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Block Smoker Build in MI - Page 3

post #41 of 56
I would say metal studs and cement board. They don't catch fire so easy.
post #42 of 56

Once you repair the block work and clean it up, another option would be to screw a metal roof to your block work with blue screws. (masonry screws)

post #43 of 56

You might also consider lining it with fire brick and using steel doors.

post #44 of 56
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the suggestions.    I was wondering if y'all think i need to scrub the inside of the smoker at all.  It was just building up a nice coating on the walls before all this happened.  anything that is black on the outside is just melted shingles-  but none of that really got inside.  Burning osb/aluminum flashing/ batt insulation got inside-  but only after i opened the door, put out the roof fire etc.

 

One thing i am thinking i will definately modify is a top exhaust pipe.  Probably 6"  or should i do 8?  perhaps put a damper in it too.  I could go strait through the new roof, or turn a block on its side and exhaust out the back top course.

 

I figure i will have go to with the angle steel and blocks to go over the top door opening-

 

@michael Ark,  Would cememt board bare be fine for the inside roof of the smoker? 

 

thanks again for all your help!

post #45 of 56
I would find some way of water proofing it by lay some flashing like shingles or a metal roof.
Edited by michael ark - 4/8/13 at 9:54am
post #46 of 56
Thread Starter 

So my initial thoughts for the roof:

 

atop the top course of block.  a steel plate (should it be 1/4" or 1/8"?)    Then frame with metal studs a small roof with a slope towards the back.  Then use cement board as sheathing.   I would either use corrugated metal as the roof- or try rolled roofing or shingles.  I would fill the roof cavity again with batt insulation.  

 

not having many tools to do any steel-fab work-  Debating doing a vent stack through the steel plate, or turn a block or two on that upper course on its side to allow smoke to leave that way

 

well, lunch over- back to work

post #47 of 56
kinda what Dave says... make a form that is big enough to have an overhang on all 4 sides (maybe longer on the door side)... use small 1/4 rebar to reinforce the "slab"... fill the form (maybe 2" thick) with concrete... strip the form off after it drys and there you have a solid roof... maybe some 4" PVC about 4-6 inches long filled with concrete and stripped after it's dry... use these for pillars on top of the top coarse in the front... these can be cemented to the block... then you set the "slab" on top ... slab can be cemented on to the pillars and along the back where it sits on top of the back wall.. these creates your sloped roof and also your vents as the pillars hold the front up however tall you made the pillars....

or make the slab the same way... and then use 2 coarses of brick across the top of the front wall to set the slab on.. leaving sides open for vents (covered with screen to keep critters out)
post #48 of 56
Thread Starter 

Well this weekend and Monday I rebuilt the Roof!  I used a sheet of 18 Gage steel, 5 layers 1/2" durock.  I put a 2.5" mtl stud track around the durock edge for appearance.  Roof is mtl studs with corrugated galv panels atop.  And some batt insulation in there.  Right now the roof is held on by weight and adhesive (hi heat on inner side, regular on outside).  I'd say the roof weighs at least 200# or more as is.

 

The new facade.  I painted the doors black.  The marks on the right side are forever in the blocks from the roof burning- I even used a wire wheel to to attempt to remove them-  They are like scars i guess.

 

 

 

 

front view with door open.  I did carve out any cooked insulation from the door's core, filled in with hi heat foam- re-flashed the top.  The light spot inside the door is the exhaust- i have 2 blocks on their side for exhaust.

 

side view.  The black marks from old tar will never come off-  

 

 

the back view of the exhaust.  If i need a damper i put a brick in the hole- in theory- i have yet to practice it

 

 

3/4 view from rear

 

 

Inside top of new roof.  Hi heat sealant in red.  It needs to be re-seasoned-  Which i will do tomorrow.  thanks again for all your help and input!

 

post #49 of 56

voltz, evening.... Hey..... as ugly as that smokehouse is now, I'd be willing to bet it puts out some absolutely great Q.....    Great job on puttin' her back together.....     

