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Trouble in paradise: Dry pork ribs on a Weber Premium

binxpercy

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Hi all! I smoked St. Louis style ribs twice so far on my new Weber Premium and they cooked really fast both times. I watched that temp like a hawk and kept it around 225 for most of the cook like I always did with my Weber Classic. Both times with the Premium the ribs cooked much faster than on the Classic and nearly dried out. I trusted the same Maverick thermometer I used with the Classic. Used a water pan and spritz every time etc. Any thoughts? Have y’all had different kettles read the same temp and yet cook the same meats faster or slower?? I feel like there’s some voodoo at work here… Thanks.
 

SmokinEdge

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Same amount of coals in each cooker? Could be a horse power thing. More heat is more heat, even if the temp is the same.
 

pineywoods

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Have you checked the actual smoker temperature vs what the thermometer shows they could be very different and did you ever check it on the Weber Classic? That could be the difference in them
 

unclebubbas bbq

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Are you cooking indirect with a slow n sear or something similar or are you cooking directly over the coals?
 

binxpercy

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Same amount of coals in each cooker? Could be a horse power thing. More heat is more heat, even if the temp is the same.
You know actually that might be the problem. I light about ten coals and add them to a Weber basket of unlit ones. I adjust the vents to bring it down to temp. You think more coals being lit would dry the ribs out even if the temp stays at 225?
 

binxpercy

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Are you cooking indirect with a slow n sear or something similar or are you cooking directly over the coals?
I’m cooking indirect. No slow and sear. I use a single Weber charcoal basket. Light about ten coals, add them to the basket with unlit ones. I use a water pan too. I make sure to rotate the ribs too especially if I’m using a rib rack with more than one rack to vary distance from the heat.
 

binxpercy

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Have you checked the actual smoker temperature vs what the thermometer shows they could be very different and did you ever check it on the Weber Classic? That could be the difference in them
Hm… I don’t have a thermometer installed on my Classic. I always used my Maverick grill level thermometer with the Classic. I use the same Maverick with my Premium, which does have a grill cover thermometer too. Yes there’s a big difference in what they read, but the cover thermometer ends up right above my Weber charcoal basket. I keep the meat on the other side of the grill and under the cover vent. I keep my Maverick closer to the meat, on the cool side of the grill.
 

unclebubbas bbq

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I will typically put my charcoal in the basket and use a starter cube on one end, I don't add lit coals. Also you may want to try wrapping them once your rub has set, it should retain the moisture at that point. But I have found that my ribs do cook faster on the kettle than on my smoker
 

JCAP

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I got some spare ribs from a place once that were pretty much all bone. Disappointing.

But were they ready to come off by the bend test? Wonder if they maybe were not quite done yet?
 

gmc2003

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Like unclebubbas bbq unclebubbas bbq posted. Whether I'm using my charcoal baskets or the SnS. I start the coals in the basket using a Weber starter cube in the corner surrounded by about 4 briquettes. I don't temp my ribs to see if they're done or not. I let the bend test tell me they're done. If you are temping them then 195* is about the right temp for bite thru, and 205 for FOTB. Also I've experienced two almost identical racks of ribs cooking on the same kettle take different times to finish.

The Bend test: Pick the ribs up on the thicker end about a 1/3 of the way down. They should fall freely to about a 90*+ angle. The bark should start cracking. If your going for FOTB then make sure you do the bend test over the grill. You don't want half your rib falling on the ground.
1638975503463.png
 

binxpercy

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I got some spare ribs from a place once that were pretty much all bone. Disappointing.

But were they ready to come off by the bend test? Wonder if they maybe were not quite done yet?
Mine were definitely done. And quick. Passed the bend test, meat pulled way far from the ends of the bones.
 

binxpercy

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Like unclebubbas bbq unclebubbas bbq posted. Whether I'm using my charcoal baskets or the SnS. I start the coals in the basket using a Weber starter cube in the corner surrounded by about 4 briquettes. I don't temp my ribs to see if they're done or not. I let the bend test tell me they're done. If you are temping them then 195* is about the right temp for bite thru, and 205 for FOTB. Also I've experienced two almost identical racks of ribs cooking on the same kettle take different times to finish.

