Polish Sausages

Discussion in 'Sausage' started by seminole, Sep 29, 2007.

  1. seminole

    seminole Fire Starter

    I would like to start a thread on Polish Sausages as there is a great deal of confusion out there. Not only on the Internet, but in books and everywhere. I have bought a book ($250.00) that is written by a famous professor from the known university and he lists 22 Polish Sausages. He names them Polish Sausage A, Polish Sausage B, Polish Sausage C etc. What a joke.

    By varying the amount of spices and using diffferent meat combinations I can create so many recipes that I will need to use the Chinese alphabet (2,000 characters) to name them all. On a weekly basis I will try to provide one sausage recipe and instructions for making it. I will not be influenced by my own or my neighbor's preferences, instead I will rely on instructions and methods of Polish meat plants and sausage makers. They have been making those products for sale to the public and they had to be made good otherwise consumers would not buy them.

    American meat plants don't have the slightest idea what a Polish sausage should consist of. They use the name "kielbasa" or "Polish Sausage" as a marketing trick to gain the trust of the customer and anything that goes inside a one foot long and 36 mm diameter casing is called kielbasa or Polish sausage.

    Who We Are

    In November 2004, when Miroslaw Gebarowski started a Polish sausage forum dedicated to the traditional methods of meat preparation, little did he imagine of what would follow next. The idea took off like a rocket and to organize daily posts and growing material a web site was needed and three months later in February 2005, www.wedlinydomowe.pl (Wedliny Domowe signifies meat products made at home) was born. Today, we have three thousand members, many of them professionally educated and trained meat technologists and sausage makers. For a small country this is quite an achievement. Needless to say our site is enormous and is one of the most trafficked sites in Poland. By a popular demand in August 2006 the Wedliny Domowe First National Convention took place. This year the 3 Day Second National Convention will be even bigger with guests from other countries, international press and television.

    We probably have every sausage or meat product that was ever made in Poland on file (hundreds recipes) and we would like to share our hundreds of years of sausage making tradition with all sausage making lovers in other countries. This is why we are expanding our English site www.wedlinydomowe.com where we are going to post a lot of unique material that we have not seen anywhere else. For example we have hundreds of original recipes, supported by detailed instructions, of meat products that the Polish Communist Government made and sold in 1950-1989 in Polish stores. This was the Golden Era of Polish Meat Products when no chemicals were added.

    Our members are curious about sausage making in the Western countries and barbecuing and grilling techniques which have become increasingly popular in Poland. We will gladly answer any questions you might have and if there is a question that is hard to answer, there are dozens of professionals in our group in Poland that will come to the rescue.

    Stanley Marianski
     
  2. richtee

    richtee Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Hey Stan! I make a traditional Hungarian sausage called Kolbacz'... it's a pork sausage with heavy paprika and garlic... interesting project ya got goin' there. The Poles and the Hunkies make some of the best stuff in the world!

    Well, in MY humble opinion hehehe..

    Richtee...The Mad Hunky!
     
    shannon127 likes this.
  3. seminole

    seminole Fire Starter

    Hi Richtee,

    I agree, pork, garlic and Hungarian paprika is a wonderful combination. Beer, too.
    Besides, when they are smoked they develop beatiful red color.
    Original Spanish sausages (Longaniza, Chorizo and Sobrasada) always contain all of those ingredients, though they use Spanish paprika variation called pimenton. At least those sausage makers that have money to buy it. Others simply use paprika.
     
  4. cheech

    cheech Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    That is quite the site.

    I typically do not do that much sausage but it is good to know that when I do I have a wealth of knowledge available from this site.
     
  5. seminole

    seminole Fire Starter

    1. Polish Smoked Sausage (Polska Kielbasa Wedzona)

    The most popular Polish sausage and the only one that carries the word Polish in its name. Made of pork, salt, pepper and garlic. Marjoram is optional and sodium nitrite is added because meat is cured and smoked. This is how it has been made for 60 years, this is how it has been listed in Government manuals in 1959 and this is how it is made in Poland today. If you see more spices in a recipe it is due to the fact that people like to be creative and they distort the original recipe by creating their own version of the classic. Commercial meat processors are an exception as they have to add chemicals, binders and flavor intensifiers in order to keep the costs down and stay in business. Needless to say they make a pretty but awfully tasting product.

    In 1964 the Polish Government issued a second version of the sausage where in addition to 80% of pork, 20% of beef was also allowed. All spices and instructions remained the same. If you start reading labels on commercially made Polish Smoked Sausage you will see that pork, beef, turkey and chicken meat is used plus never ending litany of spices.

