New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

am i confused - Page 2

post #21 of 32
Here's a great brine recipe for chicken and good info, too: http://www.3men.com/competition%20chicken.htm

I might email them and see if they would let us put that in our Wiki.
post #22 of 32
Thread Starter 

thanks all,i will try the 2 birds and see which comes out the best. thanks to all who came back

post #23 of 32

I always Brine my Bird. However, I got some good advice on this site about Brining which is, If you Brine, leave the salt out of the rub or cut it in 1/2 or more. I usually just leave the salt out of the rub.

post #24 of 32

Brining will give you a wider margin of error for cooking.

 

I did a 22 lb turkey brined for 24 hours and cooked it on a camping trip on a "Camp Chef" stove top with "Camp Chef Keg Roaster"

The Keg Roaster says it will fit 3 chickens or a 20lb turkey, I had no problem getting a 22 pounder in there.

 

To date this has been the best turkey I have ever eaten.

 

KILLENS 08 014.jpgKILLENS 08 021.jpgKILLENS 08 022.jpg

 

KILLENS 08 020.jpg

KILLENS 08 029.jpg

 

And I got a bunch of happy campers that agreed.

post #25 of 32

would like to try the brined, smoked and  "cured" chicken.  when you say exact amount of curing agent -- how much is that?  per chicken or per quart of brining liquid??? 

post #26 of 32

has anyone ever thought their chicken was too moist after a brine?

 

i smoked a whole fryer (~4lb bird) after a 2 or 3 hour brine and thought it was too moist if thats even possible.  i smoked it sitting on the grate right above the water pan which might have added to the moisture problem.

 

FWIW i think unbrined beer can chicken is about the perfect level of moisture when it comes to those little whole fryer chickens.

post #27 of 32

We are working with three different, totally separate methods.

 

1)   MARINATING

 

When marinating something, you are adding different ingredients to the original product that is modifying the original through a acid/base method to enhance the original.   For example, you take sliced cucumbers.  Add some lemon juice for acid, counter with a base of corn syrup for sweetness, and now you have marinated sweet/sour cucumbers. You can marinate vegetables, fruits, meats, poultry, fish, etc. with almost any combination of ingredients to enhance or counter its natural flavors.

 

2)  BRINING

 

Brining is a method of adding salt to meat, fish and poultry along with other similar ingredients to enhance it's flavoring through osmosis, which simply means you are achieving a new equilibrium of meat and salt combined.  This adds a preserving method to the meat with added salt.  Salt is a flavor enhancer.  It also adds moisture into the meat  Therefore, brining adds more flavoring via the addition of salt.  Of course, other ingredients can be added, but it does NOT change the composition of the meat itself.... a brined chicken leg is still a chicken leg that is saltier.

 

3)  CURING

 

The last step is curing.  A curing agent ALTERS the composition of the meat (poultry, fish, etc.) by adding sodium nitrite to the meat.  (You can research all the different variants but today's accepted ingredient is 6.25% sodium nitrite in volume).  The most common method is adding it with salt in a brine.  Then you cure, or pickle, the meat for a time, then smoke it.  What you achieve is a cured and smoked product that has the characteristics of hams, bacons, etc.   that classic familiar flavor we all love!   

You can brine AND cure chickens and turkeys for smoking, but this alters the poultry into a cured and smoked product with similarities like ham with that hammy flavor.  A cured and smoked turkey is a delicacy to truly enjoy!

 

There's a lot of other things that occur when smoking meats too, but to help clarify these particular processes and their differences this should help!

 

post #28 of 32

I use 1 cup sugar, 1 cup salt, 1 cup brown sugar and 1 tablespoon DQ Curing salt from Butcher Packer.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by losyeny View Post

would like to try the brined, smoked and  "cured" chicken.  when you say exact amount of curing agent -- how much is that?  per chicken or per quart of brining liquid??? 

post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by dDigitalPimp View Post

has anyone ever thought their chicken was too moist after a brine?

 

i smoked a whole fryer (~4lb bird) after a 2 or 3 hour brine and thought it was too moist if thats even possible.  i smoked it sitting on the grate right above the water pan which might have added to the moisture problem.

 

FWIW i think unbrined beer can chicken is about the perfect level of moisture when it comes to those little whole fryer chickens.


You don't mean MUSHY do you?

Was it a texture thing maybe?

post #30 of 32

for Pops 6927-- thanks for list for curing poultry.  still confused  -- how much water?  Do you inject or just brine?  for how long?  with that info I'll have a turkey breast ready to go.    thanks

post #31 of 32

heh.... SO sorry.... forgot - 1 gallon of water!   If you have more than one just double or triple as necessary.  But for each gallon of water add the listed ingredients, then brine for minimum overnight.  I've cured turkeys for 3 - 5 days plus injected the breasts too:

 

post #32 of 32

Am I getting this right -- the difference between a cured turkey and a brined turkey is that it will taste more "hammy" when cured?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Poultry