Got a favorite kefta recipe?

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jbo_c

Meat Mopper
Original poster
Nov 23, 2020
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Had some kefta while I was in Israel a few months ago and have since tried a couple of my own. I’m sure what I had was beef and lamb, but I’ve made mostly beef. - though I’m sure I’ll also make some venison or beef/venison ones too.

Most recipes seem to call for mint, but I’m fairly certain what I had there did not contain mint.

Anybody here make it and have a recipe you like?

Thanks.

Jbo
 
Incidentally, I had no idea what I was getting. It was a choice menu and I just knew I didn’t want the fish. The kefta was a very nice “accident”. It will be a semi-regular item at our house now.

It looks like just hamburger, but it’s much more of a “skinless sausage on a stick” as Hank Shaw calls it.

Jbo
 
Love kefta or kofta.
I usually make them into meatballs as I have not gotten them to stay together as a kebab.
You may not distinctly taste the mint, but it is a traditional seasoning.

Don't have a recipe to share.
Give one of Jeff's a try /\ /\ /\
 
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Thanks for the replies. I think the trick to getting them to stay on the sticks is to mix them long enough to get some protein extraction like you would for sausage(but maybe not quite as much). That has worked for me.

Jbo
 
Thanks for the replies. I think the trick to getting them to stay on the sticks is to mix them long enough to get some protein extraction like you would for sausage(but maybe not quite as much). That has worked for me.

Jbo
100% agree
 
Armenians call it kufta but its all the same.When my mom was alive she made homemade kufta and somewhere in my dad's house is the recipe question is where?I looked several times over the years without luck.

Being that I live in RI and there's a fairly large Armenian community in the Providence/Cranston area there's a couple of markets that make them in house.Matter of fact I just came from a place called Sonia's and picked up 2 doz kufta and 2 doz lahmajune!
 
This is a recipe that we currenty have been using for quite a few years when we're not feeling lazy.It'll make 2 doz.If I remember correctly this recipe came from one of Barbara Ghazarian's cook books.

The stuffing:
1/2 lb ground lamb 80% lean
1 large onion finely chopped
1/4tsp allspice
1/4tsp ground clove
1/2tsp salt
1/4tsp pepper
1/3 cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley

The crust:
3 cups fine grain bulger
1 lb ground lamb 95% lean (kheyma meat)
1/2tsp salt
1/4tsp pepper

The broth:
8 cups chicken broth

1. To make the stuffing saute the lamb,onion,allspice,clove salt and pepper on a low heat until evenly browned and the onion is soft.Remove from heat,add the parsley and let cool to room temp.

2.For the crust put the bulger in a mixing bowl and start adding cold water stirring occasionally until its covered.Let it stand until most of the water is absorbed,about 10mins.

3.In a large mixing bowl combine the kheyma with bulger.Knead in the salt and pepper until its the consistency of bread dough.If the mixture is to dry and crumbly you can add small amounts of water until its right.Now roll small portions into walnut sized balls then make a hole in the center of each ball with your fingers.Then add a tsp of stuffing then close the hole by pushing the outer crust around the hole,dipping your fingers in cold water will help in closing the hole.

4.Pour the broth into a large pot and bring to a boil over high heat then start adding the kuftas a few at a time.They will sink to the bottom,when they rise to the surface and float they are done (about 8 mins or so).

5.Serve in a bowl with a little of the broth.
Some people like them with yogurt soup which is nothing more than 4cups plain yogurt,an egg and the juice of one lemon.Combine the three and about 5 ladles of the broth and you're good to go.
 
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Bookmarked that normanaj normanaj THANKS. Funny you mention lazy. I am dead set on getting a EZ kafta recipe down for weekday summer. I tried GB mixed with tabbouleh from the store and a ninja'd onion. Pretty good and close to what I was aiming for. I admit have no idea. Part of me thinks I need to try a 50/50 GB/lamb mix.

jcam222 jcam222 Did you try parsley and move to cilantro?

Good call on the protein extraction for kebabs but I like to make them like larger meatballs, grill, quarter, and put into a pita with fixins. Kinda sorta like falafel. Was just introduced to fatoosh. HOLY. Thinking pita, schmear of hummus, fatoosh, and quartered kafta.
 
Bookmarked that normanaj normanaj THANKS. Funny you mention lazy. I am dead set on getting a EZ kafta recipe down for weekday summer. I tried GB mixed with tabbouleh from the store and a ninja'd onion. Pretty good and close to what I was aiming for. I admit have no idea. Part of me thinks I need to try a 50/50 GB/lamb mix.

jcam222 jcam222 Did you try parsley and move to cilantro?

Good call on the protein extraction for kebabs but I like to make them like larger meatballs, grill, quarter, and put into a pita with fixins. Kinda sorta like falafel. Was just introduced to fatoosh. HOLY. Thinking pita, schmear of hummus, fatoosh, and quartered kafta.
I’ve used both, prefer cilantro. I love meatball style and man you can create very unique burger sandwiches with it.
 