    Polish Smoked Sausage Recipe:

    Meat – 5 kg, good quality pork such as pork butt. If you use very lean meat such as ham or a lean part of a butt, don’t use more than 2 kg (40%) of it. Remaining 3 kg (60%) should be pork meat with more fat in it. Basically you can use 5 kg of pork butt.

    USA:
    Salt-90 g plus 12 g (2 teaspoons) of Cure #1 (it contains 93.75% salt and 6.25% of sodium nitrite). This will give you 2% salt in your sausage and the nitrite content will be 150 ppm (parts per million) which is below the American maximum allowed amount of 156 ppm.

    Europe:
    If you live in Europe use 100 g of Peklosol (it contains 99.40% salt plus 0.6% of sodium nitrite) and will give you also 2% salt in your sausage but your nitrite content will be 120 ppm which is below European maximum allowed amount of 150 ppm.

    Pepper – 6 g (3 teaspoons)
    Marjoram (optional) – 2.5 g (4 teaspoons)
    Sugar – 10 g (2 teaspoons)
    Garlic 3 g (1 – 2 cloves). You may increase that amount to up to 5 cloves (15 g)

    Some may wonder that so little spices were used. Well, if you use good meat and no chemicals you don’t need much spices otherwise you will distort the natural flavor of meat. Once you start adding extra ingredients like soy protein concentrate, MSG, phosphate, water, dry milk powder, sodium erythorbate and other wonders of modern meat science you will have to cover your tracks by adding larger amount of spices.

    Instructions:

    1. Meat is cured. This imparts a characteristic color and flavor to the meat. It also eliminates possibility of food poisoning (botulism) when smoking. This is especially important when smoking at low temperatures and this sausage was originally smoked with cold smoke and not cooked.

    Cut meat into 5 cm (2â€) pieces, add salt, sugar and Cure #1 (or Peklosol) and mix well together. Place in a suitable container, cover with a cloth to allow breathing and leave in a refrigerator for 48 hours.

    2. Grind through 10 - 13 mm (3/8â€) plate

    3. Mix with all spices. Originally the sausage was made with preservation in mind and no water was added as it would facilitate growth of bacteria (sausage was cold smoked but not cooked). Today we hot smoke it and you can add 1 cup of water during mixing what helps stuffing mixture into casings.Then mix everything together until mixture becomes gluey (sticky).

    4. Stuff into 32-36 mm hog casings and form 30 cm (1 foot) long links

    5. Hang it for 1 hour at room temperature until casings feel dry. You may place it into preheated to 54º C (130º F) smoker for 1 hour without applying smoke yet. Moist casing will not develop nice color as soot and other unburnt smoke particles will accumulate on the surface and will affect the taste as well.

    6. Smoke it with hot smoke (about 60º C, 140º F) for about 1-1.5 hours until casings become light brown. If you smoke it for 2-3 hours nothing will happen, it will have more pronounced smoky flavor, darker color and it will loose more moisture (you get less sausage). When smoking times are longer try to go easy on smoke, too much of a heavy smoke might make your product taste bitter.

    7. Now you have to cook it to 68 – 72º C (154 – 160º F). If you have a good smoker you can slowly increase temperature in the last stages of smoking and finish your sausage in a smoker. If your smoker has a weak heating element or you are smoking at low outside temperature, you may be better off to finish cooking by baking sausage in the kitchen oven.

    8. Store it in a refrigerator where it will keep very well.

    Recipe courtesy www.wedlinydomowe.com
     
    shannon127 likes this.
  6. seminole

    seminole Fire Starter

    Well, stop looking, it does not exist. The good news is that you can make the perfect sausage yourself every time as long as you obey the basic rules of sausage making. There are millions of sausage recipes floating for free on the Internet and your own creation will be as good or better. How do you know which ones are good? Do you think the professional sausage makers have time to play with recipes on the Internet? Many of these recipes are compiled by people who make a living off the Internet and they are college students, housewives, journalists and others.

    The easiest sausage to make is a fresh sausage which will be cooked on a frying pan, barbecued or grilled. Basically you are making a hamburger which will become a sausage once it is stuffed inside of the hog casing. Making smoked sausages requires more knowledge and here you have to observe your smoking and cooking temperatures. Fermented (air-dried) types are harder still and you have to worry about relative humidity.

    1. First ask yourself what would you like to have inside of your sausage: pork, beef, chicken, garlic, oregano, paprika etc. If you make a sausage for yourself or your family you don’t need any recipes; think of preparing a family meal that everybody will like.

