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Spicy Pepperoni - Page 2

post #21 of 39
Thread Starter 

Hey no worries Y'all (Thats southern) HAHA

 

I aint very good at math either so thems just my guestimates. Adjust the salt/sugar to your taste.

 

MTQ is a mix of salt, sugar, sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and normally used at 1.5 tsp per lb of meat. Now i normally dont use MTQ and do small batches so Y'all (thats southern) gotta figure it out.... NYUK NYUK NYUK

 

Fight nice

 

hit.gif

post #22 of 39
Thread Starter 

hit.gifhit.gif

 

icon_eek.gif

post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by nepas View Post

Hey no worries Y'all (Thats southern) HAHA

 

I aint very good at math either so thems just my guestimates. Adjust the salt/sugar to your taste.

 

MTQ is a mix of salt, sugar, sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and normally used at 1.5 tsp per lb of meat. Now i normally dont use MTQ and do small batches so Y'all (thats southern) gotta figure it out.... NYUK NYUK NYUK

 

Fight nice

 

hit.gif


LOL---I think we got it nailed down now---no fighting was needed.

 

BTW NEPAS:  Are you practicing for your move, Y'all ??  biggrin.gif

 

Bear

 

post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post




LOL---I think we got it nailed down now---no fighting was needed.

 

 

 

Bear

 



 

This.

post #25 of 39
Thread Starter 

MTQ eek.gif

 

 

The pepperoni is cooling.

 

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DSC00066.JPG

 

post #26 of 39

Looks great would love to see a slice or two after they are done!!

post #27 of 39
Thread Starter 

I'll get some pics this weekend. The pepps are vac to go on a road trip.

 

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post #28 of 39

Looks real good NEPAS !!!

 

Your recipe is very similar to the one I called Pepperoni, that I made 15 months ago.

It tasted great, but it really wasn't much like Pepperoni.

Maybe you can tell me what difference in our two recipes causes yours to taste like Pepperoni, and mine more like a beef stick? Mine pretty much came from the Morton Curing Guide.

 

Here it is:

 

 

Here are the contents:
3 LBS ground beef (80/20)
4 1/2 level tsp of Tender Quick
1 3/4 tsp of Black Pepper
1 tsp of Mustard Seed
1 tsp of Fennel Seed (slightly crushed)
1 tsp of Crushed Red Pepper
1/2 tsp of Anise Seed
1/2 tsp of Garlic Powder
1/2 tsp of Italian Seasoning
 
Mix all ingredients real, real good, and roll into two or three 2" diameter logs. Wrap these in plastic wrap, and put in fridge over night (36˚ to 40˚). 

 

Link to the rest that thread:

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forum/thread/94897/pepperoni-cured-smoked-and-qviewed

 

 

Thank You Much,

Bear

post #29 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post

Looks real good NEPAS !!!

 

Your recipe is very similar to the one I called Pepperoni, that I made 15 months ago.

It tasted great, but it really wasn't much like Pepperoni.

Maybe you can tell me what difference in our two recipes causes yours to taste like Pepperoni, and mine more like a beef stick? Mine pretty much came from the Morton Curing Guide.

 

Here it is:

 

 

Here are the contents:
3 LBS ground beef (80/20)
4 1/2 level tsp of Tender Quick
1 3/4 tsp of Black Pepper
1 tsp of Mustard Seed
1 tsp of Fennel Seed (slightly crushed)
1 tsp of Crushed Red Pepper
1/2 tsp of Anise Seed
1/2 tsp of Garlic Powder
1/2 tsp of Italian Seasoning
 
Mix all ingredients real, real good, and roll into two or three 2" diameter logs. Wrap these in plastic wrap, and put in fridge over night (36˚ to 40˚). 

 

Link to the rest that thread:

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forum/thread/94897/pepperoni-cured-smoked-and-qviewed

 

 

Thank You Much,

Bear


Thats their version of  MTQ pepperoni.

 

Leave the Italian season out. Makes it to busy with herbs.

 

post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by nepas View Post


Thats their version of  MTQ pepperoni.

 

Leave the Italian season out. Makes it to busy with herbs.

 


Thanks NEPAS !

 

That one above was great, but not really like Pepperoni. Actually I ended up making very small changes & it became the base recipe for my Beef Sticks, Bear Logs, and Bear Loaf.

 

I gotta try the Pepperoni Recipe you sent me last week!!!!

