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I will do science to it! Smoke + Sous Vide - Page 4

post #61 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by keithd View Post

Please look at this link:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/03/how-to-sous-vide-steak.html

 

This is what is meant when talking about pre-sear for sous vide. For Q and grilling, maybe not, but in sous vide terminology pre-seared meat means meat that's seared before hitting the water oven.

 

If I'm wrong, I apologise, but sous vide is one of my hobbies.

 

The author of the article at the link you provided uses the term correctly in the title of his temp chart and incorrectly in the text.

I cannot speak to the rationale of internet authors who want to invent new ways to to abuse the English language, but to use the term "pre-sear" when you mean to say "sear" and "post-sear" when you mean to say "sear after cooking" is not clear and concise communication IMHO.  


Edited by cliffcarter - 7/13/12 at 3:59am
post #62 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffcarter View Post

 

The author of the article at the link you provided uses the term correctly in the title of his temp chart and incorrectly in the text.

I cannot speak to the rationale of internet authors who want to invent new ways to to abuse the English language, but to use the term "pre-sear" when you mean to say "sear" and "post-sear" when you mean to say "sear after cooking" is not clear and concise communication IMHO.  

Depends on how it is being used, like so much of the English language context is key.

 

If you talk about applying seasoning pre or post sear you are talking about before or after the sear.  But we are talking about pre or post searing, so it has gone from an adjective to a verb.  So as a verb pre sear means to sear before, and that is the way it is being used here.

 

Bad pedant, no biscuit.

post #63 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponderingturtle View Post

Depends on how it is being used, like so much of the English language context is key.

 

If you talk about applying seasoning pre or post sear you are talking about before or after the sear.  But we are talking about pre or post searing, so it has gone from an adjective to a verb.  So as a verb pre sear means to sear before, and that is the way it is being used here.

 

Bad pedant, no biscuit.

Let's see... pre-sear means "before(the)sear"... but you want it to mean "sear before", I contend that, in proper English usage and in the context which it is being used in the discussion of the method of cooking meat sous vide, you can say "sear pre sous vide" or "sear post sous vide" and create a concise description of what you mean, instead of just dancing around it.

 

Bad English, no steak.

If I want a biscuit I make them myself.  

post #64 of 77

Well sorry I'm so late to the game here!  Just ordered my Haake Immersion circulator- originally I was using my cheapo smoker controller to run a circulation pump with a bucket heater, but after it finally bit the dust, I decided to get a pro unit- I never did trust the think for longer cooks, so I'm really looking forward to brisket sous vide with a smoker finish- see if I can still get a good smoke ring with the ol stick burner.  

 

Just food for thought on this one, but with the price of the sous vide equipment out there, I'm surprised that a quality unit hasn't popped up in the same price range as turkey fryers and the like- the electric turkey fryer with an electronic instead of manual temp controller could easily be a solid sous vide or fryer.... I know there are folks that hack it with an external controller, but sure would be nice to have a single unit that does both from the factory.

 

Great posts all, and definitely keep it safe!

post #65 of 77

As sous vide becomes more mainstream I'm sure the equipment will become much cheaper as more and larger manufacturers step into the game. Personally, I think sous vide will one day become hugecause it's simple to do & yields tremendous results. For example I just picked up a 2# beef chuck roast for under $6.00. I browned it in a pan with salt & pepper, bagged it using Ziploc Vacuum Bags, & put it in my cooker. That took less than 10 minuted. In two days I'll have a delicious, tender, medium rare hunk of beef that rivals prime rib! I envision food manufactures offering  sous vide ready frozen (or refrigerated) center of the plate entrees in the future.

post #66 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by zackly View Post

As sous vide becomes more mainstream I'm sure the equipment will become much cheaper as more and larger manufacturers step into the game. Personally, I think sous vide will one day become hugecause it's simple to do & yields tremendous results. For example I just picked up a 2# beef chuck roast for under $6.00. I browned it in a pan with salt & pepper, bagged it using Ziploc Vacuum Bags, & put it in my cooker. That took less than 10 minuted. In two days I'll have a delicious, tender, medium rare hunk of beef that rivals prime rib! I envision food manufactures offering  sous vide ready frozen (or refrigerated) center of the plate entrees in the future.

Maybe maybe not.  It would be a workable idea, but it might run afoul of regulation, see all the resturants that got prevented from using this technique.  So it could require a change in regulation to permit this.

post #67 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by keithd View Post

FWIW,

 

For brisket I sous vide for about 36 hours (usually 24-48 hours), then smoke in a MES 40 with an AMNPS for 6-8 hours until a decent bark has formed. Completely naked - no rubs, nothing. No trimming, packer cut brisket from the store.
 

After sous vide cooking, I have to be real careful to not tear the brisket apart trying to get it into the smoker.