    2. Keep it simple. Meat has its own beautiful flavor so don’t kill it with unnecessary spices. Many people add only salt when making a ham, saying that even pepper distorts the flavor. Polish Smoked Sausage is made of pork, salt, pepper and garlic (optional marjoram) yet most recipes include dozens of unnecessary ingredients and spices.

    3. You can use any type of meat or meat combinations. Just remember that meats containing sinews, gristle and tendons will have to be ground twice with a small grinder plate otherwise they will get stuck in your teeth. For a home based sausage maker nothing beats pork butt; it has the right fat to lean meat proportion, it is inexpensive and its little bone is very easy to remove. A sausage needs about 30% fat so don’t use only lean meats. Our commercially made fresh sausages contain up to 50% fat and our low calorie hot dogs can have up to 40% water and fat combined. Yes, we are paying dearly for water though it can not be seen. This magic is performed by a chemical called phosphate which traps and holds water inside.

    4. Salt in most modern recipes remains at about 1.5% - 2%. Original sausages were made with preservation in mind and the salt content was higher, up to 3%. Air dried products like countryside ham contained even more salt which was needed to prevent the growth of bacteria. Anything over 3% will taste too salty. Weigh in your meat, multiply by 0.018 (1.8%) and you will get the perfect amount of salt (1.8%) that will be acceptable to everybody. Salt plays the most important role in your recipe as this is where you can ruin your sausage. Once it is too salty, the only remedy that remains is to soak it overnight in cold water (in a refrigerator).

    5. Grinders. For thousands of years we have made sausages without grinders and certain classical sausages are still made by chopping meat with a knife (Polish Krakowska or Ham Sausage, Spanish Longaniza, Chorizo or Sobrasada). Don’t pre-occupy yourself too much with grinder plates. 3/8†size will take care of most tasks, unless you want to make emulsified sausages like hot dogs or bologna which will require grinding meats at least twice through a 1/8†plate. Commercial processors use a meat cutter which is more effective.

    6. Cold smoking was a method of meat drying for preservation and is seldom practiced today. Keep your hot smoke temperature at about 140º F (60º C) as you don’t want to cook your meat. Remember that meats smoked at this temperature are not safe to eat and must be cooked.

    7. Cook fresh sausages to 160º F (72º C) internal meat temperature. Smoked meats are normally cured with salt and sodium nitrite what provides additional safety and can be cooked to a slightly lower internal meat temperature of about 154º F – 160º F (68 – 72º C). They may may be poached in water at 176º F (80º C) or baked in an oven at the lowest temperature setting (below 190º F, 88º C) until desired internal meat temperature is obtained. Smoking or cooking sausages at too high temperatures will melt the fat inside, they will taste like bread crumbs and will be greasy on the outside. Remember, smoking meats is an art that is different from barbecuing or grilling.

    //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    In case you would like to know more about creating your own recipes, please check the following link where you will find even more information:

    http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/sausage-recipe-secrets.htm
     
  7. white cloud

    white cloud Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    For the info I love polish sausage and making it. Thanks again
     
  8. jocosa

    jocosa Meat Mopper

    As I've mentioned before, I do medieval reenacting - we're not the showy kind like Renn Faires, we research a lot about how things were done - from customs, to arts and cooking, and we use period recipes.

    At an event weekend before last there was a feast and one of the dishes was listed as "Polonian Sawsedges" and the recipe accompanied it - taken from the book "Delightes for Ladies" by Sir Hugh Plat, this had a date of 1594, altho I have also found publishing dates for this book for 1602.

    Anyway, Sir Hugh's 'sawsedge' recipe is thus:

    To make a Polonian Sawsedge: Take the fillers of a hog: chope them very small with a handfull of red Sage: season it hot with ginger and pepper, and then put it into a great sheep's gut: then let it lie three nights in brine: then boile it, and hang it up in a chimney where fire usually kept: and these sawsedges will last a whole yeere. They are good for sallades, or to garnish boiled meats, or to make on rellish a cup of wine.

    Translated -

    5 lbs pork butt, handful fresh purple sage, pork casings, 3 T cracked pepper corn, 2 T grated fresh ginger. Brine - salt, sugar, saltpeter, juniper berries, bay leaves, thyme, pepper, nutmeg and cloves.

    I've got the rest of the instructions if anyone is interested...

    These were some of the best sausages I've ever had... trays after trays were served at this feast... and four sauces to go with them.... gyngeuer, lumbard mustard, verde sawse, egredouncye... all just wonderful.

