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CanCookers

dirtsailor2003

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Mississippi is a good cook too! I cook lots of stews, chili, red beans, etc in the can. Shrimp, Crawford boils. Pazole is one of my favorite dishes to make.

here’s a cookI posted back in 2015

 

bill1

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Not sure these do anything a pressure cooker wouldn't do quicker???
But I admit a small hole in a large cooker can do great things with steam at atmospheric pressure. We have a small, cheap rice cooker we use a lot and the hole in the lid is just right...you just can't reproduce the rice results with a sauce pan and lid.
Unlike this CanCooker, the little rice cooker appears to have a constant-wattage element and the controls monitor the pot temp. When the rate of rise departs from that for the heat capacity of water to that of steam, it declares the rice perfectly cooked and the thing switches to a low-power warming mode. (One of the best-engineered kitchen devices I own...for $12!) And it came with a 2" spacer basket. Put in some carrots and onions at the same time as the rice and water and it all comes out just right.
Sorry if I digressed. But I think they both fall in the category of "enhanced steam cookers". Of which pressure cookers would be a high-pressure subset.
 

Colin1230

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Not sure these do anything a pressure cooker wouldn't do quicker???
But I admit a small hole in a large cooker can do great things with steam at atmospheric pressure. We have a small, cheap rice cooker we use a lot and the hole in the lid is just right...you just can't reproduce the rice results with a sauce pan and lid.
Unlike this CanCooker, the little rice cooker appears to have a constant-wattage element and the controls monitor the pot temp. When the rate of rise departs from that for the heat capacity of water to that of steam, it declares the rice perfectly cooked and the thing switches to a low-power warming mode. (One of the best-engineered kitchen devices I own...for $12!) And it came with a 2" spacer basket. Put in some carrots and onions at the same time as the rice and water and it all comes out just right.
Sorry if I digressed. But I think they both fall in the category of "enhanced steam cookers". Of which pressure cookers would be a high-pressure subset.
I have the same rice cooker / vegetable steamer you speak of but it won't cook a beef roast and you can't use it on a camp fire. Two different appliances that do roughly the same thing. Just my opinion.
 

dirtsailor2003

Epic Pitmaster
OTBS Member
21,894
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Joined Oct 4, 2012
Not sure these do anything a pressure cooker wouldn't do quicker???
But I admit a small hole in a large cooker can do great things with steam at atmospheric pressure. We have a small, cheap rice cooker we use a lot and the hole in the lid is just right...you just can't reproduce the rice results with a sauce pan and lid.
Unlike this CanCooker, the little rice cooker appears to have a constant-wattage element and the controls monitor the pot temp. When the rate of rise departs from that for the heat capacity of water to that of steam, it declares the rice perfectly cooked and the thing switches to a low-power warming mode. (One of the best-engineered kitchen devices I own...for $12!) And it came with a 2" spacer basket. Put in some carrots and onions at the same time as the rice and water and it all comes out just right.
Sorry if I digressed. But I think they both fall in the category of "enhanced steam cookers". Of which pressure cookers would be a high-pressure subset.
Not sure these do anything a pressure cooker wouldn't do quicker???
But I admit a small hole in a large cooker can do great things with steam at atmospheric pressure. We have a small, cheap rice cooker we use a lot and the hole in the lid is just right...you just can't reproduce the rice results with a sauce pan and lid.
Unlike this CanCooker, the little rice cooker appears to have a constant-wattage element and the controls monitor the pot temp. When the rate of rise departs from that for the heat capacity of water to that of steam, it declares the rice perfectly cooked and the thing switches to a low-power warming mode. (One of the best-engineered kitchen devices I own...for $12!) And it came with a 2" spacer basket. Put in some carrots and onions at the same time as the rice and water and it all comes out just right.
Sorry if I digressed. But I think they both fall in the category of "enhanced steam cookers". Of which pressure cookers would be a high-pressure subset.
Can cookers don’t require electricity to work.
They work as low pressure cookers.
Come from the ingenuity of dairy farmers using their cream cans for cooking meals.
 

bill1

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Joined Apr 25, 2015
Old fashioned pressure cookers didn't need electricity either. But it seems only the tabletop electric ones are deemed safe by most folks today.

And I didn't intend to imply a cheap rice cooker is a substitute for a pressure cooker or CanCooker. I just gave it as an example of the importance of sizing a pressure release hole as opposed to a loose-fitting lid on a pot. I think if you drilled out the hole in a CanCooker, you'd find the results undesirable.
 
Last edited:

dirtsailor2003

Epic Pitmaster
OTBS Member
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Joined Oct 4, 2012
Old fashioned pressure cookers didn't need electricity either. But it seems only the tabletop electric ones are deemed safe by most folks today.

And I didn't intend to imply a cheap rice cooker is a substitute for a pressure cooker or CanCooker. I just gave it as an example of the importance of sizing a pressure release hole as opposed to a loose-fitting lid on a pot. I think if you drilled out the hole in a CanCooker, you'd find the results undesirable.
Yes pressure cookers work great.
We can all kinds of stuff using ours.
The “Can cooker” posted her is a bit different.

the Ogallala cream can I have works as a low pressure, pressure cooker and produces great meals.
It does have a small hole in the lid.
I prefer to use it over the small pressure cooker as it holds more (2.5 gallon) and is smaller than the large ones we have.
Results are the same.
When I fished we’d cook with the small pressure cooker to get things done but we were only cooking for 3-4.
 

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