 

Bear

 

post #31 of 39
Thread Starter 

Yeah i like your Bear logs/loafs

post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by nepas View Post

Yeah i like your Bear logs/loafs


LOL---Yeah, but I'll bet it will work better if you don't jam your smoker too full, like I did that last time!

Next time only one per shelf!!!

I learned my lesson!

 

Bear

 

post #33 of 39

It looks great it will be good on a pizza  imagesCAMS1DE6.jpg

post #34 of 39

What happens if I omit MTQ or Cure #1 all together? Apologize for the noobie question, but I'm just starting to try my hand at jerky and meat sticks. If I don't use a cure, that just means I have a shorter "shelf life" with them and it requires them to be frozen or refrigerated at all times correct? Or does the curing salts do something else that I'm not aware of. Thanks for the help.

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by KrayzieLuke View Post

What happens if I omit MTQ or Cure #1 all together? Apologize for the noobie question, but I'm just starting to try my hand at jerky and meat sticks. If I don't use a cure, that just means I have a shorter "shelf life" with them and it requires them to be frozen or refrigerated at all times correct? Or does the curing salts do something else that I'm not aware of. Thanks for the help.


 



Hey Luke, you will need the cure to prevent bacterial growth while smoking at lower temperatures. Unless you plan on hot smoking it and getting the internal temp up to 140f within 4 hours, you would run the risk of botulism poisoning. It is relatively simple to do, but make sure you understand this part before you go ahead.

here is some info from NEPAS on another thread : http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/152412/question-on-curing

CURES - Cures are used in sausage products for color and flavor development as well as retarding the development of bacteria in
the low temperature environment of smoked meats.
Salt and sugar both cure meat by osmosis. In addition to drawing the water from the food, they dehydrate and kill the bacteria that make food spoil. In general, though, use of the word "cure" refers to processing the meat with either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate.
The primary and most important reason to use cures is to prevent BOTULISM POISONING (Food poisoning). It is very important that any kind of meat or sausage that will be cooked and smoked at low temperature be cured. To trigger botulism poisoning, the requirements are quite simple - lack of oxygen, the presence of moisture, and temperatures in range of 40-140° F. When smoking meats, the heat and smoke eliminates the oxygen. The meats have moisture and are traditionally smoked and cooked in the low ranges of 90 to 185° F. As you can see, these are ideal conditions for food poisoning if you don't use cures. There are two types of commercially used cures.


Prague Powder #1
Also called Insta-Cure and Modern Cure. Cures are used to prevent meats from spoiling when being cooked or smoked at low temperatures (under 200 degrees F). This cure is 1 part sodium nitrite (6.25%) and 16 parts salt (93.75%) and are combined and crystallized to assure even distribution. As the meat temperate rises during processing, the sodium nitrite changes to nitric oxide and starts to ‘gas out’ at about 130 degrees F. After the smoking /cooking process is complete only about 10-20% of the original nitrite remains. As the product is stored and later reheated for consumption, the decline of nitrite continues. 4 ounces of Prague powder #1 is required to cure 100 lbs of meat. A more typical measurement for home use is 1 level tsp per 5 lbs of meat. Mix with cold water, then mix into meat like you would mix seasonings into meat.


Prague Powder #2
Used to dry-cure products. Prague powder #2 is a mixture of 1 part sodium nitrite, .64 parts sodium nitrate and 16 parts salt. (1 oz. of sodium nitrite with .64 oz. of sodium nitrate to each lb. of salt.)
It is primarily used in dry-curing Use with products that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration. This cure, which is sodium nitrate, acts like a time release, slowly breaking down into sodium nitrite, then into nitric oxide. This allows you to dry cure products that take much longer to cure. A cure with sodium nitrite would dissipate too quickly.
Use 1 oz. of cure for 25 lbs. of meat or 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lbs. of meat when mixing with meat.
When using a cure in a brine solution, follow a recipe.
post #36 of 39

great job,gonna give it a try

post #37 of 39
Maybe I read over it but I don't see an amount for cure # 1 needed if you don't use MTQ.
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by J Blackburn View Post

Maybe I read over it but I don't see an amount for cure # 1 needed if you don't use MTQ.

For which recipe?  If you're talking about the original one at the top, made by Nepas, you'd need 2.25 grams of cure #1 for the 2 pound batch he is referring to.

post #39 of 39
Thanks CrankyBuzzard!
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