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Prime Rib vs Rib Eye - Page 3

post #41 of 53

From all of the previous statements, it seems that the question of where the cuts of beef for "Prime Rib" or "Rib Eye" come from has been answered: They're both from the same cut & basically the same thing (the "Prime" in Prime Rib coming from the word "Primal Cut").

The other question that has been bandied about seems to be "What is considered to be "Prime Quality" beef?

It's been a few years, but the last time I looked, Beef grades are BASICALLY (for home & restaurant use) categorized by the USDA into (3) Grades (in raw form, at time of processing), based upon several factors, including (but not limited to) texture, fat marbling, feeding & genetic history (which breed) of the critter.

 

1): PRIME GRADE: The top 10% (in quality) of beef on the market. This is what you pay BIG bucks for in high-end restaurants & specialty butcher shops. Best flavor & tenderness.

 

2): CHOICE GRADE: The middle range, 70-90% (in quality) of market beef. This is what you normally (make sure to check) get in the local super market. Less flavor & tenderness than PRIME.

 

3): SELECT GRADE: The lower range, 50-70% (in quality) of market beef. Less flavor & tenderness than CHOICE.

 

There are other, lesser grades used for other purposes.

 

There are other processes involved (Dry or Wet Aging, etc.) to enhance the final product, but they don't have anything to do with the original USDA Grade.

 

My percentages may be currently off (like I said, it's been a while) but that's the basic info on USDA graded beef (unless the USDA came out with some different standard grades when I wasn't looking).

 

Mike

post #42 of 53
I know this is an older thread but thanks to my obsession with cooking and this site, I am fairly knowledgable about beef grading. So the other day, I emailed a local supermarket that I really love. I wasn't complaining just explaining that I know that what they are labeling as "USDA Inspected" Prime Rib is in fact select. Especially because it is by far the cheapest rib roast around and this is not a big chain that has enough buying power to get a really low price. I've purchases them and they eat more like an eye round which is great if cooked right, but much leaner. I just asked that they be honest to their loyal customers who might be less knowledgable about beef grading and label it appropriately so people don't think they are getting a better product than they are. Unfortunately, I didn't buy my rib roasts from them this year for 5.99/lb. but instead went to a larger chain and bought a beautifully marbled choice strip loin for 4.99/lb. Bought the whole 12 pounder... Have some roasts and reverse seared steaks in my future! Bonus... They originally weighed it incorrectly at check out since their was no barcode from the butcher... I made them aware of that and the manager gave me the incorrect price to thank me. Saved just shy of 10 more bucks!
post #43 of 53

You may know about beef grading, but...

 

A Prime rib is called that because it is cut from the Rib Primal of a Cow, Not because it has been graded as Prime. The proper term actually is a standing rib roast, but colloquially called a Prime Rib roast.

post #44 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK1 View Post

You may know about beef grading, but...

A Prime rib is called that because it is cut from the Rib Primal of a Cow, Not because it has been graded as Prime. The proper term actually is a standing rib roast, but colloquially called a Prime Rib roast.

True enough but they use that label in my opinion to mislead, not because it's a primal cut.
post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by worktogthr View Post

True enough but they use that label in my opinion to mislead, not because it's a primal cut.

Or, perhaps its because this roast was called Prime Rib more than 25 years before the advent of the USDA grading system and the grade of "USDA PRIME" ?

Here's an illustration from The Epicurean by Charles Ranhofer, 1894

(Charles Ranhofer (November 7, 1836 in Saint-Denis, France – October 9, 1899 in New York) was the chef at the famous Delmonico's Restaurant in New York from 1862 to 1876 and 1879 to 1896. Ranhofer was the author of The Epicurean (1894), an encyclopedic cookbook of over 1,000 pages, similar in scope to Escoffier's Le Guide Culinaire.)





The USDA grading system didn't come about until after 1925.
post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by worktogthr View Post


True enough but they use that label in my opinion to mislead, not because it's a primal cut.

