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Instructionals

  1. The Art Of The Curing Brine!

    I was born and brought up in a grocery/meat store, and my dad specialized in cured and smoked hams, bacons, shoulders, corned beef, pastrami, cured and smoked chickens and turkeys, etc. in Northern New York. He developed his own brine he brought from his dad's curing and smoking on the farm. Dad used a special cure he formulated with an ingredient company with less than a ⅓, just shy of a ¼ of the curing compound used by big manufacturers and fought, and won, a battle with State/Federal...
  2. Differences Between Spareribs, St. Louis Ribs, Babyback Ribs

    The best way to differentiate between these is to look at the animal and see where they come from: This is a whole pig with the backbone split down the center, but not separated.  Let's split it: Now, let's draw cut lines to separate out the parts'n'pieces: and label them: First, let's take the Pork Belly Spare Ribs: these also have the pork belly attached, so we have to separate them into: Pork Belly: and Pork Spareribs:(front and back views): Now, from the whole sparerib comes the St....
  3. How To Cure And Smoke A Turkey

    This is how I do a turkey (or any poultry). Equipment: Food Safe container or bucket. I use a 5 gallon bucket from Home Depot that has the image on it. That means that the plastic won't leach harmful chemicals into your curing brine. Curing Brine: I gallon of potable water (drinkable) ½ to 1 cup of salt ½ to 1 cup of sugar ½ to 1 cup of brown sugar *1 oz. (heaping tablespoon) of sodium nitrite curing salt Stir the brine approx. 50 stirs to dissolve the ingredients and the brine gets...
  4. Making Bacon

    I have a long history in making bacon, my dad ran a meat market and did all his own and we sold hundreds of thousands of pounds of bacon every year.   He used a commercially-prepared curing brine; however, I have reproduced it with common ingredients and one specialized ingredient. First, an explanation of "bacon": Traditional bacon starts as a hog's belly: Between the fore and hind legs is labeled "Spare Ribs" and "Side".  This is the belly section; the spareribs are removed from the...
  5. Basic Pulled Pork Smoke

    This was posted in 2007 by meowey, and was made sticky for good reasons...it is very accurate and informative.  The original thread is located here.  Enjoy -- mythmaster. Choice of meat: I use bone in Pork Shoulder – Boston Butt for my pulled pork. They range from 5 to 9 pounds. I find mine at Sam’s club cryo-packed with two butts per pack. Sometimes you can find them in supermarkets, or if you have a source at a meat wholesaler you can get them there. Some folks use a fresh pork picnic...
  6. Dry Cured Bacon Calculator And Procedure

    The calculator is a small Excel spreadsheet that will provide the amounts of salt and Cure 1 required to dry cure the lb weight of pork belly you enter.  There are different calculators for rind on or rind off bellies and 3% or 4% final salt concentration For 200 ppm initial Sodium Nitrite concentration Dry cured bacon calculator final.xls 23k .xls file BASIC DRY CURE PROCEDURE USING CURE 1 (Instacure 1, Prague Powder 1, Pink Salt)      any cure with 93.75% salt and 6.25% Sodium Nitrite...
  7. The Bend Test For Ribs

    Many new BBQers post questions on rib cooking methods, one of the most common is "How do I tell when ribs are done?" Perhaps the most used method is the bend test. Simply pick up the rack of ribs from one end with tongs, with the end of the tongs at about the 5th or 6th rib in(slightly less than 1/2 way). If the ribs bend at a 45° angle or more they are done.  Ribs done like this will not be "fall of the bone", if that is your preference keep on cooking past this point until they reach that...
  8. How to Trim Pork Ribs St Louis Style

    Trimming spareribs St. Louis style by Coyote This is how I cut spareribs St. Louis style. This cut involves removing the skirt meat on the back side (bone side) of the slab and also cutting off the brisket or what is also known as rib tips. Everything we cut off will still be cooked, nothing goes to waste! To do these cuts you'll need a cutting board, sharp boning or large knife, and several paper towels. First turn the slab of ribs meat side down so that you can see the skirt or flap of...
  9. The "UNCURED" Fallacy

    This article explains the 'uncured' curing, as does this statement from SausageMaker: [URL]http://dontwastethecrumbs.com/2012/09/nitrates-the-good-the-bad-the-truth/[/URL] You are here: Don't Waste The Crumbs » Real Food 101 » Nitrates: The Good, The Bad, The Truth NITRATES: THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE TRUTH SEPTEMBER 3, 2012 BY TIFFANY 62 COMMENTS As my family and I prepare to celebrate Labor Day with some delicious hot dogs and homemade buns, it’s hard to shake the thoughts about nitrates.  It’s a...
  10. Geeks Basic Brisket

    I haven't contributed much in a long time, so here's a recent post I wrote for my web site: Brisket is one of those cuts of meat that tends to scare smokers away from trying it.  For one thing, it's expensive.  For another, we've all had someone else's bad brisket.  It's like eating shoe leather.  Brisket is actually two muscled connected by a thick layer of fat.  The larger of the muscles is called the flat, which is the leaner of the two.  The other muscle is called the point and contains...
  11. Fine Points of Curing Brine

    One of the most common questions i get asked is "My curing brine is {ropy, smelly, thick, foamy, spoiled, etc. etc.}" What causes this?  Is it the formula?  The stirring?  The lack of stirring? Actually, it is one or more combinations of little things. First - thickening.  This is a normal consequence of curing meats, regardless of beef, pork, poultry, lamb, etc.  You are soaking meat in a chemical solution of water and ingredients.  Not only are you putting ingredients into the meat, you...
  12. Basic Pulled Pork according to SQWIB for Stickburners

    Hellow Fellow SMF'ers I posted this a while ago and have updated it significantly so I wanted to repost. Many of you have read most of this and may just want to skim it. Hopefully some will find this post useful. I removed the links as this was taken from my website which was just updated, so if any mods find a link, feel free to delete...thanks. I am sure there are a lot of things not in here and there is more than one way to skin a cat so with that said, below is a short tutorial of...
  13. From Bon Appétit - Breaking down and Cutting Up the Steer of Beef

    [URL]http://www.bonappetit.com/story/every-cut-of-steak-explained[/URL] A very nice documentary from Bon Appétit showing where your basic beef cuts come from and the process of breaking down beef.
  14. CURING INFORMATION BY NEPAS

    Great information by NEPAS: CURES - Cures are used in sausage products for color and flavor development as well as retarding the development of bacteria in the low temperature environment of smoked meats. Salt and sugar both cure meat by osmosis. In addition to drawing the water from the food, they dehydrate and kill the bacteria that make food spoil. In general, though, use of the word "cure" refers to processing the meat with either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate. The primary and most...
  15. Knives, Steels, and Sharpeners

    I use, for meatcutting, several basic, non-fancy knives.  Chicago Cutlery, Dexter, Victorinox, and so on.  I have two steels - a regular medium steel and a diamond steel.  The regular steel hones the edge of the knife, standing it up when it rolls over, but does not sharpen.  The diamond steel actually removes metal as well as setting up the edge.  But steeling a knife is not sharpening a knife.  I have had many many years of experience with a single sided and two-sided stones plus the...
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