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Lang firebox

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Found a used Lang patio model and hauled it back to Denver through the very windy barren wasteland commonly known as Wyoming a couple of weeks ago. It is in perfect condition, as it was less than two years old. I was finally able to invite a few friends over and try it out this past weekend. Cooked up 6 slabs of baby backs, two chickens and a big pot of smoked beans. Everything turned out perfect. Maintained a pretty steady 230 degrees until the end using apple wood. Sorry that I didnt take pics for the qview, next time.

Only issue I have is with the firebox. Towards the end of smoking, 6 hours total, I couldnt maintain a temp above 200 degrees. I'm pretty sure this was due to the ash buildup under the firegrate. I was wondering if others have had this problem. Has anyone raised the level of the grate to allow move ash to accumalate? What would you do for a long smoke duration like 12 hours or so when doing a butt? Any suggestions? Once I got the coal bed established, I added a log about every 45 minutes.

Also, searching for a name for it. The man that used to own it died from H1N1 this past winter. I was thinking to name it 'Swine Flue' in his honor and paint Swine on the smokestack (ie flue).
post #2 of 16
I have never even come close to that problem with my 48 patio..I have smoked for 18 hours straight on it before and the ashes were never even close to being a problem...Not sure what to tell ya on that one.Maybe some1 will be along who can help ya a bit more...Happy smokes.
post #3 of 16
I'll ask a dumb question: Were you using charcoal briquettes? Lump coal and wood burn down to almost nothing, while briquettes have clay and other binders that leave a significant amount of ash.

In any case, here's a solution: Ensure your fire grate is high enough that you can at least clean it out periodically while smoking. Odds are that when it's that high, if you're burning all lump and wood you won't need to clean it til the smoke is done.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
it was all apple wood with a little bit of hickory. no charcoal at all. The fire was kinda against the smoking chamber and not in the middle of the grate. Ash could have just clogged there.
post #5 of 16
How often did add wood to the fire? One thing that I've done is to raise up the fire grate about another inch.
post #6 of 16
when the temps are down, you need more fuel. if you add fuel and the temp does not rise. more fuel is needed. get the flames back up. open the dampers. then when it goes above temp. regulate it back to where you want it.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Answers were about what I was thinking. Raise the grate an inch or two, crank the heat and airflow. I would have added more wood but had two pieces in there burning and was at the tail end of the smoke. thanks for the help.
post #8 of 16
I have my grate up 2 " of the bottom of the box.
post #9 of 16
Hey Wyoming isn't a barren wasteland....ok well a lot is but not about 30% or so...lol..glad you found a answer
post #10 of 16
Mines up about 2-1/2 inches and never had a problem, i have smoked over 15 hrs on it before, i do sometimes stir the ashes around alittle to help get more air in.
post #11 of 16
Well I have the 48 mobile and never had that issure. I do keep a fireplace shovel around and a piece of rebar for stiring the coals at times.
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
wonder if the previous owner modified it....mine is only about an inch above the bottom....what would you use to lift it higher? i'm thinking to go buy some steel pipe caps to set the legs on.
post #13 of 16
I have also seen the fire boxes lined with fire brick and the grat on top of it. for me it would raise my grate to about 4"s and still 2"s above the brick if I did it.
I am wondering if this would stop ? help? heat loss from the bottom. not sure. but am going to give it a whirl when I find some fire brick.
post #14 of 16

Good Name

I can't add to the suggestions you have received. However, I like the name Swine Flue.
post #15 of 16
I was thinking about lining my firebox with brick as well.
post #16 of 16
I will keep my firebox the way it is. Raise it up for more airflow is a good idea if you need to if ash is choking the fire, but I am a firm beliver in cleaning it out after a cook. Ash attracts moisture and changes the PH causing rust. Call me paranoid if you want but with bricks in the firebox ash is going to get between them and under them and cause corrosion and I value my cooker too much to take chances.
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