    These sausages and this one recipe is what will get me into sausage making... [​IMG]
     
  9. deejaydebi

    deejaydebi Smoking Guru

    That's a very informative site Stanley I have been there often. I am anciously waiting on your postings! I love making sauages!
     
  10. walking dude

    walking dude Smoking Guru SMF Premier Member

    DUDE.........glad to see you posting again..............LOVE your site as you well know.....

    i would also like to say........seminole is no NEWBIE..........this man knows his stuff

    d8de
     
  11. seminole

    seminole Fire Starter

    This is another Polish classical sausage. It is a fresh version of the Polish Smoked Sausage (Polska Kielbasa Wedzona). During Easter Holiday it can be found on every dining table and it is traditionally served with soup called "zurek". It is also a great sausage for grilling.

    If you look at the ingredients you will see that this sausage is very similar to Polish Smoked Sausage but it is made without sodium nitrite (cure #1 or Peklosol). Sodium nitrite is not needed as the sausage is not smoked.

    White Sausage Recipe:

    Meat:
    3.5 kg (80%), good quality pork such as pork butt
    0.5 kg (20%), beef
    Meat is not cured.


    Salt - 100 g
    Pepper – 6 g (3 teaspoons)
    Marjoram – 2.5 g (4 teaspoons)
    Sugar – 10 g (2 teaspoons)
    Garlic 3 g (1–2 cloves).You may increase that amount to up to 3 cloves (10 g)

    Instructions:

    1. Grind pork through 10 - 13 mm (3/8†or 1/2") plate
    Grind beef twice through 1/8" adding 45% of ice cold water (in relation to the weight of beef). This will be about 225 g (8 oz or 1 cup). You can emulsify beef better by using a food processor. Add salt and spices at this stage.

    2. Add 6% of water to ground pork (210 g, about 7 oz, a bit less than 1 cup) and mix until water is absorbed. Then add emulsified beef and mix everything well together.

    3. Stuff into 32-36 mm hog casings and leave sausage in a continuous coil.

    4. Let it dry for 15-30 min and place in a refrigerator. This is a fresh variety sausage and perishable. Cook it by boiling in water, frying in a pan or grilling.

    Note: This is basically the only well known fresh sausage in Poland. With exception of head cheeses, blood and liver sausages (some of them may also be smoked) all other well known classics are smoked sausages. Poland and Germany are the countries that love smoked meats.

    Recipe courtesy www.wedlinydomowe.com
     
  12. seminole

    seminole Fire Starter

    Kabanosy is probably the finest meat stick in the world. The name Kabanosy comes from the nickname â€kabanek†given to a young fat pig that was fed mainly potatoes in XIX Poland.

    Kabanosy Recipe:

    Meat – 5 kg, good quality pork such as pork butt.

    Salt – USA
    Salt-90 g plus 12 g (2 teaspoons) of Cure #1(it contains 93.75% salt and 6.25% of sodium nitrite). This will give you 2% salt in your sausage and the nitrite content will be 150 ppm (parts per million) which is below the American maximum allowed amount of 156 ppm.

    Salt - Europe
    If you live in Europe use 100 g of Peklosol (it contains 99.40% salt plus 0.6% of sodium nitrite) and will give you also 2% salt in your sausage but your nitrite content will be 120 ppm which is below European maximum allowed amount of 150 ppm.

    Pepper – 7.5 g (4 teaspoons)
    Sugar – 10 g (2 teaspoons)
    Nutmeg – 2.5 g (1 tsp)
    Caraway – 2.5 g (1 tsp)

    Some may wonder that so little spices were used. Well, if you use good meat and no chemicals you don’t need much spices otherwise you will distort the natural flavor of meat. Once you start adding extra ingredients like soy protein concentrate, MSG, phosphate, water, dry milk powder, sodium erythorbate and other wonders of modern meat science you will have to cover your tracks by adding larger amount of spices.

    Instructions:

    1. Meat is cured. This imparts a characteristic color and flavor to the meat. It also eliminates possibility of food poisoning (botulism) when smoking. This is especially important when smoking at low temperatures and this sausage was originally smoked with cold smoke and not cooked.

    Cut meat into 5 cm (2â€) pieces, add salt, sugar and Cure #1 (or Peklosol) and mix well together. Place in a suitable container, cover with a cloth to allow breathing and leave in a refrigerator for 48 hours.

    2. Grind through 8 mm (1/4 or 3/8â€) plate

    3. Mix with all spices. Originally the sausage was made with preservation in mind and no water was added as it would facilitate growth of bacteria (sausage was cold smoked but not cooked). Today we hot smoke it and you can add 1 cup of water during mixing what also helps to stuff mixture into casings. Then mix everything together until mixture becomes gluey (sticky).

