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The Old Ways

kc5tpy

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Hello folks.  Things seem to be getting confused here from what I originally meant.  What I was talking about WAS the hard times!  Times when you made soap and such BECAUSE it was cheaper and you had no other choice.  The fact you and your family SURVIVED the hard times is just the thing I mean.  I mean ROCK BOTTOM when you can make a meal from 6-7 with 1 chicken wing and 2 potatoes.  
  With a few creative ideas you can feed a family of 4 with a can of Spam and a few dried beans.  Canning when you could and so on.  Anyone find a way to pass these things on?  Most kids think veggies come from a can and many city kids have never seen a live cow.  I just don't feel we have the opportunity to pass these things to the younger generations.  Schools certainly would not allow us to show how to skin a rabbit.  Just curious if someone has found a way to pass on the skills.  Keep Smokin!


Danny
 

red dog

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Danny I apologize if I contributed to sidetracking your discussion. And I agree completely that how we survive hard times is important knowledge to pass on to young people. I am sure when I was young my elders didn't think I was paying attention when they told the stories, but I was. So it is important to not stop trying even if you think it's falling on deaf ears. That's what is so great about his forum. We get to practice and share these things with the hope of passing that knowledge on. The young people that do listen just might be the only survivors sometime in the future.

Thanks for starting this discussion

Clay
 

gary s

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Hey Danny, I agree. # 2 son and his wife usually grow a garden, he is getting better on smoking, but that's about it. Grand kids Forget it, all they want to do is be called when it's ready. One grandson does help me till the garden and plat a little but that's about it. Just not interested in learning how to can, garden, smoke etc.  Old ways are fading . Another thing that amazes me is how many young women and some older ones can't sew .  My wife use to make my shirts and still sews all kind of things, makes curtains, bead spreads and half of her friends don't sew

Gary
 

franklin3

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Just yesterday my 13 year old grandaughter broke dpown and prepped four freezer packs of spare ribs for me while I watched on with pride.  She gutted and skinned her first wild boar at age 9.

I hear what you are all saying and I too felt the same so I did something about it.  I started doing things "the old way" myself and brought my son along, he brought his three kids along.  We do it all together from slaughter to the pantry wild and domestic game.  Canning and smoking and the children are growing up a part of it, unlike my son his son thinks this is the way everyone does it.

Its not hard, herfes the simple recipe:

MAKE the time and then TAKE the time.

its fun and rewarding,

and its never to late to start!

I bought a grinder then a stuffer then a mixer:  we started making sausage.

I bought a canner:  we started canning meats and fruits and vegetables  theres a farmers market in every city now.

A grill, then a smoker, and a membership to smoking meat forum where everyone whos anyone hangs out and shares their experiences.

One book two book dont forget the red book, or is it green now?  Theres really only one when it comes to processing meats and its older than I am.

Most of all its a family thing that you'll never regret starting up with.
 

kc5tpy

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Hello Clay.  No problem.  Not sidetracked.

Hello Gary.  I was almost 40 years old before I wore a store bought shirt.  Grandmother made them all.  All fitted shirts.  Check the price on fitted Wrangler shirts now days.  To be fair their company was upholstery and Grandpa made mattresses so HEAVY denim for welding shirts, but embroidery on the shoulders of all the dress shirts.  I think it HAS to be a GROUP.  The family kids NEED to see that other kids are interested in what is going on.  The family kids just see it as a "chore" like cleaning their room.  IF they see their peer's taking interest they will bust a gut to tell all they know to impress; and then want to learn more ( just an opinion ).

Their must be some way to pass skills to the youngsters through community organizations??  No one got a program going we can learn from as to how to set one up??

I find just teaching kids to fish or that toast can be made on a camp fire sparks a "little" interest.  Roasting hotdogs and marshmellows on an open fire.  I just can't find any way to reach a "group" of kids.  I don't have a lot of free time but I would be willing to set aside some time to share as my father-in-law does.  He LOVES it.

Any programs out there that are working?

Danny
 

red dog

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Danny I apologize if I contributed to sidetracking
 
Hello Clay.  No problem.  Not sidetracked.

Hello Gary.  I was almost 40 years old before I wore a store bought shirt.  Grandmother made them all.  All fitted shirts.  Check the price on fitted Wrangler shirts now days.  To be fair their company was upholstery and Grandpa made mattresses so HEAVY denim for welding shirts, but embroidery on the shoulders of all the dress shirts.  I think it HAS to be a GROUP.  The family kids NEED to see that other kids are interested in what is going on.  The family kids just see it as a "chore" like cleaning their room.  IF they see their peer's taking interest they will bust a gut to tell all they know to impress; and then want to learn more ( just an opinion ).

