Preserving Gilled Chicken

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GatorAGR

Meat Mopper
Original poster
SMF Premier Member
Jan 30, 2024
154
137
Carmel, IN
Planning to grill several chicken breasts to eat throughout the week and want to try to preserve the moisture. Thinking about gilling followed by vac seal? Any thoughts?
 
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If I'm planning to eat them pretty quick I just use ziplock bags and the straw n the corner method to suck the excess air out. Draws down pretty tight. If I'm keeping longer than 4 days(like shredded) I always vac seal.

Keith
 
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Heating in the vac seal is very fast and convenient. I use the microwave, some prefer water bath which is slower. I'm not worried about the "plastic/microwave" thing, I keep an eye on it. If you let it come to room temp or close (safer with cooked chicken than raw) it can take as little as 30 seconds for one boneless breast, maybe a minute, unless you come straight from the fridge then maybe a couple-three minutes. I heat until my hand doesn't want to hold it and let rest for a bit. If cold, best to heat for a minute and let it rest, then check it and bump it again until its hot.

I do this with rotisserie chicken. Sam's club has huge ones for $5 last time we got them. I break them down and foodsaver the boneless breasts and the hind quarters. I pick the carcass clean as I can and make chicken salad with the bits, or in the colder months make my own broth with the carcasses then soup with the picked bits.

The moisture level begins with the cook. I've learned to brine boneless breasts for grilling and watch them like a hawk when grilling and yank them at 165. If I check and they are 125 and dare walk away to do something else, they are over 165 before I realize it.
 
Brining is a good way to go for added moisture and moisture preservation. I always vac seal them either individually or two in a bag. Even if I don’t freeze them and they are going to be eaten within a couple of days. I have even sealed several in one bag, leaving enough room at the top of the bag that I can cut it open, grab one and reseal the bag.
 
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Rapid cool in ice water, freeze and then vac seal.
Before thawing, nip a hole in the bag to prevent the vacum from sucking moisture out.
Same reason to freeze first.
Micro on low..
 
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Rapid cool in ice water, freeze and then vac seal.
Before thawing, nip a hole in the bag to prevent the vacum from sucking moisture out.
Same reason to freeze first.
Micro on low..
This is interesting. I have pre-frozen stuff before bagging, but usually casserole servings, etc.. but never thought of that for chicken, etc..

I just thawed and heated a package of boudin and noted how much liquid it rendered that went down the drain and the boudin could have used that moisture. It was still good, but would have been better with the broth that leeched out still in it.

Not only am I going to try venting with a small cut next time when microwaving, but also going to try pre-freezing and see if that improves the reheat quality.

I'm still waiting to see a picture of that chicken with gills!
 
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