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How to Set Up a Butcher Shop Meat Processing

ShinerPrairie

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We raise Large Black hogs and American-Kobe beef, and want to start a charcuterie business here on our farm in Shiner, Texas. I cannot find any information on equipment needed, room sizes (for cold storage, fermentation and curing rooms, brining room, etc...) We are looking at processing up to about 2-8 hogs per week, plus an occasional, one/two per month, of our steers. I am an architect, and can design the space, but I am not a butcher and have no idea what kind of space(s), size of spaces, equipment needs/requirements, etc... I'm designing for. We will be curing charcuterie, some cuts up to three years, so I need a large curing room, but what does that look like, dimension wise, etc... I'm so confused!!! Help?
 

TNJAKE

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Maybe S SCBBQ can help you out. He has a beautiful setup that's probably similar to what your needs are.
 

TNJAKE

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Click on his name in my post then click start new conversation. Or wait for him to show up here since I tagged him
 

jcam222

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I’d recommend finding someone in your area who does this as a business to lean on for advice. Find someone far enough out they don’t perceive you as competition.
 

rc4u

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this stuff is great and done right. check out faq's.. texas deserves the best

WHAT IS DRY AGING ?
Dry-aging means that the beef has been hung to dry for several weeks. Only beef of a higher quality can be dry aged. Dry-aged beef is only available in upscale butcher shops and high-end steak houses. The most important reason to dry age beef is for the tenderization of the meat texture.
 

indaswamp

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I was going to mention that the USDA has a booklet out that shows all the requirements and offers a layout as rjob rjob has posted.
 

indaswamp

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Also, talk with your county Health dept. They will have a USDA representative in the area that you can talk with and get information and questions answered.
 

tallbm

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We raise Large Black hogs and American-Kobe beef, and want to start a charcuterie business here on our farm in Shiner, Texas. I cannot find any information on equipment needed, room sizes (for cold storage, fermentation and curing rooms, brining room, etc...) We are looking at processing up to about 2-8 hogs per week, plus an occasional, one/two per month, of our steers. I am an architect, and can design the space, but I am not a butcher and have no idea what kind of space(s), size of spaces, equipment needs/requirements, etc... I'm designing for. We will be curing charcuterie, some cuts up to three years, so I need a large curing room, but what does that look like, dimension wise, etc... I'm so confused!!! Help?
Hi there and welcome!

I think the guys have good info for ya.
I don't have any exact answers but I would recommend you check out some wild game processing shops around you to get some ideas there as well.

One in Gainsville, TX has a freaking rail system that travels from the door through 2 giant walk in coolers and out to the area with tables so the animal NEVER touches the floor. Many hooks and animals can be on this rail system in the coolers.

Also drains in all the floors and floors that can be easily washed, mopped, etc.

I think USDA requirements will clear a lot up concerning stainless steel tables and such.

Pre-COVID times I would process 9-15 wild game animals each year in my garage after my week long trip of nonstop hunting. Mostly deer and feral hogs.
My whole operation is done in 6ft x 30inch blow molded tables (not the fold in half time just the leg folding type). I cover them with good washable table clothes and I use giant 18" x 24" x 1/2" HDPE cutting boards that fit into my dish washer. Also HDPE meat totes and my garage fridge and freezers for holding deboned meat and then vac sealed end product.

Animals are dressed, skinned, quartered and put into giant igloo coolers with ice and remain in ice until I debone it all where it goes into fridge or vac seal into freezer (roasts, steaks, etc.)
Anything in the fridge is in meat totes and is usually for grinding for pure grind or for sausage making.

I know you didn't ask but me and a 2nd person can debone 15 animals in 2.5 days and have all of it processed into grind, uncooked sausage, roasts, etc. and vac sealed and in the freezer in 2 more days (4-5 days total). All in my garage being able to safely keep meat cold, work meat, and clean up at the end of every day. Then put it all away.

I ramble on like this so it gives you an idea of what having a little space and fold away/store away equipment and a home dishwasher allows me to do. My processing is top notch too btw. I learned along time ago that if you have tissue of the animal you wouldn't throw it into a skillet and eat it then it doesn't go into grinds, sausage, or steaks. Makes a world of difference when deboning, cleaning, and processing the meat into things you eat :)

I hope this long reply helps :)
 

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