That is your opinion, and you may choose to believe it or not. Don't let facts get in your way.

post #47 of 53

Demo9, awesome...I love history. The Epicurean is something worth acquiring, as is Gastronomique which I should have purchased when i first laid eyes on it...c'est la vie

No, French I don't speak, and Spanish very poorly...

post #48 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Demosthenes9 View Post

Or, perhaps its because this roast was called Prime Rib more than 25 years before the advent of the USDA grading system and the grade of "USDA PRIME" ?

Here's an illustration from The Epicurean by Charles Ranhofer, 1894

(Charles Ranhofer (November 7, 1836 in Saint-Denis, France – October 9, 1899 in New York) was the chef at the famous Delmonico's Restaurant in New York from 1862 to 1876 and 1879 to 1896. Ranhofer was the author of The Epicurean (1894), an encyclopedic cookbook of over 1,000 pages, similar in scope to Escoffier's Le Guide Culinaire.)





The USDA grading system didn't come about until after 1925.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AK1 View Post

That is your opinion, and you may choose to believe it or not. Don't let facts get in your way.

I just got served haha. The thing I don't like about the particular market I mentioned is that they will label certain cuts choice in the circular and the select cuts "USDA Inspected". Call a spade a spade!
post #49 of 53
I know this is an old thread but I read with interest the posts regarding the term "prime" rib. The term prime in prime rib does not refer to do with the grade or quality. Prime rib is one of the nine primal cuts of beef. Thats where the name prime rib comes from. For the longest time I also thought it meant the grade of the cut until the butcher at our local Market Street & Wikipedia educated me.

post #50 of 53

Check out the Texas Tech Meat Science website. They had/have a great powerpoint presentation on beef grading as well as the principles of ageing a carcass, like ossification, fat color, esp. abdominal fat and other factors.

This is where I learned that there are three grades of Prime and three grades of Choice.

Fascinating stuff for any carnivore...

post #51 of 53

I too live in Fla and recently my husband drove a hour away to get a real nice prime rib roast for Christmas dinner at $5.99 a lb. I didn't realize that Prime Rib roast was the same meat as rib eye steak. The reason we bought it was because we both just love rib eye steak we get when we dine out. It is usually our favorite. This rib roast was a huge disappointment to us let along out guests. It was chewy, hard not tender it was even difficult to cut. It was the worse rib steak we ever had. I was wondering if it was the same steak as prime rib and I have read it was so I am shocked to learn that. This roast ruined our Christmas dinner. I am hoping that if we buy it again from someplace else that it takes and cut and chews much better then that one did. We have been making roast and steaks all our lives (and we are in our 60's) never had we have such a awful experiance.

post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonnaR View Post
 

I too live in Fla and recently my husband drove a hour away to get a real nice prime rib roast for Christmas dinner at $5.99 a lb. I didn't realize that Prime Rib roast was the same meat as rib eye steak. The reason we bought it was because we both just love rib eye steak we get when we dine out. It is usually our favorite. This rib roast was a huge disappointment to us let along out guests. It was chewy, hard not tender it was even difficult to cut. It was the worse rib steak we ever had. I was wondering if it was the same steak as prime rib and I have read it was so I am shocked to learn that. This roast ruined our Christmas dinner. I am hoping that if we buy it again from someplace else that it takes and cut and chews much better then that one did. We have been making roast and steaks all our lives (and we are in our 60's) never had we have such a awful experiance.

 

Sorry to hear that, Donna!!

 

Here's what they should look like (14 of them):

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/138992/prime-rib-calendar-my-favorite-smokes

 

Bear

post #53 of 53

Sorry to hear about the bummer rib roast. Although at $5.99/lb i bet it was USDA Select or No Roll.

Reminds me of a rib-eye steak I purchased from a really small meat market in Denton Tx. The ones in the case weren't thick enough for me so I asked him to cut one.

He had to open a cryo-vac'd new one and he was kinda frustrated about it. When he presented the steak it was a deep ruby color, I figured it hadn't had enough time exposed to oxygen.

I was in a hurry and didn't check out the marbling either.

It was the same color when i got home and when I prepared to grill it. It was absolutely the toughest piece of meat I EVER tried to eat.

I theorize that the animal was not allowed to complete the rigor process and was cut in to primals too soon after slaughter.

I've never seen a more ruby colored piece of meat since.... but if I do, I'll know

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