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Pennsylvania Dutch Bologna

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

x


Edited by TasunkaWitko - 8/12/13 at 3:02pm
post #2 of 12
Well, WOW, good tutorial and a lot of information! LOL
Lived in PA most of my life and grew up on the stuff!.
We just "make it", not much fuss, never a very complicated process and no binders!

Try some hogmaw sometime, that's not something you see every day.

Oh, on the salt, TQ provides ~3% salt when used at 1 tablespoon per pound, and , of course, half that ~1.5% salt when used at 1/2 tablespoon per pound of ground meat, which is a tad low on the salt.....many use ~1.8-2.0% for that type of sausage.

~Martin
post #3 of 12

Oh my I love love love Pennsylvania Dutch Bologna, having grown up back there. What an outstanding tutorial and information! Thanks so much!

post #4 of 12

Thats a different PA Dutch bologna but I LIKE IT.

 

And the Luhr Jenson sausage tube and press.....I still have mine HAHA. Damn im old. It was like an early fatty piston.

 

 

Nice looking PA Bologna, no all ya need is some cloth casings.

 

I did some sweet lebaono bologna while back.

 

When i lived in Lancaster county my Amish friend showed me how to use buckwheat flour in the SS and Bologna.

post #5 of 12

Killer Tute!

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Good morning, guys - and thanks for the very kind words. I am really pleased with the way this one turned out, and am glad that I am able to share it with anyone who might be thinking about giving it a try. This sausage really has an old-timey aroma and taste to it, and for some reason this nostalgic atmosphere also comes into play when you're actually making it as well. Give it a shot - 4 pounds of beef to 1 pound of pork isn't that bad at all - or use venison, as I did!

 

DDF - Thanks for the information on the salt. I'll keep taht in mind when I try this again, and see if I can't tweak this just a little in order to improve it. Hogmaw!?!?! One of these days, for sure!

 

Husker - Both you and DDF probably know what I mean when I say that making this really give one a feeling as if they are carrying on some old traditions. I am very glad to have made this, and honoured to receive praise from some hometown folks.

 

Nepas - This is good indeed - give it a try! Your friend's buckwheat binder is something I might be able to try. I have some kasha (which is essentially the same thing with a different name, I think) and might ahve to see how it does with this, in order to give it a little more in the way of credentials. And if you need a home for your old Little Chief sausage stuffer (it sounds like you don't use it anymore), let me know! I love using mine, and it would be nice to have an extra so I can get some help when making sausage - so I can make even more! lol.

 

TG26 - Thanks!

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by TasunkaWitko View Post

Good morning, guys - and thanks for the very kind words. I am really pleased with the way this one turned out, and am glad that I am able to share it with anyone who might be thinking about giving it a try. This sausage really has an old-timey aroma and taste to it, and for some reason this nostalgic atmosphere also comes into play when you're actually making it as well. Give it a shot - 4 pounds of beef to 1 pound of pork isn't that bad at all - or use venison, as I did!

 

DDF - Thanks for the information on the salt. I'll keep taht in mind when I try this again, and see if I can't tweak this just a little in order to improve it. Hogmaw!?!?! One of these days, for sure!

 

Husker - Both you and DDF probably know what I mean when I say that making this really give one a feeling as if they are carrying on some old traditions. I am very glad to have made this, and honoured to receive praise from some hometown folks.

 

Nepas - This is good indeed - give it a try! Your friend's buckwheat binder is something I might be able to try. I have some kasha (which is essentially the same thing with a different name, I think) and might ahve to see how it does with this, in order to give it a little more in the way of credentials. And if you need a home for your old Little Chief sausage stuffer (it sounds like you don't use it anymore), let me know! I love using mine, and it would be nice to have an extra so I can get some help when making sausage - so I can make even more! lol.

 

TG26 - Thanks!

 

 

Thanks for offering my old stuffer tube a new home but i will keep it. It goes with my original Luhr Jenson little chief from 1976 (which i still have)

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

>>>It goes with my original Luhr Jenson little chief from 1976 (which i still have)<<<

 

that's pretty awesome - those 'chiefs really will last a lifetime, if a person takes care of them - kind of like the story of the sausage bowl, above ~

 

i know i plan on keeping mine around as long as i can, and hopefully one of my kids will be using it! first.gif

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by TasunkaWitko View Post

>>>It goes with my original Luhr Jenson little chief from 1976 (which i still have)<<<

 

that's pretty awesome - those 'chiefs really will last a lifetime, if a person takes care of them - kind of like the story of the sausage bowl, above ~

 

i know i plan on keeping mine around as long as i can, and hopefully one of my kids will be using it! first.gif


Funny how we hang on to certain things and other things we do away with.

 

There is my old Luhr Jenson on the top shelf. Took good car of it over the years, all original with one small dent at the bottom. I had the box but it went back to wood dust..LOL

1000

 

 

I have an Old Smokey to.

1000

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

Just a quick footnote to this pictorial: I took a chub out of the freezer this past weekend, thawed it in the refrigerator overnight and gave it a try.

 
I'm not sure if the elapsed time (a month or so) gave the spices a chance to equalise, or if some other factor came into play, but it seemed to me that the flavours were in much better balance on this tasting. The garlic was much more pronounced and the bologna even seemed much, much closer to "just right" where saltiness was concerned. I still wish I would have applied a little more smoke, but once again, that'smy failure and not the fault of the recipe.
 
The other flavours and spices - pepper, coriander; even the brown sugar and beer - were still right there, and hadn't diminished at all. I really don't have any better way to say it, except to say that everything seemed to have come into almost-perfect balance.
 
With part of the chub, I sliced it a little thicker than "thick-cut" bologna, and fried the slices in a pan for a sandwich. The slices also browned very well, which is important; the pink, cured-meat colour went very well with the caramelised browns. This idea turned out to be very, very good, and it brought the flavours out even more, along with a slightly-crisp texture for the surface of the slices, which held together perfectly, even as little pockets of fat rendred out.
 
Based on this, I probably wouldn't add too much garlic and salt to the amounts listed in the recipe; maybe just a pinch or two, but that would be all, and only because of my personal tastes. I think anyone trying this would do quite well using the amounts listed.
post #11 of 12
looks great as always. Will have to get out my tube and ram rod and give it a try.
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

definitely worth the effort!

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