Who roasts their own coffee on their BBQ or Grill?

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tallbm

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There's no better compliment, TBM.

Below are coffees in my spreadsheet from 2021 that are labeled "Wet Processed." I don't recall less chaff, but I wasn't looking for it.
Central AmericaEl SalvadorBalsamo-Quezaltepec, Municipality NejapaSHGFinca El CipresWet process, Patio Sun-dried
AfricaBurundiMururui Hill in Sogestal Kayanza Northern BurundiA1Dusangirijambo Co-opWet Processed, sun dried raised beds
Central AmericaEl SalvadorBalsamo-Quezaltepec, Municipality NejapaSHGFinca El CipresWet process, Patio Sun-dried
Central AmericaEl Salvador19.45 oz Balsamo-Quezaltepec, Municipality Nejapa + 2.55 oz Ataco, AhuachapanSHGFinca El CipresWet process, Patio Sun-dried
Central AmericaEl SalvadorAtaco, AhuachapanSHGFinca Villa Maria (Dona Maria Alcira Celis)Wet Processed,Patio Sun-dried

Hmm. Guess I'm going to have to play closer attention to my chaff showers. Below is what I have left in green "cherries." I typically roast one coffee at a time, unless I don't care for one, then I mix it with something else. None are labeled "wet processed."
South AmericaPeruHuabalSHBJaen GranjerosMechanically Washed, Sun Dried
Central AmericaCosta RicaDota, TarrazuSHBEl ConquistadorMechanically Washed, Sun Dried
South AmericaBrazilLambari, Minas GeraisEstateAmecafe CooperativeDry Process (natural), patio sun-dried
South AmericaBrazilCerrado MineiroEstatePatroncinio Ricardo VagneDry Process (natural), patio sun-dried
MexicoMexicoSierra Madre de ChiapasSHGCoop FarmingMechanically Washed, Sun Dried
South AmericaPeruEl Paraiso Yoner ArevaloSHBYoner AreveloMechanically Washed, Sun Dried
Will be interesting if u can solve the mystery with some upcoming roasts :D
 
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tallbm

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Yep. I'm going to add a "Chaff Level" to my spreadsheet to keep track.
Nice, see below for the ones I bought. The company is called Fus Light so I wonder if that means no fuss no chaff beans :P
Where you get them?
I got them on amazon here:

Not cheap but hey I get exactly what I was looking for and they are a gift so no biggy :)
 
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noboundaries

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I've found that shopping at Sweet Maria's is kinda like shopping at Costco: buy it when you see it or it might be gone the next time you look. They have Yirga Cheffe in stock. I'm smacking my hand away from ordering it because I've already got an 18 mo stock of other beans. The coffee below is wet processed.

 
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Hockeydudde

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I was going to ask where you get your coffee. Sweet Maria's stock has been so sparse lately.
A friend recommended I check out Happy Mug, but I haven't yet. I've only got about 4 lbs left and it's all espresso blend, so it's about time for me to order.
 
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noboundaries

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I was going to ask where you get your coffee. Sweet Maria's stock has been so sparse lately.
Sweet Maria's in Oakland is only 90 miles as the crow flies from my house. Shipping is the same whether I order 5 lbs or 20 lbs. I generally order 15-20 lbs at a time of 5 lb bags of different coffees.

Before the pandemic/supply chain issues I usually ordered when I was on my last 5 lb bag. Now I'll start looking for the flavor profiles I like when I'm down to 10-15 lbs. I'm over twice that amount.

The flavor profiles and tasting wheels are what I use to make purchase decisions. Central and South America coffees generally fit what I like. But that Yirga Cheffe is singing to me. Dang.
 

Hockeydudde

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Sweet Maria's in Oakland is only 90 miles as the crow flies from my house. Shipping is the same whether I order 5 lbs or 20 lbs. I generally order 15-20 lbs at a time of 5 lb bags of different coffees.