Their must be some way to pass skills to the youngsters through community organizations??  No one got a program going we can learn from as to how to set one up??

I find just teaching kids to fish or that toast can be made on a camp fire sparks a "little" interest.  Roasting hotdogs and marshmellows on an open fire.  I just can't find any way to reach a "group" of kids.  I don't have a lot of free time but I would be willing to set aside some time to share as my father-in-law does.  He LOVES it.

Any programs out there that are working?

Danny
My sister and us belong to the local dutch oven cooking society. There aren't a lot of young people involved but we do demonstrations at sporting goods and hardware stores that sell cooking supplies. Also at community events. You would be amazed at how many kids end up gathered around watching. Check with local church or youth groups and offer to do some demonstrations. Lots of them will pay for the food if you are willing to cook for them and teach the kids something. Worth a try!
 

bluewhisper

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Linda's grandson just turned 6 and he is an information sponge. He's just starting to mature enough to pay attention to something instead of wandering in a dream state. I look forward to teaching him a lot of DIY things like cooking and gardening. As it is now, for him, chicken comes in a box from McDonald's, right next to the Spiderman sippy cup.
 

ajsmokes

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I am of the younger here. I'm 35 and lived the city life as a child. But I lived very poor in my eyes. My mother didn't work due to my father's horrid abuse and physically disabling her. But she did what she had to to raise us.

I did learn how to fish and hunt rabbit. Never hunt any large game but I wasn't interested either. We could walk down the street with a rifle in our hands and go to the river to get our rabbits..

Now all of you are talking as though you have all sorts of knowledge share with the young but you're not doing that. You're sharing your experiences. None of you have put up a sign glee short tutorial explaining how to can something on this thread or how to create a small garden for people who have no clue. Don't get me wrong I really enjoy this thread. But instead of sharing nothing but experiences share some of that knowledge.

AJ
 

atomicsmoke

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None of you have put up a sign glee short tutorial explaining how to can something on this thread or how to create a small garden for people who have no clue.

AJ
Isn't this whole site a huge depository of valuable tutorials? Has canning forums, gardening forums.
 

ajsmokes

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Isn't this whole site a huge depository of valuable tutorials? Has canning forums, gardening forums.
Yes it does. But I'm talking about this specific thread. While people are reading it. It would not hurt to throw in one of those small tutorials.
 

kc5tpy

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Hello.  The thread was started to see if anyone had a working community program in place which gets children aged 6-18 interested in learning the old ways of doing things.  Something we could use as a template to try and start something like it in our communities.  To pass on the knowledge.of how things used to be done.  Also to educate kids as to where their food comes from.  A program that works through a community group like a school, church, scouts, 
.  We aren't talking about a 2 day tutorial on how to kill your first deer/hog and completely process the carcass.  We are talking about showing young kids how to smoke cheese with a soup can, a soldering iron and a cardboard box.  Something to SPARK the interest.  Something to get them WANTING to learn more.  At 35 I don't think I need to post a tutorial on how to cook a hot dog or marshmellow on a skewer over an open fire.  Or teach you how to cook your VERY OWN burger on an open fire or BBQ AND smoke it. Or even how to start a fire.  BUT! to a 6-8 yr. old city kid: ESPECIALLY from here in the U.K., those things can leave a memory that lasts for life AND could be just the spark that makes them want to learn more.  


Just a simple example:  How many younger adults pay more to buy chicken pieces because they have ZERO idea of how to cut up a whole chicken?  EASY things they should have learned as young teens.  OK!  Health and safety will not allow you to put knives in teenagers hands BUT what you can do is let them see the process and FEEL the joints before you make the cuts.

Just my opinion and thoughts.  Keep Smokin!

Danny
 

ajsmokes

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Hello.  The thread was started to see if anyone had a working community program in place which gets children aged 6-18 interested in learning the old ways of doing things.  Something we could use as a template to try and start something like it in our communities.  To pass on the knowledge.of how things used to be done.  Also to educate kids as to where their food comes from.  A program that works through a community group like a school, church, scouts, 
.  We aren't talking about a 2 day tutorial on how to kill your first deer/hog and completely process the carcass.  We are talking about showing young kids how to smoke cheese with a soup can, a soldering iron and a cardboard box.  Something to SPARK the interest.  Something to get them WANTING to learn more.  At 35 I don't think I need to post a tutorial on how to cook a hot dog or marshmellow on a skewer over an open fire.  Or teach you how to cook your VERY OWN burger on an open fire or BBQ AND smoke it. Or even how to start a fire.  BUT! to a 6-8 yr. old city kid: ESPECIALLY from here in the U.K., those things can leave a memory that lasts for life AND could be just the spark that makes them want to learn more.  


