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No Roll Ribeye - Page 2

post #21 of 32

I doubt if I would keep a raw steak in the fridge more than 5 days, unless part of that was thawing from frozen---and definitely not a couple weeks.

 

 

Bearcarver

post #22 of 32

yup!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post

I doubt if I would keep a raw steak in the fridge more than 5 days, unless part of that was thawing from frozen---and definitely not a couple weeks.

 

 

Bearcarver

post #23 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DUFFMAN View Post

So as long as you are keeping it cold yo keep a peice of meat like that in the fridge for a few weeks? Dose that apply to all beef or just bigger cuts?

 

From what I have been reading wet aging can be done with primal cuts in unbroken cryovac packs for up to 6 weeks from the kill date.

I was unable to determine the kill date, but I believe I will be alright going 10 days past the sell by date.

 

I understand it's being done in all the fine steak houses

post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arnie View Post



 

From what I have been reading wet aging can be done with primal cuts in unbroken cryovac packs for up to 6 weeks from the kill date.

I was unable to determine the kill date, but I believe I will be alright going 10 days past the sell by date.

 

I understand it's being done in all the fine steak houses


I'm not saying that's not true, but all of my searches say not beyond a few days in the fridge. Do you have a link to any of those places you've been reading?

 

Thanks,

Bear

post #25 of 32

I worked for a food service distiributor before and a steak resturaunt used to refuse boxes of meat that hadn't aged at least 30 days in the cooler from the date it was cryo'd and the meat was fine after 30 days.

post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by cromag View Post

I worked for a food service distiributor before and a steak resturaunt used to refuse boxes of meat that hadn't aged at least 30 days in the cooler from the date it was cryo'd and the meat was fine after 30 days.


Like I said, I'm not saying things like that are not true. I just can't find anything in writing from a reputable place that supports that. Yet I can find many (including USDA) that say not to keep in fridge beyond a few days. Therefore, I personally would not do that.

 

 

Bearcarver

post #27 of 32

The difference is "fridge" and "aging cooler".   To properly age meat you must strictly control all aspects of the aging process, from temp to humidity to no. of times temp gradient is disturbed (like opening the fridge door), rotation, etc, controls you can not hope to achieve in a fridge.  So what you might accomplish with proper aging you could just as easily poison someone with improper aging, regardless if the COV is kept intact or not.  Best is to hold the meat in the fridge within a day or overnight before processing, then use it or freeze it.  You don't know what external contamination you've come in contact with (did you get the piece from the meatcase?  Who else touched it?  Someone sneeze on it?  Did you sanitize it before tossing it into your own fridge?  Why not?  And so on..).   

post #28 of 32
Thread Starter 
post #29 of 32

Hey all, I've seen my fair share of meats go bad in the fridge after just 2-3 days...I definitely would not want to risk tossing a nice piece of meat by deliberately tilting the tables and trying to age it without absolute certainty that I was doing it according a proven method with similar/identical equipment to what I had to work with.

If I'm not cooking it within 24-36 hours of getting it home, it gets frozen...period. And, anything which gets put into the fridge to thaw, I consider suspect after 3-4 days of fridge time if it's a smaller cut like a steaks, chops, chix pieces, etc. Anything I consider to be suspect, I pitch in the trash...no sense getting someone sick over a piece of meat.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyDrewsky View Post

That looks delicious! I would prefer a nice thick steak with that cut any day... but as fatty as it is, has anyone ever thought about pulling something like that... sort of like you would a chuckie, only with more meat?



IMHO, it would be sacrilege to pull a beef rib roast...it's among the best cuts for steak or slicing from the whole roast, and extremely good eating as such, that's why it's so hard to find at what most of would consider to be a decent sale price.

 

If you're looking for a long smoke for pulled beef, a full packer brisket will get you there for about 2 bucks/lb in the right stores.

 

Eric

post #30 of 32

 

Thanks for the links Arnie,

They are very interesting, to say the least. I would still not do this at my house, nor would I advise others to try this, but I really do appreciate your taking time to post these links. So far I only read a little more than half of them. I guess I'm just a little more strict than your link from "ehow" (below). They say "Beef should NOT be aged for more than a week by non-professionals". I say NOT more than a few days.
 

 

Tips & Warnings (from ehow)

  •  
    Wet aging beef is more economical than dry aging beef because none of the original cut is lost during the process.
  •  
    Wet aged beef is incredibly tender because the airtight plastic prevents it from losing juices. It is, however, less flavorful than dry aged beef.
  •  
    Critics of wet aged beef argue that the process tenderizes the beef but prevents the meat from developing much flavor.
  •  
    Beef should NOT be aged for more than a week by non-professionals. After one week, it is very important to keep the environment precisely controlled in order to prevent harmful bacteria from growing on the meat.

Thanks Again Arnie,

Bearcarver
 

post #31 of 32
Thread Starter 

It goes on to say, as some of the other site do, "After one week, it is very important to keep the environment precisely controlled in order to prevent harmful bacteria from growing on the meat.

 

It's not to be done haphazardly or by anyone unable to control the aging environment

You should read the information on dry aging. Now that’s scary!

post #32 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arnie View Post

It goes on to say, as some of the other site do, "After one week, it is very important to keep the environment precisely controlled in order to prevent harmful bacteria from growing on the meat.

 

It's not to be done haphazardly or by anyone unable to control the aging environment

You should read the information on dry aging. Now that’s scary!


Yup, I have read some, but it's way over my pay grade. I like to keep it simple & safe. I guess the pros that do that all of the time don't think it's scary, like most people think chainsaw carving is scary too. At my age, I'm not gonna try to figure anything out like aging meat at home.

 

Bear

 

 

 

 

 

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