 

Which BBQ joint makes the best Q ????   The Ugly one..... that's a no brainer....

 

 

         images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTCdSnnONFNZgL6dEVfOYHVOPrWqoDOW9W4iMVrphHmrJiKFK_AJA   

 

  

post #50 of 56

sorry to read about the melt down. i'm glad you have it up and running again

happy smoken.

david

post #51 of 56
Thread Starter 

So I fired it up to season the new plate in the roof.  I decided to throw on half a chicken and a lamb breast.  I cooked on a minion method of mostly charcoal a few hickory chunks.  Really this as more a test run than finished product.  ALso this was directly over the coals, no water pan to buffer the heat (though i put a water pan on the grate to the side).  It ended up being the hot and fast method (though i usually do low and slow)  It got up to about 350 and gradually cooled down to about 315.  when i checked on these (3 hrs after starting) cooker was down to about 220.  I could ramble on about how i think i put too many coals on my unlit coals and made the cooker rise to too high of a temp, but instead look at the food photos;)

 

lamb breast left, chicken half right

 

 

underside of chicken

 

 

underside of lamb breast

 

 

cut through the lamb breast.  Next time i will let the internal temperature rise to a good 200 + just in hopes of getting more of that fat out.  OR trim it off.  All in all not a bad Q with 4$ worth of meat. 

 

 

my only real issue with both meats was an lack of smoke flavor, just due to being a 90% charcoal heat

post #52 of 56

Looks awesome!    Next time try letting your temp drop before you start.   You can simply open the door till the temp drops.  I have to do that to mine when it gets to hot.   I usually use just enough coals to keep the fire from going out and feed it splits for smoke and heat.

 

Great first run! 

post #53 of 56
Thread Starter 

Hi again, its been a little while since I last posted.  I got distracted with a kitchen remodel (at my house).  I clad the exterior of the smoker in old pallet boards (as you can see below) that photo is from a memorial day party (25 person party) :)

 

 

Brisket I cooked 2 sundays ago.  The smoker tends to lean towards the hot and fast method- and I hate to say it but its turned out the most tender brisket I have ever done- i did the brisket below in just under 6 hours.  Though it turned out great i think my cooking temperatures got a bit too hot-  will dial down the charcoal next time.  I did crutch this one (had to go to church)  so the bark was not really bark-  but in retrospect could have left it outside of the foil.  Cooked it to about 202 internal.  Still having some issues getting the right amount of smoke flavor- but i'm working on putting a grate between my charcoal basket and cooking grate.

 

 

fear not- after this slice i found out which way the grain was going!  

post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by cityofvoltz View Post

Hi again, its been a little while since I last posted.  I got distracted with a kitchen remodel (at my house).  I clad the exterior of the smoker in old pallet boards (as you can see below) that photo is from a memorial day party (25 person party) :)

 

 

Brisket I cooked 2 sundays ago.  The smoker tends to lean towards the hot and fast method- and I hate to say it but its turned out the most tender brisket I have ever done- i did the brisket below in just under 6 hours.  Though it turned out great i think my cooking temperatures got a bit too hot-  will dial down the charcoal next time.  I did crutch this one (had to go to church)  so the bark was not really bark-  but in retrospect could have left it outside of the foil.  Cooked it to about 202 internal.  Still having some issues getting the right amount of smoke flavor- but i'm working on putting a grate between my charcoal basket and cooking grate.

 

 

fear not- after this slice i found out which way the grain was going!  

Looks great.  a tip i learned a while back on here. Take a small slice off before you start the cook. that way you can find the grain after it is covered in bark.

Happy smoken.

David

post #55 of 56

Here's a tip..... bmudd or Dutch or someone that knows what they are doing suggests inserting a tooth pick before you start, showing which way the grain runs....   Simple....  

 

Dave

post #56 of 56

Looks awesome!    Glad you got your smoker up and running!

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