Just a simple example:  How many younger adults pay more to buy chicken pieces because they have ZERO idea of how to cut up a whole chicken?  EASY things they should have learned as young teens.  OK!  Health and safety will not allow you to put knives in teenagers hands BUT what you can do is let them see the process and FEEL the joints before you make the cuts.

Just my opinion and thoughts.  Keep Smokin!
Danny
You would be so surprised at how many ppl don't have the simple knowledge like roasting a hot dog on a stick over an open flame. Here in the good ole city of Omaha, nebraska people would rather throw the dog in a microwave. So yes telling a 35 year old how to do those things isn't as far fetched as one may think.
 

diggingdogfarm

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The thread was started to see if anyone had a working community program in place which gets children aged 6-18 interested in learning the old ways of doing things.  Something we could use as a template to try and start something like it in our communities.  To pass on the knowledge.of how things used to be done.  Also to educate kids as to where their food comes from.  A program that works through a community group like a school, church, scouts....

Just a simple example:  How many younger adults pay more to buy chicken pieces because they have ZERO idea of how to cut up a whole chicken?  EASY things they should have learned as young teens.  OK!  Health and safety will not allow you to put knives in teenagers hands BUT what you can do is let them see the process and FEEL the joints before you make the cuts.


4-H

There's a lot of information out there.....
https://pubs.wsu.edu/ListCategories.aspx?TopicID=7

4-H Poultry Club Teaches Kids How To Bring Birds Full Circle
http://indianapublicmedia.org/news/4h-poultry-club-kids-bring-birds-full-circle-19278/

http://texas4-h.tamu.edu/publications/
 

kc5tpy

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Hello Aj.  EXACTLY!!!  I assume because you are a member these minor things would be wasted on you.  You know lots of this stuff or now know where to find it.  What do the young kids do?  How do we teach the kids not to microwave that dog?  How do we get them interested?  There is my point.  THE KIDS.  How do we bring them into the fold?  Get them interested?  Get them excited?

Hello Martin.  I did/my kids did 4H and FFA.  I recently handed my jackets and pins to the daughter because she wanted them as keepsake.  ( Guess she figures I am not long for this world.  I'll out live her.  I am too tight with money to leave an inheritance. )  Inner city kids and all kids here in the U.|K. don't have those options.  No such organisations here.  Not talking about farm kids; talking about kids who have never seen a live cow.

WELL.  Judging from the responses no one seems to have a working model we could copy and use to spread the word.  Is a shame but seems all any of us can do is pass on to the family.  I learned BBQ from Dads, Granddads, and Uncles back in the old days when no one had a meat therm.  Many kids will NEVER have the chance to learn to grill a good burger on the BBQ.

Well I have the Grandson started and my Daughters do quite well.  Maybe my sights were set too high.  Thank you all for your input.

Danny
 

diggingdogfarm

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Not talking about farm kids; talking about kids who have never seen a live cow.
I think that 4-H is a pretty good model.
4-H kids are not all farm kids.

57% of 4-H members are from large inner cities, larger cities and their suburbs.
43% of 4-H members are from rural areas and towns with populations of 10,000 or less.

Source: 4-H.org
 

bluewhisper

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Well this isn't exactly what you have in mind, but I started a wildflower cultivation project for 5th-grade science students about a year ago. I provided seeds for several native (to Ohio) species of flowers, and they undertook cultivation and planting on the school campus. They report some success and they've begun to learn about the flowers and the life they support, like bees, caterpillars, etc.
 

franklin3

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Your right I didn't mean to sidetrack or hijack the thread.

I just think that its up to parents and grandparents to pass these things along to their kids within the family, as far as kids looking at this as nothing more than chores, thats a matter of perspective, every coin has two sides, if you argue with an idiot hes probably doing the same thing and if you choose not to look at the positive side of things well thats just on you.  I learned these things from my father and grandfather, they always emphasized the "team" concept, I do not participate in these activities solely for my own benefit, (but I do enjoy tremendously the community this forum has created), I also beleive as everyone else here appears to me to beleive that it is important to pass these along to the next generation.  When My grandaughters or grandsons and I are engaged in fishing, hunting, cooking, BBQing, canning, or cleaning the yard, or the shed, or whatever it is, I show them that while this is a chore for one person to have to do, many hands make heavy work light. and there is a fun side to everything, but you are entitled to your own point of view and you can look at it however you want.
 

fpmich

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Wow, what a great thread and read!

