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Pastrami recipe recommendations

Kyleblun

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I am planning to make my first pastrami soon. Please let me know your preferred recipes.
 

Chasdev

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I got mine from the Diners Drive in and Dives show.
Dave said on the the episode that it was the best he ever tasted.
Food network has the info..I tried it and it is fantastic and I've made it three times now.

 

zwiller

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Cured before? First few pastramis I used corned beef from the store and then rubbed with black pepper, garlic, and coriander. Very tasty. If looking to get into curing I'd suggest checking out Pop's brine.
 

SmokinAl

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Try this one.
Al
 

smokeymose

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I've been happy with Chef jimmyj's "Better'n NY Pastrami Rub". I think this is his latest rendition
for an already cured corned beef;
2 TB Turbinado Sugar
2 TB Black Peppercorns
1 TB Coriander Seeds
1 TB Dill Seed
1TB Dry Minced Onion
1 TB Dry Minced Garlic
1 Tsp Allspice Berries
1 Tsp Mustard Seed
1 Tsp Dry Thyme Leaves
3 Bay Leaves, crumbled
1 Tsp Juniper Berries
Lightly toast whole spices before grinding coarse.

I don't even smoke it anymore, just vac-seal it and Sous Vide at 152 for about 19 hours.
 

Dive Bar Casanova

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Pink Curing salt is Prague powder, not pink salt.
Be real careful with it.

What's the best pickle to use on the sandwich?
I tried Bread n Butter pickles and they are too sweet as are Dill.
Seems a sour pickle would work better. Hard to find out here, we'll have to Amazon them.
 
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zwiller

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I don't even smoke it anymore, just vac-seal it and Sous Vide at 152 for about 19 hours.
I have been think about that or giving it just a few hours of smoke. VERY interesting temps and time! Thanks for that.
 

GonnaSmoke

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I've been happy with Chef jimmyj's "Better'n NY Pastrami Rub". I think this is his latest rendition
for an already cured corned beef;
2 TB Turbinado Sugar
2 TB Black Peppercorns
1 TB Coriander Seeds
1 TB Dill Seed
1TB Dry Minced Onion
1 TB Dry Minced Garlic
1 Tsp Allspice Berries
1 Tsp Mustard Seed
1 Tsp Dry Thyme Leaves
3 Bay Leaves, crumbled
1 Tsp Juniper Berries
Lightly toast whole spices before grinding coarse.

I don't even smoke it anymore, just vac-seal it and Sous Vide at 152 for about 19 hours.
I have used JJ's and this one by thirdeye thirdeye

I like them both...
 

thirdeye

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I am planning to make my first pastrami soon. Please let me know your preferred recipes.
Well you have plenty of options. A pastrami has 3 basic steps. The cure, the smoking, and the finish.

The cure can be dry or wet. The cure can be a basic cure (salt, sugar, Cure #1) or it can be a 'corning' cure, which still has Cure #1 but contains a spice profile like a corned beef with pickling spices, mustard seeds etc.

Smoking is straight forward but pastrami uses a rub that leans toward pappery, coriander and garlic.

The finish is very important, it's what tenderizes (and to some degree) moisturizes your pastrami. A natural finish is just that.... smoked much like a brisket. A steam finish is like a lot of deli's use, you can accomplish this is you have a tamale steamer or a pasta pot with the insert. A braise finish uses liquid and low oven or stovetop temps. Last is a pressure finish which takes less time and produces really good flavored broth.

Just to get the feel for the end product and the process, you might want to pick-up a corned beef brisket at the market or club store. These are heavily brined (and injected) so it needs a soak-out in cold water. After that you season, smoke and finish.
 

smokeymose

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I have been think about that or giving it just a few hours of smoke. VERY interesting temps and time! Thanks for that.
I thought about the good Pastrami I've had at delis and realized I didn't really notice a "smoky" flavor.
I am thinking of trying something different. I recently picked up a packer and was planning on using the flat for corned beef/pastrami.
I use Pop's brine with a little pickling spice to make the corned beef and I"m thinking of cold smoking the corned beef a bit
before doing the rub sous vide thing. We'll see :-)
 

jcam222

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I thought about the good Pastrami I've had at delis and realized I didn't really notice a "smoky" flavor.
I am thinking of trying something different. I recently picked up a packer and was planning on using the flat for corned beef/pastrami.
I use Pop's brine with a little pickling spice to make the corned beef and I"m thinking of cold smoking the corned beef a bit
before doing the rub sous vide thing. We'll see :-)
Without smoking it is basically corned beef correct? I think what differentiates the two is the smoking?
 