The Bend test: Pick the ribs up on the thicker end about a 1/3 of the way down. They should fall freely to about a 90*+ angle. The bark should start cracking. If your going for FOTB then make sure you do the bend test over the grill. You don't want half your rib falling on the ground.
View attachment 518524
Thanks for the tips! I’ll try the tumbleweed under a few coals in the basket to start next time. And yeah I guess a lot of it is just judging by look and feel I’d like you’re saying cook times for the same thing in the same grill can vary so much.

Nice ribs by the way! What else is on your grill? Something roasting in foil?
 

gmc2003

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Thanks for the tips! I’ll try the tumbleweed under a few coals in the basket to start next time. And yeah I guess a lot of it is just judging by look and feel I’d like you’re saying cook times for the same thing in the same grill can vary so much.

Nice ribs by the way! What else is on your grill? Something roasting in foil?
Roasting in the foil. That would be potatoes. One Russet and one sweet.

Chris
 

noboundaries

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225F? Dry ribs? Cooked really fast? Hmm.

It is just about impossible to overcook spareribs to the point they are dry. An overcooked rack of spareribs will have a stringy bark and a mushy, moist interior. The bones will pull out cleanly.

Follow all the advice you think is best, but it sounds like they were underdone and needed longer in the smoker.

I've smoked ribs from 225F to 375F. Did an untrimmed 6.5 lb rack this past weekend at around 325F. They were probe tender, moist, and slightly overdone in 4 hours. My wife likes them FOTB so I let them go 30 min longer until the bones just pulled right out. They were succulent but not how I like my ribs.

All the fire advice is great, but dry ribs are underdone ribs be because the tough, dry tasting, connective-tissue collagen has not melted from heat and time.
 
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binxpercy

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225F? Dry ribs? Cooked really fast? Hmm.

It is just about impossible to overcook spareribs to the point they are dry. An overcooked rack of spareribs will have a stringy bark and a mushy, moist interior. The bones will pull out cleanly.

Follow all the advice you think is best, but it sounds like they were underdone and needed longer in the smoker.

I've smoked ribs from 225F to 375F. Did an untrimmed 6.5 lb rack this past weekend at around 325F. They were probe tender, moist, and slightly overdone in 4 hours. My wife likes them FOTB so I let them go 30 min longer until the bones just pulled right out. They were succulent but not how I like my ribs.

All the fire advice is great, but dry ribs are underdone ribs be because the tough, dry tasting, connective-tissue collagen has not melted from heat and time.
Thanks. Good to know! 👍🏻 With mine the baby back ribs were pulled really far back and the meat was about as dry as those bones. I had bones in the skinny ends literally falling out without my touching them because the meat had shrunk that far. Should I up the temp toward the end to melt that collagen?
 

SmokinAl

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Thanks. Good to know! 👍🏻 With mine the baby back ribs were pulled really far back and the meat was about as dry as those bones. I had bones in the skinny ends literally falling out without my touching them because the meat had shrunk that far. Should I up the temp toward the end to melt that collagen?
My advice would be to try STL’s the next time.
The problem with BB’s is there is usually a big piece of loin meat on the top, and it should be cooked to 140. So when you take it to 200 it is dried out because it is too lean.
Al
 

radioguy

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I dont spritz, or foil. I will turn them a few times. when they are passing the bend test, sauce them good and put them in foil, wrap in a towel, in a cooler...30+ minutes rest ...magic. 20201018_113743.jpg
 

noboundaries

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Thanks. Good to know! 👍🏻 With mine the baby back ribs were pulled really far back and the meat was about as dry as those bones. I had bones in the skinny ends literally falling out without my touching them because the meat had shrunk that far. Should I up the temp toward the end to melt that collagen?
The original post was St. Louis cut spareribs. Baby Backs are a leaner, more ornery and temperamental part of the piggy. I ALWAYS wrap BBs, but rarely do them because spares are so much easier and much more friendly and forgiving.
 

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