Before the pandemic/supply chain issues I usually ordered when I was on my last 5 lb bag. Now I'll start looking for the flavor profiles I like when I'm down to 10-15 lbs. I'm over twice that amount.

The flavor profiles and tasting wheels are what I use to make purchase decisions. Central and South America coffees generally fit what I like. But that Yirga Cheffe is singing to me. Dang.
I ignored the yirg recommendation, because I also tend away from African coffees. Native I'll try it out they have it when I order.
 
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noboundaries

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Update on chaff from dry process coffee. I roasted the following coffee this morning:
BrazilLambari, Minas GeraisEstateAmecafe CooperativeDry Process (natural), patio sun-dried

Dry Process Chaff Result for the above coffee? Chaff shower. Also, it was BY FAR the worst roast consistency I've ever seen. WAAAAY too many "quakers" (beans that were picked too early and green. They don't roast worth a ----). The final roast level ranged from City to Light Vienna.

For those unfamiliar with roast levels, City is a lighter roast, Light Vienna a darker roast. There are five levels of roast from City to Light Vienna (City, City+, Full City, Full City+, Light Vienna). Normally I only see a difference of one or two levels when I roast coffee.

More confounding was there were almost no audible cracks. The sound of those cracks is what I use these days to tell me when the roast is complete. The first cracks (popcorn popping) I did hear sounded like second cracks (Rice Krispies). Man, oh man. That was one confusing roast.

We'll see how it tastes in a day or two.

Ray

Edit: That was my 13th roast this year. Figures. (Insert eerie music here)
 
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fltsfshr

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Fun reading this thread. I was in the specialty coffee business many years ago. There were only a few of us in it back then. I sold the business and moved to Florida. Guy who bought it from me sold out to you know who. I'd love to find some Yemen Mocha or Blue Lintong. I still have my sample roaster and my blend notebook.
 

tallbm

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Update on chaff from dry process coffee. I roasted the following coffee this morning:
BrazilLambari, Minas GeraisEstateAmecafe CooperativeDry Process (natural), patio sun-dried

Dry Process Chaff Result for the above coffee? Chaff shower. Also, it was BY FAR the worst roast consistency I've ever seen. WAAAAY too many "quakers" (beans that were picked too early and green. They don't roast worth a ----). The final roast level ranged from City to Light Vienna.

For those unfamiliar with roast levels, City is a lighter roast, Light Vienna a darker roast. There are five levels of roast from City to Light Vienna (City, City+, Full City, Full City+, Light Vienna). Normally I only see a difference of one or two levels when I roast coffee.

More confounding was there were almost no audible cracks. The sound of those cracks is what I use these days to tell me when the roast is complete. The first cracks (popcorn popping) I did hear sounded like second cracks (Rice Krispies). Man, oh man. That was one confusing roast.

We'll see how it tastes in a day or two.

Ray

Edit: That was my 13th roast this year. Figures. (Insert eerie music here)

So I did another 8 ounces of this roast and saw more chaff than I did the first time. The first time I did it just after dark and this time I did it in broad daylight.
It still was little chaff that I bet I was able to easily blew 90% of it out while just roasting in the skillet with a wood spoon.
So little that I didnt even bother trying to remove more chaff when I went to cool in a colander over a fan.

In the past with different beans I had to remove plenty chaff while cooling in the colander. Not this specific bean and brand though.
I have another pound to fool with but I likely wont do any roasting on it for 3 weeks or so, if even then.
I have my yearly deer/hog hunt coming up in early October and the hunt + processing will take priority over any bean roasting I may think of. Plus my girlfriend has to finish the fresh 8oz I just handed her a few days ago and she doesn't drink through it too fast at all.
 
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fltsfshr

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There are a lot of different ways to brew coffee. Chemex was my favorite hand pour drip.
Couple thoughts on brewing. Always start with cold water and bring it up just to a boil. It retains more oxygen that way. Best water temp for brewing is 188 degrees. Use enough coffee per 6 oz cup. If you use to little it will be bitter as flavor washes out first and oils and waxes second. If you see an oil slick in your cup it's either from brewing too hot or the beans were old. There are now makers that allow you set your bloom time, your brewing temp very accurately. Breville makes a great one.
 