After reading all the posts, I, at various points, thought I'd post this, or then that, and then again something else again.

A lot of great points, in spite of disagreements.  Disagreements make the world better, if a person is willing to listen to both sides, and perhaps be swayed one way or the other.  But that is another skill lost in the mix today it seems (see government).  I love being swayed to the other side of my thinking, with facts and explanations.  It means I've learned something.

Heated Arguments are usually opinionated, and non-productive, resulting in bull headed, back boned, going to stick to my guns, no matter what, attitudes.  But a heated civil discussion, can and will produce, enlightened people on both sides of issue.

The volunteering to teach older skills to younger people is a great idea, and I am all for it.  Never thought of volunteering to do something like this at a school. 

Maybe now I will, if I come up with something worthwhile, that I know first hand works.  Or I will just continue trying to influence those around me, and let them influence their kids.

I was born too late to learn from Grandparents.  Learn what little I do know from Mom and Dad.

Dad was lacking a bit in his skills, as well as teaching.  LOL  Learned gardening, canning, cooking, processing meat, from my Mom.  But I only learned a tenth of what I should have, if I'd payed attention more when young.

But even with volunteering our time to demonstrate a skill at schools and such, we will never reach all the kids.  But it is worth the effort if you can get the school to allow it.

It must be taught at home, and, sad to say, it isn't often taught at home.  Be it killing chickens, scalding & plucking, then singeing, then cutting it up and cooking for tonight dinner, or just something simple like a budget and planning, or planting flowers.  It HAS to start at home! 

Kids will be interested in a show and tell, but they will mostly only remember when so-in-so showed us something to do with...(insert anything here). 

Now there is nothing wrong with show and tell.  It just may activate a gene down the line later, to get them to learn on their own.  That is the goal.

Case for instance:  Two of my wife's kids, raised on a farm grew into adulthood, and started their own family's.  One set of grand kids are very loving, and self reliant and hard working.  I think even the 10 year old could survive with a 22, and a knife for a night or two lost in the woods.

The other set of grandkids would starve if McDonald's closed on Christmas Day.

It's all in the upbringing.

But it is very tuff  to do this instructing, at a school in the USA now.  A few weeks ago my grand kids was telling me all of the words they were forbidden to speak or write in school.

I was astounded!  It is pure crap!  If a 10 year old says kill, gun, terrorist in a sentence, he gets expelled.  And they had about 50 more words that I can't remember.  It's nuts!

They have to study harder to remember the banned words, than they do their regular studies.  Really!  What if you slip up and use a banned word?  Kiss college good by!

And this is in a very small community school.  I can't imagine the bigger cities rules.

So for a kid to come into class and explain that this summer at grandpa's, I learned how to chop off a chickens head to kill it, scald it, pluck it,  and cut it for dinner.  And be proud of their accomplishment,  is impossible! 

They also couldn't explain how to cut up a chicken from a market.  It would use the word "knife".

I suspect the punishment for an adult would be more severe than expulsion from school.  LOL 

I'm 69, and it is a different world now.  Saddens me very much, but don't know how we can change it back to a more common sense country.

The younger than 50 folks seem content to let anything happen, and believe lies without any research, and vote for who looks good, and etc.

I fear for our country, and my grand and great grandkids.  My Mom also feared for the same.  She died 5 years ago at over 100 years.  So she would know.
 
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sopchoppy

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I'm a 1949 model with high mileage. I was fortunate to be born in South Alabama to parents who had little. Mama and Daddy were raised in tough times. The only things they bought were salt and sugar, raised or grew the rest. Corn went to the mill to be ground into flour, meal, and grits. Fresh eggs and milk were just out the back door. I remember hog killin' day, first cool Saturday in the fall. Daddy showed me they really did throw away just the hair and squeal. Black cast iron pot rendering lard, women cleaning casings, it was a while before I could eat sausage again. Grandma and her sister in the kitchen grinding and stuffing sausage. The smokehouse was really a house. The old house was put on logs and pulled back with mules when they built a new house. It was only 2 rooms. Poles were laid across the beams to hang sausage and hams, a hole had been cut in the center of the floor for the smoking fire. Grandma would fry up some of the ground sausage to sample to check the seasoning. The whole process started at daylight and finished sometime in the afternoon.
I guess that's when my love of smoking meat got started. I just didn't know it at the time.
 
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