smokeymose

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Without smoking it is basically corned beef correct? I think what differentiates the two is the smoking?
No, there's a big difference once you add the Pastrami seasoning, and the Sous Vide lets the flavors soak into the meat without drying out.
I've had mixed results smoking flats in my offset and don't want to ruin something I've spent so much time and $ on
and frankly haven't noticed a difference.
I guess I'm not a purist. I don't smoke my hot dogs either, though I put a little liquid smoke in the mix....
 

zwiller

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I think the spice rub is really what makes pastrami. I don't notice a prominent smoke flavor in pastrami but admit I don't eat a ton of it. To me, the finish is the real key. Smoking ain't gonna fix shoe leather... I will give you guys a heads up about smoking and SV. I ran some CB one time and finished in the SV after smoking and it was nasty. There is something going on and cannot pin it down. I think you need a few days for the smoke to gas off a bit or ease off on the amount of smoke. daveomak daveomak warned me based on his experiences and he was right.
 

smokeymose

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I think the spice rub is really what makes pastrami. I don't notice a prominent smoke flavor in pastrami but admit I don't eat a ton of it. To me, the finish is the real key. Smoking ain't gonna fix shoe leather... I will give you guys a heads up about smoking and SV. I ran some CB one time and finished in the SV after smoking and it was nasty. There is something going on and cannot pin it down. I think you need a few days for the smoke to gas off a bit or ease off on the amount of smoke. daveomak daveomak warned me based on his experiences and he was right.
Thanks for the heads up!
I don't think I'll be trying that after all.
If it ain't broke don't fix it....
 

jcam222

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No, there's a big difference once you add the Pastrami seasoning, and the Sous Vide lets the flavors soak into the meat without drying out.
I've had mixed results smoking flats in my offset and don't want to ruin something I've spent so much time and $ on
and frankly haven't noticed a difference.
I guess I'm not a purist. I don't smoke my hot dogs either, though I put a little liquid smoke in the mix....
I think the spice rub is really what makes pastrami. I don't notice a prominent smoke flavor in pastrami but admit I don't eat a ton of it. To me, the finish is the real key. Smoking ain't gonna fix shoe leather... I will give you guys a heads up about smoking and SV. I ran some CB one time and finished in the SV after smoking and it was nasty. There is something going on and cannot pin it down. I think you need a few days for the smoke to gas off a bit or ease off on the amount of smoke. daveomak daveomak warned me based on his experiences and he was right.
I’m always up for an alternate way to do things. May have to try this. I’ve never done a flat on it’s own. The whole ones I’ve been buying already cured from GFS come out so juicy it’s amazing. I can defiltley see where different rubs change the flavor profiles dramatically.
 

chopsaw

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Last one I did was a small 3 lb flat . Dry cured using the numbers from digging dog Calc and the spice rub from Ruhlmanns book . Cooked using Al's method of smoke then SV . Fantastic .
 

tallbm

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I am planning to make my first pastrami soon. Please let me know your preferred recipes.
Hi there and welcome!

Here is my traditional pastrami from a brisket flat:


Flavor was spot on. Wish I did the whole brisket this way but oh well :D
 

Dive Bar Casanova

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Well you have plenty of options. A pastrami has 3 basic steps. The cure, the smoking, and the finish.

The cure can be dry or wet. The cure can be a basic cure (salt, sugar, Cure #1) or it can be a 'corning' cure, which still has Cure #1 but contains a spice profile like a corned beef with pickling spices, mustard seeds etc.

Smoking is straight forward but pastrami uses a rub that leans toward pappery, coriander and garlic.

The finish is very important, it's what tenderizes (and to some degree) moisturizes your pastrami. A natural finish is just that.... smoked much like a brisket. A steam finish is like a lot of deli's use, you can accomplish this is you have a tamale steamer or a pasta pot with the insert. A braise finish uses liquid and low oven or stovetop temps. Last is a pressure finish which takes less time and produces really good flavored broth.

Just to get the feel for the end product and the process, you might want to pick-up a corned beef brisket at the market or club store. These are heavily brined (and injected) so it needs a soak-out in cold water. After that you season, smoke and finish.
Thumbs up.
I steam my smoked meats in a cheap-o casserole style crock pot on high.
2 hours with 2 oz of water works super. Apple cider is good too.
Click it to warm and it doubles as a serving vessel.
SCCPCCM350-CH-1?wid=180&hei=180.jpg
Katz Deli in NYC and Langers in LA says steaming your pastrami after smoking is essential.
 
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