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Retired Spook

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Fun reading this thread. I was in the specialty coffee business many years ago. There were only a few of us in it back then. I sold the business and moved to Florida. Guy who bought it from me sold out to you know who. I'd love to find some Yemen Mocha or Blue Lintong. I still have my sample roaster and my blend notebook.
When I was a youngster I used to drive 18-wheelers and I would pick up trailer loads of 180-lb burlap sacks of green coffee (loaded and unloaded by hand with coffee hooks - a 2-man job) from the Brooklyn piers and then deliver it to - ready for this? - Duncan Donuts' coffee roasting facility in NJ.

Now, I know Duncan Donuts was not, and is not, gourmet or specialty coffee, and never will be, but I got to see the entire roasting, blending and tasting process first hand. The smell of roasting coffee is addictive.

Later in life (after a much needed career change) I got a part time job in a Starbucks in Seattle circa 1991 (before Starbucks was famous) to fill in some unused time, and I learned how to make perfect espresso on a real espresso machine (they use robots now). I even became a secret shopper for them!

Now, I use a Melita pour over and a coarser grind of Colombian Supremo! :emoji_laughing:

Back in the day it was possible to buy some excellent coffees but these days I've become cynical and skeptical - everything is marketing and jacked-up prices.
 
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noboundaries

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My stomach can't handle black coffee anymore after drinking it for decades. I need creamer to tame it. Throw in lactose intolerance, and creamer options are limited. I was using a lite coconut milk for years and then realized quite recently it was causing a different set of inflammation problems. I'm not giving up coffee, especially since I have 40 lbs of green Arabica beans to roast.

I just started experimenting with creamers. The first one tried was Silk Almond creamer. Too sweet and tastes like Irish Cream, which was a surprise, a pleasant one. I did a 50-50 mix of the creamer and Kirkland Canadian whiskey over ice, and it tasted EXACTLY like the cheaper Irish Creams. I'll remember that little experiment when the holidays arrive. It hides the coffee flavors, though, so the search continues.

I am going to try an Oat Milk creamer next.

Friggin' stomach.

I'm open to suggestions.

Ray
 

fltsfshr

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There's a coffee out there that is very low in acid. Maragogipie. Very large bean. Mild, slightly woody. You might try that. Sometimes it's called elephant bean. Good stuff comes from Nicaragua, Costa Rica down that way.
 
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tallbm

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My stomach can't handle black coffee anymore after drinking it for decades. I need creamer to tame it. Throw in lactose intolerance, and creamer options are limited. I was using a lite coconut milk for years and then realized quite recently it was causing a different set of inflammation problems. I'm not giving up coffee, especially since I have 40 lbs of green Arabica beans to roast.

I just started experimenting with creamers. The first one tried was Silk Almond creamer. Too sweet and tastes like Irish Cream, which was a surprise, a pleasant one. I did a 50-50 mix of the creamer and Kirkland Canadian whiskey over ice, and it tasted EXACTLY like the cheaper Irish Creams. I'll remember that little experiment when the holidays arrive. It hides the coffee flavors, though, so the search continues.

I am going to try an Oat Milk creamer next.

Friggin' stomach.

I'm open to suggestions.

Ray
Not sure but u can buy lactose free whole milk to avoid that part. It's not creamer but something :)
 

noboundaries

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Not sure but u can buy lactose free whole milk to avoid that part. It's not creamer but something :)
Thanks, TBM. Tried it. That's all we drink, or I should say, that's all my wife drinks.

BUT, because of your suggestion, I looked up lactose-free half and half, plus lactose free heavy cream that isn't coconut milk. BOTH EXIST! Who knew? (Insert head-smack DOH! here). Definitely gonna find them and try them. Thanks again.
 
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