    4. Stuff into sheep casings or hog casings not bigger than 22 mm. Stuff casings firmly forming 24†(60 – 70 cm) links. Hang in the middle on a smoking stick. Leave sausage links in a continuous coil.

    5. Hang it for 30 min at room temperature until casings feel dry. You may place it into preheated to 54º C (130º F) smoker for 30 min without applying smoke yet. Moist casing will not develop nice color as soot and other unburnt smoke particles will accumulate on the surface and will affect the taste as well.

    6. Smoke it with hot smoke (about 60º C, 140º F) for about 50 – 60 min then increase temperature to 170º – 190º F (76º – 88º C) and bake for 20 minutes. He casings should develop brown color and the internal meat temperature should be 68º – 70º C (154º – 158º F).

    7. If your smoker has a weak heating element or you are smoking at low outside temperature, you may be better off to finish cooking by baking sausage in the kitchen oven.

    8. Store it in a refrigerator where it will keep very well.

    Note: Original recipe called for drying Kabanosy for 5 – 7 days at 12º - 18º C (53º – 64º F) until sample sausages would demonstrate 55% yield (loose 45% of its original weight). Then the sausages were divided into previously twisted individual links. When the sausage is kept at above temperatures it will become drier, darker and better all the time. In time you will be able to break it with your fingers piece by piece.

    You can find more about Polish sausages at:
    www.wedlinydomowe.com/polish-sausages.htm
     
  13. richtee

    richtee Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Very well presented and explained, Sir! Top-notch!
     
  14. walking dude

    walking dude Smoking Guru SMF Premier Member

    glad to see you posting again seminole.........

    i got your email on your book........i fowarded it to all my family......hoping to get it for christmas........heheheeh


    d8de
     
  15. I read your page and I am on a low sodium diet. [​IMG] Is it possible to make sausage without adding salt to the mixture? And do you have a recipe for sausage spices that does not contain salt?
    Several members of my family have high blood pressure and want sausage but can't have it. I have vertigo and have to stay low sodium or I get sick.
    Granted if I were making sausage just for a friend I would use regular sausage seasoning recipes and not worry about the salt content. However I have to worry about it and would love to have a recipe that doesn't contain it.[​IMG]

    We tried making breakfast sausage this weekend and used it to stuff a pork loin. It was ok...but there was something missing (a tangy flavor you get with sausage). Any help you can give me in this matter will be GREATLY APPRECIATED! Thanks!
     
  16. deejaydebi

    deejaydebi Smoking Guru

    How about citric acid? That gives a bit of tang to the sausages.
     
  17. seminole

    seminole Fire Starter

    Smokin Mississippi Lady,

    1. Common salt is NaCl (sodium plus chloride). Too much sodium can increase blood pressure. Our body cannot produce sodium by itself and not enough of it will create problems for our nerve and muscular system. Sausage or not you need some sodium in your diet which most of us will get from canned items or prepared meals.
    2. But....there is another salt KCl (potassium plus chloride) which does not contain sodium (no high blood pressure) and now you have your answer. But...too much KCl will make your sausage bitter.
    3. This is what manufacturers do when making light-low sodium products. They combine both salts together to get a total of 16 g of salt per 1 kg of meat. That comes to 1.6% of salt in it. You can not use KCl only as anything over 6 g of KCl per 1 kg of meat can impart a bitter taste to your sausage and most people are able to taste it.
    Most sausages contain about 18-20 g of NaCl salt per 1 kg of meat.
    4. Make yourself a very light product: 6 g (1 teaspoon) of KCl plus 6-8 g (1 teaspoon) of NaCl per 1 kg of meat. This way you will have 12g (1.2%) or 14g (1.4%) of salt per 1 kg of meat. Sausage will taste good and you will have only 1/3 of sodium that a regular sausage might have.
     
  18. walking dude

    walking dude Smoking Guru SMF Premier Member

    darn seminole.......you are like batman........not around for ever.......but show up at the PERFECT time...........you GOOD



    d8de
     
  19. Some great information here.

    Sausage et al is next on my list of things to do and hopefully get good at.

    My Dad is into the sausage thing, and this site will be passed on to him.

    Thanks for the wealth of information,
     
  20. hank

    hank Fire Starter

    Been there during "The Communist Years" loved the kielbasa, hated the Cummunists, came here and made my own. Great post.

    Dziekuje serdecznie
    Heniek [​IMG]
     

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