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I’ve used both, prefer cilantro. I love meatball style and man you can create very unique burger sandwiches with it.
THANKS. We LOVE cilantro. We're all about pitas. Could do them 3 days a week in summer. Heck often we just sear a pita to schmear hummus on it. Not sure if you make it to West Side Market but if you do check out Nate's deli. KILLER middle eastern stuff. DUDE, seriously wicked threads you did up there!
 
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This is a recipe that we currenty have been using for quite a few years when we're not feeling lazy.It'll make 2 doz.If I remember correctly this recipe came from one of Barbara Ghazarian's cook books.

The stuffing:
1/2 lb ground lamb 80% lean
1 large onion finely chopped
1/4tsp allspice
1/4tsp ground clove
1/2tsp salt
1/4tsp pepper
1/3 cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley

The crust:
3 cups fine grain bulger
1 lb ground lamb 95% lean (kheyma meat)
1/2tsp salt
1/4tsp pepper

The broth:
8 cups chicken broth

1. To make the stuffing saute the lamb,onion,allspice,clove salt and pepper on a low heat until evenly browned and the onion is soft.Remove from heat,add the parsley and let cool to room temp.

2.For the crust put the bulger in a mixing bowl and start adding cold water stirring occasionally until its covered.Let it stand until most of the water is absorbed,about 10mins.

3.In a large mixing bowl combine the kheyma with bulger.Knead in the salt and pepper until its the consistency of bread dough.If the mixture is to dry and crumbly you can add small amounts of water until its right.Now roll small portions into walnut sized balls then make a hole in the center of each ball with your fingers.Then add a tsp of stuffing then close the hole by pushing the outer crust around the hole,dipping your fingers in cold water will help in closing the hole.

4.Pour the broth into a large pot and bring to a boil over high heat then start adding the kuftas a few at a time.They will sink to the bottom,when they rise to the surface and float they are done (about 8 mins or so).

5.Serve in a bowl with a little of the broth.
Some people like them with yogurt soup which is nothing more than 4cups plain yogurt,an egg and the juice of one lemon.Combine the three and about 5 ladles of the broth and you're good to go.
Got any pictures? This recipe doesn’t square with my experience or the recipes I’ve seen. (I’m ABSOLUTELY no expert. I didn’t even know what I was eating until after the trip when I saw a recipe on-line.).

What I’m referring to is a sausage on a skewer. Filling, crust, and broth don’t calculate for me.

Different version of the same thing?

Jbo
 
In Armenian culture the kufta is in meatball form which is the case in many middleeastern cultures.

I'll post some pics of some that I have currently in the freezer. I'll be having them tomorrow and post both whole and open pics.
 
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Here’s what I made. It was awesome and well received(though didn’t taste much like what I had in Israel).

Home made naan, Greek salad and tzatziki(bought the hummus). Rave reviews all around.
 

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These are traditional Armenian kufta.
 

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Had some kefta while I was in Israel a few months ago and have since tried a couple of my own. I’m sure what I had was beef and lamb, but I’ve made mostly beef. - though I’m sure I’ll also make some venison or beef/venison ones too.

Most recipes seem to call for mint, but I’m fairly certain what I had there did not contain mint.

Anybody here make it and have a recipe you like?

Thanks.

Jbo
Hmm. Been a very long time since I was in Israel, but I do recall eating those. Had some interesting times in Haifa. Don't have any recipes coming to mind, but I've done a bunch of different kabobs like that. They vary from region to region.. like the doner kabob etc etc. Time to make something like this again.
 
That recipe sounds a lot like the one I’ve used. - only it doesn’t include cilantro, but uses double the parsley and also includes onions and garlic.

I prefer the texture somewhere between burger and sausage.

With fresh flat bread, Greek salad and tzatziki, it’s delicious and a hit with company who have never had it before.

Thanks for the recipe. Love cilantro. I’ll have to try it that way.

Jbo
 
That recipe sounds a lot like the one I’ve used. - only it doesn’t include cilantro, but uses double the parsley and also includes onions and garlic.

I prefer the texture somewhere between burger and sausage.

With fresh flat bread, Greek salad and tzatziki, it’s delicious and a hit with company who have never had it before.

Thanks for the recipe. Love cilantro. I’ll have to try it that way.

Jbo. Seeking a notary public close to me, I find solace in convenience. Within reach, a notary public awaits, ready to certify documents. Nearby, a notary public stands poised to validate signatures. In my neighborhood, a notary public offers swift authentication. A notary public close to me ensures legality with ease.
How do you make Koftas?
Where do you get your favorite version of this dish?
What spices do you use in the Kofta meat?
 
How do you make Koftas?
Where do you get your favorite version of this dish?
What spices do you use in the Kofta meat?
The recipe and process I use is in post #8 in this thread.It indeed came from Barbara Ghazarian's cookbook Simply Armenian which I thought I had lost and just recently found buried in my basement after a big cleanout.

When I don't make them myself we have a local Armenian market Sonia's that makes them in house but unfortunately they no longer ship.Kalustyan's in Manhattan might ship.
 
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