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Silicone

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Like many I am losing smoke from the door on my master forge. I went to both home depot and lowes today to get a oven seal kit, but they don't keep them in stock. So I found 3M fire block sealant, can I use this to put around the doors? Thanks2012-07-05 14.18.33.jpg

post #2 of 18

I'm not familiar with that product and not sure if it would put a dangerous residue to the products you are smoking.

Here is the product I purchase, Rutland's High Heat Sealant. For door gaps it works well to lay a bead of the sealant and then lay Saran Wrap over the sealant and close the door overnight to dry. This will form a perfect gasket to where the the gap was... In the morning simply remove the Saran Wrap and start smoking!

 

High Heat caulking.JPG
 

post #3 of 18

If the tube doesn't say something about being rated to a temp of 500 degrees or something like that, I would just go get a tube from an auto supply store.  I got clear silicone for mine because I didn't want to have to look at a red or black bead even though they are rated at a higher temp.  I noticed the red and black stuff says it works up to 600 degrees.  If my smoker gets to 600 degrees, something has gone terribly wrong.  The clear is good to 500 degrees.

post #4 of 18

Never seen that. I use this.

 

Permatex_High_Temp_RTV_Silicone.jpg

post #5 of 18

Is everyone comfortable using the auto gaket materials in their smokers? 

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

This what I have found about it, I have already bought it so I guess I'll try it.

 

A 1 component, noncombustible draft, smoke, and fire blocking sealant, designed to resist high temperatures and smoke passage in nonrated residential construction. It is used to seal interior construction voids around wires, pipes, HAC ducts and vents, in wood or steel framed nonrated construction. May also be used around chimney, fireplace, and other framing gaps. Meets ASTM E136 current 2003 International Building Code (IBC), 2003 International Residential Code (IRC), 2003 International Residential Mechanical Code, 2003 International Fuel Gas Code, and NFPA 5000 smoke and fireblocking requirements. Water based product, should not be exposed to water. Gray in color. 10.1 fl. oz. cartridge. Service temperature 1380 F. (750 C).

post #7 of 18

DON'T use... it dries hard I believe.

 

 

Ditto Alelover

 

 

This has held up on my firebox well.

650°

 

2312823730041211880S600x600Q85.jpg

 

Had some pretty big fires and no problems yet

 

 

 

20120115249.JPG

 

 

Heres a PDF on 3m Fire Block Sealant

 

 

 

I would not use it, I think it dries hard like this rutland below

2970182260041211880S600x600Q85.jpg
This can be used inside the firebox, just as long as there's no movement, I sealed a missed weld on my firebox to chamber and it's still holding but would not use it for holding on glass rope or sealing leaky doors.

post #8 of 18

The Rutland product I posted and have been using for 10 plus years dries to a flexible, rubbery feel to it.
 

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by MossyMO View Post

The Rutland product I posted and have been using for 10 plus years dries to a flexible, rubbery feel to it.
 

 

 

Yeas the Rutland Silicone will.

I just want to make sure folks don't get the Stove and Gasket cement.

A lot of guys see the Rutland name and just grab it not realizing there are different types.

Glad you pointed that out I should have been more specific in my post.

 

The Stove and Gasket will work inside a fire box, withstands 2,000° I have used this.

Rutlands RTV Silicone withstands 500° Mossymo has had success with this product

Permatex withstands 650° I have used this to hold glass rope on my firebox door and to seal my smoke chamber.

post #10 of 18

The FB 136 fire block sealant won't flex.  I have the same stuff, and I only use it to seal holes in my firebox where the stamped sheet metal left a gap.  Use the Rutland RTV.

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 

Well I took the stuff back to Home depot, I ordered a fireplace door gasket from lowes, so it will be in Tuesday. I had to pay an extra 10.00 for 2 day shipping because I need it this coming weekend and no one around me carried it. Oh well, at least I'll have it. Thanks guys for stopping me before I tried using the other stuff.

post #12 of 18

Just thought I'd revive this old thread to mention that I've found a NEW higher temp RTV silicone.......for a few cents more, i found RTV rated at 750f.  Seems that the general consensus is that there is no problem with using Silicone RTV.

 

just wondering if there is any high temp epoxy that is recomended for smokers?? or any high temp cement based fillers??

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by expat smoker View Post

Just thought I'd revive this old thread to mention that I've found a NEW higher temp RTV silicone.......for a few cents more, i found RTV rated at 750f.  Seems that the general consensus is that there is no problem with using Silicone RTV.

 

just wondering if there is any high temp epoxy that is recomended for smokers?? or any high temp cement based fillers??

 

http://www.rutland.com/productinfo/black-furnace-cement.html

 

Check this out..... I have used it.... Good stuff.....  Dave

post #14 of 18

I just used a fireplace 3/8 rope gasket and the fireplace adhesive to get it to stick the the door.  Was really easy and didn't leave a mess.

post #15 of 18

Reviving this thread.

Also just bought some of this stuff from Home Depot because they didn't have the red RTV.  I am going to go get some of that tomorrow at a local auto parts store but based on reading a couple of comments here, do you guys think this stuff will work to seal a fairly large gap in the firebox on a Brinkman Trailmaster Limited Edition?  You put the 2 halves of the smokebox together and there is easily as much as a 1/4 gap so I need to fill it with something that will really take up the space well.  I'm thinking it won't matter much if it doesn't flex because it's not a door that is opening and closing, I'm sort of trying to weld the gap shut.

post #16 of 18

Just go buy the red permatex chalk in the auto section, clean the surface of the door real well and lay a good bead od chalk down, on the door cover the area with saran wrap then close the door and let it cure for a day or two  then open dor and remove the saran wrap.

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by pahunter53 View Post
 

Just go buy the red permatex chalk in the auto section, clean the surface of the door real well and lay a good bead od chalk down, on the door cover the area with saran wrap then close the door and let it cure for a day or two  then open dor and remove the saran wrap.

Actually, I went ahead and gave the 3m stuff a go.  the white papers on it specifically cite repairing cracked fire bricks and wood stoves as a use for it and it's supposed to be good up to 750 degrees CELSIUS so should be great for the firebox.  I won't be surprised if it doesn't do well for sealing the doors but we will find out!  someone has to be the guinea pig!!!!

post #18 of 18
The fire block stuff is usually a latex style , stay away from products that say chalk or cement, they won't make a very nice seal.

The red permatex high heat sealant works very well, The stuff I got from advance auto says 1000 degrees right on the tube and even states that it can be used for oven gasket, non toxic. Only problem is it's red. The Rutland silicon sealant didn't work to bad for me, even though it's only good to around 550 or so, it looks much better being black.

I made the same mistake Sqwib mentioned picking up a tube of Rutland one time and spend the next day scrapping the stuff back off. It looks exactly like the first tube I bought, but was latex instead of silicon, what a mess.
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