 

As far as the results? Considering I lose 1/2 to 1 lbs even before I cut it up from co-workers picking at the brisket like vultures, I'd say it turns out OK.

DO you cut up that packer cut Keith or leave it whole and use the bag it comes in (usually cryo) What temp is your Sous Vide? What temp is your smoker? If this was a troll started post - it is the best one ever!

 

I just got a PolyScience Sous Vide, and really want to use it in conjunction with my multitude of grilling devices!

post #68 of 77

I have not read the whole thread.

 

Relatively new to this forum.

 

Sous vide + smoke = ultimate "low & slow"

 

What I have been playing with recently.

 

dcarch

post #69 of 77

I'll take a Maverick food probe...take my steak to 130-135 depending on thickness in a smokey environment, 1 minute hot sear on each side and rest it. 

 

It'll be just as perfectly done on the inside...maybe for folks with out smokers this is an option?

post #70 of 77

What sous vide can give me is this:

 

I can have a piece of meat, doesn't matter how small, how big, or how heavy, completely frozen from the freezer, without thawing, dump it in the sous vide cooker, set the temperature, say 134 F for brisket, and walk away and go to sleep. and not having to check anything for 48 hours (some cuts of meat up to 72 hours)

 

The cooking temperature will be guaranteed to be at 134F, not 133F, or 135F the entire time.

 

The entire piece of meat, inside and outside will be exactly 134F. There is no need to poke around with a thermometer.

 

dcarch

post #71 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by FWIsmoker View Post

I'll take a Maverick food probe...take my steak to 130-135 depending on thickness in a smokey environment, 1 minute hot sear on each side and rest it. 

 

It'll be just as perfectly done on the inside...maybe for folks with out smokers this is an option?

The end result is totally different between the two methods

post #72 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post

What sous vide can give me is this:

 

I can have a piece of meat, doesn't matter how small, how big, or how heavy, completely frozen from the freezer, without thawing, dump it in the sous vide cooker, set the temperature, say 134 F for brisket, and walk away and go to sleep. and not having to check anything for 48 hours (some cuts of meat up to 72 hours)

 

The cooking temperature will be guaranteed to be at 134F, not 133F, or 135F the entire time.

 

The entire piece of meat, inside and outside will be exactly 134F. There is no need to poke around with a thermometer.

 

dcarch

 

Or you can take that same steak, thaw it in the fridge for two days, season it, sear and then cook to smoky perfection in about 10 minutes. No added expense to the electric bill or worrying that the power goes out while you are away.

I do agree with the thermometer statement, though.

post #73 of 77

Hey folks..... Lets not start "My dad can beat up your dad"....  Keep it civil.....

 

Dave

post #74 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post

Hey folks..... Lets not start "My dad can beat up your dad"....  Keep it civil.....

 

Dave

Dcarch.....I just noticed you have not checked in at Roll Call!  Would you mind popping in there and allowing us to give you a proper SMF Welcome!? http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/f/133/roll-call
 

We can also give you some links with the guidelines and rules here in the Forums.

 

Kat


Edited by KathrynN - 6/27/13 at 9:52pm
post #75 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post

Hey folks..... Lets not start "My dad can beat up your dad"....  Keep it civil.....

 

Dave

 

My post is a model of civility IMHO.

post #76 of 77

When I first got into sous vide cooking about 5 years ago I went a little overboard cooking everything imaginable sous vide, much like you see BBQ zealots baking cakes in their smokers. Now I use it mostly for tough cuts of beef like chuck roasts & short ribs (cooked days not hours) as well as soft boiled eggs in the shell. Being able to produce rare pot roast or short ribs is something special and not to be missed. Another great use is cooking boneless/skinless chix breast. You can safely cook them @ 140F for 3 hours, which yield a very moist breast. As for steaks, I don't see the benefit of sous vide. In fact the steak comes out of the bag very wet from its rendered juices which inhibits browning. However, as the OP mentioned it's great for cooking a frozen steak.

I think there is a lot of anti-snobbery surrounding sous vide. Maybe because of the French name? Unknown things frighten us all. Although I'm a retired chef and CIA grad I'm as down home as they get when it comes to cooking . I cook every day. I love cooking and it's nice now to experiment leisurely with new ingredients, recipes & techniques. I have only scraped the surface of cooking knowledge.It's a continuous process. I think of my sous vide equipment as I do my crock pots, which I use all the time. 

post #77 of 77

"-----I think there is a lot of anti-snobbery surrounding sous vide. Maybe because of the French name? Unknown things frighten us all.------"

 

Sous vide is NOT cooking under pressure and it has nothing to do with vacuum.

 

It is very a very simple cooking method. It is cooking by temperature controlled water bath.

 

It used to cost several thousand dollars for the equipment, Now you can DIY a very good system for less than $50.00.

 

A BGE with a BBQ Guru attachment is very similar to sous vide. It is cooking by temperature controlled air.  

 

dcarch

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