Shelf Stable Canning with FoodSaver Jar Sealer?

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snakehead

Fire Starter
Original poster
Sep 29, 2013
50
49
Round Rock, TX
I’ve decided to get into pickling, and I have a recipe I want to do for okra, cauliflower, green beans, pickles, and more. I’ve canned before the old fashion way with mason jars, and a water bath, but I bought the vacuum seal attachment for my food saver, I would like to try using it instead. I want to be shelf stable, not take a room in my refrigerator, and wanted to get the groups thoughts on doing it this way.

It seems to me that as long as I hate to bring to over 160° and fill the sterile jars with it hot and flip them upside down to make sure that the lids get sterilized by the hot brine too, and the pH is 4.6 or lower that I should be OK, but wanted to see if I’m missing something?
 

snakehead

Fire Starter
Original poster
Thread starter
Sep 29, 2013
50
49
Round Rock, TX
The vacuum sealer will NOT replace canning.
Your second paragraph is confusing... and your lids should already be sterilized withouot
having to flip them over.
The vacuum sealer attachment is meant for dry type things like dried beans or chips.
https://www.foodsaver.ca/en_CA/blog/archive/2014/november/using-your-jar-sealer.html
Per that link: But dry foods are not the only ones that can be stored with these items. Jams, jellies and spreads should be sealed in jars, then placed in the pantry for long-term storage. This is ideal for those large batches of homemade jam you're planning to hand out over the holidays, as they can be sealed, stored and retrieved at any moment's notice. Don't forget to decorate your jars if you're going to repurpose them as presents!

In the food processing business (jarred salsa's, bbq sauce, etc) are heated to 160° then filled into jars. The heating causes the food to sterilize the jars and causes a vacuum as well thereby removing the oxygen from it. In order to prevent botulism, the pH has to be below 4.6, hence why citric acid or vinegar is added to lower it since the pH is higher in Tomatoes, etc.
 

Hockeydudde

Meat Mopper
Jan 31, 2022
270
286
New Mexico
We live in the US, so we have to water bath can to be safe. But in other countries, hot packing jars without further water bath canning I understand is common.

They must have different microbes there. Weak ones. Not like our strong American ones 🤣.

I do recall someone recently posting about using a chamber sealer to seal a hot liquid. At vacuum it flash boiled and created a huge mess. If you are planning to vacuum the jars while still hot, maybe something to keep in mind. If you could get a controlled boil at lower temperature, it would do a great job driving out oxygen. But maybe it would just make a mess and need up your seal.
 
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