really missing out). So I thought why can't I substitute Pineapple Juice for the water, add some Vanilla Extract and a little Ginger. It worked and made the most decadent French Toast.

 

I don't have a stand mixer, so I make 98% of all my bread by hand. This recipe was originally for a bread machine.

 

Golden Egg Breadhttp://www.tasteofhome.com/Recipes/Golden-Egg-Bread )

 

3/4 cup warm water (70-80*)

3 Tbsp sugar (I used Pure Cane Sugar)

3 Tbsp vegetable oil

2 extra large or jumbo eggs, beaten

1 1/2 tsp salt

3 1/4 - 3 1/2 cups bread flour (I used 3 1/4 cups)

2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast (1 envelope)

1 1/2 Tbsp Vital Wheat Gluten (this wasn't in the original recipe but helps with the rise at this altitude)

 

Proof the yeast in the warm water that you have dissolved the sugar in for 10 minutes. Add the oil and salt, then the beaten eggs. Start adding in the flour, a 1/2 cup at a time. Knead for about 8-10 minutes, then place in a well oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and a hot wet dish towel and let rise 1 hour or double in size. Turn dough out onto lightly floured surface and form into a loaf. Place in a large greased loaf pan (9x5), cover again and let rise about 1 hour or about 1 inch or so above the rim of the pan. Pre heat oven to 375*. Bake on low rack for 30-35 minutes. I let it cool about 5 minutes then brush the top with melted butter. Turn out onto rack and cool completely.

 

King's Hawaiian Clone Bread

 

Use the Golden Egg Bread recipe above, substituting warm Pineapple Juice for the warm water, add 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract and 1/8 tsp Ground Ginger (optional). 

 

Second Rise

 

 

 

 

French Toast before the syrup! I made this for my Mother's Day Breakfast!!!!!

 

Thanks for looking!

post #2 of 10
Looks great! I love Hawaiian bread for French toast. It's also really tasty dipped in clam chowder! Thanks for the recipe.
post #3 of 10

Looks amazing!  I am going to print and try this!  Love the smell of baking bread!

 

Thanks Dear!

 

Kat

post #4 of 10

Great looking loaf Alesia,

I've started using vital wheat gluten per your tip ( Roller's wheat bread, whole wheat version 

makes a HUGE difference. Bookmarked this one, will try for sure. Thanks for sharing. Catch you latter, Phillip

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thank you! Never thought of having it with clam chowder, I'll bet that would be good. We like to take the rolls and pop them on the grill when we are using it...that's good!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

Looks great! I love Hawaiian bread for French toast. It's also really tasty dipped in clam chowder! Thanks for the recipe.

Thank you! It smelled just like the King's Hawaiian Rolls...

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynN View Post

Looks amazing!  I am going to print and try this!  Love the smell of baking bread!

 

Thanks Dear!

 

Kat

Thank you! That Vital Wheat Gluten makes a huge difference now doesn't it? This is good stuff too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pcallison View Post

Great looking loaf Alesia,

I've started using vital wheat gluten per your tip ( Roller's wheat bread, whole wheat version 

makes a HUGE difference. Bookmarked this one, will try for sure. Thanks for sharing. Catch you latter, Phillip

post #6 of 10

Okay so tell this bread novice how do you when you've added enough flour? help.gif

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

Okay so tell this bread novice how do you when you've added enough flour? help.gif

When making it with a stand mixer, the dough should not stick to the sides. When making it by hand, I leave the "dough" in the large mixing bowl and continue kneading in 1/2 cup flour at a time until it starts pulling away from the sides and is still only slightly sticky, then I turn it out onto a floured surface (using the next 1/2 cup) and continue kneading the flour in to the dough until it is no longer sticky and is becoming soft and shiny, but not dry. While kneading in the flour, I can usually tell if it's "taken" all the flour it will take without being dry.

 

Here's a good explanation of bread making here: http://reluctantgourmet.com/cooking-techniques/baking/item/51-how-to-make-bread

I found this info on that site. It's always better to add a bit less than to put too much in. A bit under will still give you a good rise, but too much will make a heavy dense loaf. First, almost any bread recipe will give you a range for the amount of flour called for. This is because, on any given day and depending on the protein content of your particular flour, it will accept more or less water depending upon the humidity and temperature in the air and the humidity and temperature of your flour.

 

Hope this helps. 

post #8 of 10

This sounds good Alesia. I used to tell my students the dough should be Firm and Smooth as a Baby's Butt. The Girls always got it but some of the young Guys needed a different analogy. I suggested they substitute Victoria's Secret Model for Baby...You could see the Light go on across the room...xrocker.gif...JJ

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post

This sounds good Alesia. I used to tell my students the dough should be Firm and Smooth as a Baby's Butt. The Girls always got it but some of the young Guys needed a different analogy. I suggested they substitute Victoria's Secret Model for Baby...You could see the Light go on across the room...xrocker.gif...JJ

 

Okay take Fiancee to Victoria Secrets after making mess in kitchen? laugh1.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinHusker View Post

When making it with a stand mixer, the dough should not stick to the sides. When making it by hand, I leave the "dough" in the large mixing bowl and continue kneading in 1/2 cup flour at a time until it starts pulling away from the sides and is still only slightly sticky, then I turn it out onto a floured surface (using the next 1/2 cup) and continue kneading the flour in to the dough until it is no longer sticky and is becoming soft and shiny, but not dry. While kneading in the flour, I can usually tell if it's "taken" all the flour it will take without being dry.

 

Here's a good explanation of bread making here: http://reluctantgourmet.com/cooking-techniques/baking/item/51-how-to-make-bread

I found this info on that site. It's always better to add a bit less than to put too much in. A bit under will still give you a good rise, but too much will make a heavy dense loaf. First, almost any bread recipe will give you a range for the amount of flour called for. This is because, on any given day and depending on the protein content of your particular flour, it will accept more or less water depending upon the humidity and temperature in the air and the humidity and temperature of your flour.

 

Hope this helps. 

That helps a bunch! I will be trying this soon! My boys love french toast!

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post

This sounds good Alesia. I used to tell my students the dough should be Firm and Smooth as a Baby's Butt. The Girls always got it but some of the young Guys needed a different analogy. I suggested they substitute Victoria's Secret Model for Baby...You could see the Light go on across the room...xrocker.gif...JJ

Thanks! That's a great analogy JJ and thanks for helping with the explanation!

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