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cinco de mayo

vwmann

Newbie
8
10
Joined Mar 2, 2007
I am going to some friends houses for May 5th and was wondering if anybody has ideas to a Mexican style smoke recipe. I have no meat preference I just want a Mexican flare. Thanks for any replies.
 

billyq

Smoking Fanatic
305
10
Joined Apr 13, 2007
What about goat? I know, it's not everyones cup of tea. In southern Mexico they call it cabrito. It's usually cooked over a spit, but I don't know why you couldn't smoke it. You can try fajitas. They really aren't Mexican, but with enough Coronas in you, who cares?
 

teacup13

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
1,391
12
Joined Feb 22, 2007
Barbacoa

i have tried a recipe very similar to the second recipe.... the person who we had looking after it while we were at work misread the amount of hotness and burnt our mouths but was very tasty...we did it in grape leaves

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbacoa

Barbacoa Recipe

[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]SOUTH TEXAS STYLE BEEF BARBACOA[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 ½ teaspoons garlic powder[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 ½ teaspoons black pepper[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 tablespoon dried oregano[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 ½ teaspoons chile powder[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 teaspoon salt, or to taste[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]2 ½ - 3 ½ pound bone-in chuck roast[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Just before cooking, mix together the first five ingredients and rub them into all sides of the meat.[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Place some soaked wood chips near the heating element of a water smoker (according to the manufacturers instructions). Pour 3 quarts boiling water into the water pan, and smoke the beef for 4 hours at between 225 and 275 degrees. Check the smoker after 2 hours and add additional boiling water to the pan, if necessary. When done, the internal temperature of the beef should be 160 - 170 degrees. Place the beef in a foil baking pan, seal it with heavy duty aluminum foil, and place it in an oven preheated to 325 degrees. Bake for 1 hour and 45 minutes. Remove the package from the oven, and place it in a large, paper, grocery bag. Fold the bag tightly to seal it and leave it for 45 minutes. (If your foil pan is too large for one bag, use two, overlapping them to completely cover the pan). Remove the meat from the roasting pan. It will literally fall off the bone! Chop and shred the meat into small pieces. Serve with guacamole, salsa, and hot tortillas.[/font]




[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]COCHINITA PIBIL Yucatan Style Barbecued Pork[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Please note that achiote paste, available at Hispanic markets and some supermarkets may be substituted for the following recado. Also, the banana leaves may be omitted, if desired.[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The recado or rub:[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 tablespoon annato seeds (available at Hispanic markets)[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]½ teaspoon whole cumin[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 teaspoon oregano[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1/4 teaspoon powdered allspice[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]3/4 teaspoon powdered cinnamon[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 teaspoon salt[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 teaspoon ground coriander[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1 ½ teaspoons ancho chile powder[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]4 cloves garlic, minced and mashed to a paste[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]2 tablespoons orange juice[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]½ tablespoon lime juice[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Grind the annato seeds and cumin to a powder in a spice or coffee grinder, add the oregano, allspice, cinnamon, salt, coriander and chile powder and grind until the spices are thoroughly mixed. Place the powder in a small bowl, mix in the garlic, orange juice and lime juice. You want a smooth paste that spreads easily. If the recado seems dry add a little more juice.[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The pork:[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]2 ½ - 3 pound, one-half Boston butt roast[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The recado[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Banana leaves to wrap the pork (optional)[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Cotton string to tie the bundle (Do not use nylon cord as it may melt, creating unpleasant fumes and possibly causing burns).[/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Rub the recado into the pork and put it in the refrigerator overnight. If you are using banana leaves, roll them up, fold them in half, and steam them for 20 - 30 minutes to make them pliable. When the leaves have cooled, place them, shiny side up, on a work surface. Place the pork on the leaves, wrap into a tight bundle and tie with the string. [/font]
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Place some soaked wood chips near the heating element of a water smoker (according to the manufacturers instructions), pour 3 quarts boiling water into the water pan, and smoke the pork for 4 hours at between 225 and 275 degrees. Check the smoker after 2 hours and add additional boiling water to the pan, if necessary. When done, the internal temperature of the pork should be 160 - 170 degrees. Place the pork in a foil baking pan, seal it with heavy duty aluminum foil, and place it in an oven preheated to 325 degrees. Bake for 1 hour and 45 minutes. Remove the package from the oven, and place it in a large, paper, grocery bag. Fold the bag tightly to seal it and leave it for 45 minutes. (If your foil pan is too large for one bag, use two, overlapping them to completely cover the pan). Remove the pork from the roasting pan, and unwrap the banana leaves or foil. The meat will literally fall off the bone! Chop and shred the pork into small pieces. Serve with guacamole, salsa and hot tortillas.[/font]

http://www.lomexicano.com/barbacoa.htm
 

smoked

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
1,009
10
Joined Dec 14, 2006
yea, we have a mexican family that lives next to us, every year they get a live goat and butcher it......offered some to us last year, was a tad greasy, this year I think I'll offer to either make some sausage from the meat or smoke some for them.......
 

goat

Smoking Fanatic
OTBS Member
958
11
Joined Oct 27, 2005
I have eaten alot of goat, but being a lean meat to start with, none of it has ever been greasy. In this neck of the woods, there will be goat, barbacoa, menudo, tripas, tamales, pork carnitas, cervasa (beer), and some things that we all had rather not know about.

For most holidays here, goat is sold in the grocery store.
 

meowey

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
3,277
60
Joined Jul 16, 2006
Dutch posted this a while back - Smoked Beef Enchiladas. I've tried this recipe and found it to be fantastic. The whole family thinks it is a keeper.

Here is the link to his thread.

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/for...ead.php?t=3703

Hope this helps.

Take care, have fun, and do good!

Regards,

Meowey
 

vwmann

Newbie
8
10
Joined Mar 2, 2007
Thanks for the replies. The Smoked Beef Enchiladas sounds good. Never had goat meat before is it like Lamb?
 

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