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Automated Butcher

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Pretty amazing! Doesn't get tired.

 

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=deb_1355769233

post #2 of 17

Impressive..yes, but no machine will ever replace a well trained meat cutter.

post #3 of 17

Intermediary stepping stone to full animal processing, as soon as structure/texture variances can be realized.  In other words, whole carcasses of animals, fresh from the kill floor, will be automatically dehided, completely ground, meat and bone, then reformed into popular 'cuts'.   For example, the mythical "Kyndalyke" product line:  "Kyndalyke T-Bones", "Kyndalyke Pork Chops", "Kyndalyke Boneless Lamb Roast" and so on.... sooner than you think, stocked in freezers or dehydrated form!

post #4 of 17

Can you imagine how long it takes to wash that place downand clean it every day.

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoity Toit View Post
 

Can you imagine how long it takes to wash that place downand clean it every day.


Cleaning that would take some doing. By the way, nice looking summer sausage you just made!

post #6 of 17

Thanks, I am going to cut one open today to see how it looks and tastes with the olives in it. I'm hoping it came out kind of like a loaf so I can slice thin for sandwiches.

post #7 of 17

Actually, science is taking a different approach - bypassing the animal.  Stop and figure how much water, grain, other feed, labor (ever clean a pig pen?), and all other resources it takes to raise, slaughter and process the animal for it's meat.  

 

Now there is "Beyond Meat®" already on the shelves of Whole Foods®.   www.beyondmeat.com   This company takes plant ingredients and manufactures a meat - like substance, known as meat analog.  One of the backers of this project is Bill Gates, who is concerned on a global scale how to feed the world's ever growing populations.  They are successful with chicken - indistinguishable with real chicken, and working on other products as well.  Think that an animal is a manufacturing plant to turn plants into meat and fat.  In that concept, it is not that far-fetched and can reasonably be reproduced. 

post #8 of 17

So its the next step after soy-patties?

post #9 of 17

First time i seen this. To think i did all that with my hands for over 35 years and now this.  I've seen a lot evolve over the years in that buisness so i guess i should not be surprised.  One heck of a clean up crew LOL.  Thanks for posting this. Reinhard

post #10 of 17

I'll bet that darn thing cleans itself!

 

Good luck and good smoking.

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodcutter View Post
 

Pretty amazing! Doesn't get tired.

 

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=deb_1355769233


Interesting video, Woodcutter, but some of the equipment and technology shown is somewhat crude compared to current and emerging technology. One company I'm familiar with, Mayekawa of Japan, has adapted the robotics of auto manufacturing and significantly refined them for meat processing. Their equipment uses pressure sensors, 3D, and X Ray technology simultaneously on devices that debone chicken and turkey breasts and legs as well as ham and pork shoulder deboners with an efficiency that would equal a highly skilled butcher, especially when considering that they operate at a significantly higher volume and do so continuously.

 

Chicken breast deboner video > http://www.diginfo.tv/v/11-0122-d-en.php

 

Ham boner video > http://www.diginfo.tv/v/10-0250-f-en.php


Edited by dls1 - 12/3/13 at 10:18am
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

"I'm a low tech redneck in a high tech world" Phil Robertson -Duck Dynasty

 

It really is amazing. I was kind of hoping to see the plucker.....lol

post #13 of 17

Amazing piece of technology but I really question how you get proper quality control.

 

Disco

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disco View Post
 

Amazing piece of technology but I really question how you get proper quality control.

 

Disco


They don't care about QA anymore, oh they like to say it, but they are not willing to pay for it. I hate to say this after all the bragging I have done on my butcher but I am moving to the Sam's/Walmart butchers. No not because of the price, because of the product. Seems I get rotten meat every other week these days in factory cryopacs. Butcher says she doesn't buy the food, and the owners shop for the "Good Deals". So this week I am going to start ordering from Walmart. If I am leaving and I know them, they have got to be seeing a lose of sales.

 

Its a shame, I know the owners of the store, they now have two more stores in 10 years and are presently building another one. I guess Sh*t sells and people today come and go in a transient world and that is their target marketplace. <Shrugs> I know it wasn't my philosophy when in business, I'd rather sell one perfect item at a 100% mark-up w/ parts and service, than to sell 10 at a 10% mark-up POS (think about men in Black), out the door.  

 

Walmart/Sams can give a 6 week due date and the IGA gives 1 day off the shelf and you can see the blood standing already?

 

Sorry I'll get off my soapbox, its just a different world this day! (Its a damn shame too!)

 

PS:: Ya gotta love the new Google delivery system.....LOL

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamheart View Post
 


They don't care about QA anymore, oh they like to say it, but they are not willing to pay for it. I hate to say this after all the bragging I have done on my butcher but I am moving to the Sam's/Walmart butchers. No not because of the price, because of the product. Seems I get rotten meat every other week these days in factory cryopacs. Butcher says she doesn't buy the food, and the owners shop for the "Good Deals". So this week I am going to start ordering from Walmart. If I am leaving and I know them, they have got to be seeing a lose of sales.

 

Its a shame, I know the owners of the store, they now have two more stores in 10 years and are presently building another one. I guess Sh*t sells and people today come and go in a transient world and that is their target marketplace. <Shrugs> I know it wasn't my philosophy when in business, I'd rather sell one perfect item at a 100% mark-up w/ parts and service, than to sell 10 at a 10% mark-up POS (think about men in Black), out the door.  

 

Walmart/Sams can give a 6 week due date and the IGA gives 1 day off the shelf and you can see the blood standing already?

 

Sorry I'll get off my soapbox, its just a different world this day! (Its a damn shame too!)

 

PS:: Ya gotta love the new Google delivery system.....LOL

Don't hold back, Foamheart, tell us how you feel! I have to agree though. When I was growing up we were on the lower end of the economic scale. However, my parents paid a bit more to buy from the local butcher who sold quality meat. Of course, so did everyone else in the neighborhood so the prices were only slightly higher than the supermarkets. Oh well. I learned young, you can't go back.

 

Disco

post #16 of 17

I've told this story before, but I'll relate it once again.  Got to see just how 'tube ground beef' got produced.  It was at a Moyer Packing Plant in Pa. (now ConAgra).  From cattle herded in live, up the StairCase to Heaven, stunned, slit, bled, gutted, dehided, split, quartered, cut into primals, then subprimals, COV'd, all trimmings processed, fat analyzed and ground twice and  put in 2, 5, 10 and 20 lb tubes, labeled, packed and shipped 4 hours later out the door.  In their processing, they were able to maintain 99.95-8% sanitary conditions, far better than a hospital operating room.  The result?  45 day shelf life on all meat products, including ground meat; no preservatives, but ultra sanitary conditions.  That "cheap tube ground meat" in the meatcase with a 30+ day shelf life is far better than the reground meat above it in the case, which has a 1 day shelf life simply because of that one fact.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pops6927 View Post
They are successful with chicken - indistinguishable with real chicken, and working on other products as well.

Yeah, because if there's something that 3rd world countries can't do is raise chickens.  :30:

 

While this type of stuff is amazing, there's no concern for the health implications.  Someone mentioned the grinding of the whole animal and making it into "cuts" of meat.  Some of the bacteria that are killed by cooking the meat to rare, only live on the outside of the meat.  Not when they assemble scraps into a good cut using meat glue.  I'm sure a lot of the folks here already know about it, but here's an article about it.  http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?id=8642900

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