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smoking bacon... COLD OR HOT SMOKE? - Page 2

post #21 of 64
Thread Starter 

radiant barrier

Piney,
I have a seperate roof over my smokers and it works great. I have a radiant barrier installed on the underside of the roof and the warmest it gets in my smoke area is 95 degrees, even in the dead of a Louisana summer. I also have 3 speed commercial fans above my smokers, but below the roof to get rid of the smoke. I also have 3 speed commercial fans that blow cool air (these fans are installed low to the ground) in to the area. I'm sure your summers are as brutal as ours and these things really make being in the room a lot better. Anyway, if you need any installation methods let me know and I will be glad to help
Thanks,
Greg
post #22 of 64
Thread Starter 

qview of smoked bacon, ponce (stuffed pork stomach), Turkey Tasso and Pork Sausage

I have a couple of Qview shots of my bacon after being hot smoked. I wanted to cold smoke, but I was smoking 8 briskets, 12 pork butts, 5 ponces (pork sausage in a pork stomach), Pork Tasso, Turkey Sausage, pork sausage and garlic pork sausage, so I couldn't juggle the cold smoking for this run. I like the way it came out. I used 3 different dry cure recipes. For all 3 I used the basic dry cure rub from charcuterie. Dry cure 1 consisted only of the basic dry cure from chartuterie. dry cure 2 consisted of the basic dry cure rub from charcuterie + 1tbs of garlic powder, onions powder, paprika and dried mustard, dry cure recipe 3 consisted of the basic dry cure rub from charcuterie + 2 tbs of our tasso seasoning. I used Steens cane syrup in lieu of maple syrup for sweetness. Anyway, trying to do this q-view for the first time i'll give it a shot.
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post #23 of 64
Which of the (3) bacon recipes did you like best?


Todd

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

Reply
post #24 of 64
Thread Starter 
I liked the one with the seasonings we use for our Tasso, but the the recipe with the onion powder, garlic powder, etc. was a close second. I think if we sale the bacon at our restaurant / specialty meats store we would stick with the more traditional seasoning mix. By the way, I really like the flavor that the steens cane syrup gave. It really added a regional flare to the recipe.
post #25 of 64

Great thread here.  Thanks all.

post #26 of 64

Were you able to generate smoke at that temp?  I have heard that the MES has trouble with generating smoke below 180F.  I am getting one in a few days and I would love to move my bacon production to the MES.

post #27 of 64


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinSteve View Post

Were you able to generate smoke at that temp?  I have heard that the MES has trouble with generating smoke below 180F.  I am getting one in a few days and I would love to move my bacon production to the MES.

Not a problem, Buy an A-MAZE-N-SMOKER and that will solve all your cold smoke problems...  A bunch of members here have the A-MAZE-N-SMOKER and the MES Smokers and will swear by them.

http://www.amazenproducts.com/Products.html

post #28 of 64
When cold smoking do I need to have my bowl of water in the smoker. I have an mes30 using the amnps. Thanks
post #29 of 64

Hi Flyers37

 

No you do not need the bowl of water. There will be water vapour produced from the smoke generator and you don't want to be adding any more.

post #30 of 64
thanks. That what I thought.
post #31 of 64

Interesting thread for a butcher friend is going to give me 2-3 big chunks of thick sliced bacon.   Can I cold smoke sliced bacon if left in a layered configuration (as what we normally see when buying sliced bacon)?

post #32 of 64

I have never tried doing it that way. My feeling though that it would be best smoked spread out for a short period of time. Maybe someone else on here has experience of doing this.

post #33 of 64
OK, I am going to be curing my first pork belly tomorrow. In 7 days, I plan to smoke it with apple pellets in my AMAZEN pellet smoker in my mailbox modification with my MES 40. My question, which seems to have multiple answers is, do I completely cold smoke it? And for how long? Or smoke with heat, at what temperature and for how long? We obviously don't want it to taste like a forest fire, but definitely want that yummy applewood smoked flavor. :)

Thanks.

Oh, just planning on curing powder, salt and brown sugar for the cure. With possibly maple syrup or honey. Any suggestions on something else since I have a big enough slab I could do two different flavors?
post #34 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by id2nv2nj2ca View Post

OK, I am going to be curing my first pork belly tomorrow. In 7 days, I plan to smoke it with apple pellets in my AMAZEN pellet smoker in my mailbox modification with my MES 40. My question, which seems to have multiple answers is, do I completely cold smoke it? And for how long? Or smoke with heat, at what temperature and for how long? We obviously don't want it to taste like a forest fire, but definitely want that yummy applewood smoked flavor. :)

Thanks.

Oh, just planning on curing powder, salt and brown sugar for the cure. With possibly maple syrup or honey. Any suggestions on something else since I have a big enough slab I could do two different flavors?


Some People Prefer Cold Smoking all the way, which gives a great product over time.

 

I prefer what I call "Warm Smoking" (between 100° and 130° smoker temp).

I find I get great color and flavor in no longer than 8 to 11 hours that way.

 

Here is a Step by Step of how I do it:

 
 
Bear
post #35 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by id2nv2nj2ca View Post

OK, I am going to be curing my first pork belly tomorrow. In 7 days, I plan to smoke it with apple pellets in my AMAZEN pellet smoker in my mailbox modification with my MES 40. My question, which seems to have multiple answers is, do I completely cold smoke it? And for how long? Or smoke with heat, at what temperature and for how long? We obviously don't want it to taste like a forest fire, but definitely want that yummy applewood smoked flavor. :)

Thanks.

Oh, just planning on curing powder, salt and brown sugar for the cure. With possibly maple syrup or honey. Any suggestions on something else since I have a big enough slab I could do two different flavors?

 

This is what I did my last batch....   Best bacon I ever made...    Basically, 14 days in the cure... 7 days rest in the refer...  4-24 hours cold smoke below 70 deg. F....   7 days rest in the refer.. partially freeze and slice....

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/231994/costco-bellies-thanks-for-the-lead-on-that-dry-brined-bacon-aug-2015-8-23-money-update

post #36 of 64

Id2, you will hear different opinions. Personally, they are all correct, it just depends on what you like. I recently did some (title is Belly Bacon - 3 day smoke) where I kept the temps in between 100 and 120 for the majority of the time in my MES 30. The heat came solely from my AMZNPS burning pecan pellets. I love that temp because it gives the bacon a great color.

 

As for toppers when curing, after I cured and before I refer'ed overnight before smoking, I dusted the top with onion powder, garlic powder and fresh cracked black pepper. You can distinctly taste those flavors even after baking. Try it out if you are looking for an alternative.

post #37 of 64
Just checking in so I can find thread later. Good info here
post #38 of 64
Just checking in too, will fill more about me later. Trying to cold smoke some bacon for a gift yay,if we don't eat it first. I've only done warm smoke before, which all loved. Cold smoke in BGE with amazn smoker...
post #39 of 64

Thread... RISE FROM YOUR GRAVE!!!

 

Ok, I plan to smoke about 10 pounds of pork belly for bacon maybe as early as next weekend.

 

This thread has great info and debate on cold vs hot.  I am thinking I will do a little of both cold'ish and hot smoking but only because I don't know if they produce a different texture.  I'm sure I can get the smoke flavor with either approach.. 

 

My questions are:

 

1. When fried, is the texture of the bacon any different when cold smoked (no heat) vs hot smoked ( IT 145F)?

2. If so what is the texture like cold smoked?         (I imagine the same as what store bought produces)

3. If so what is the texture liked hot smoked ( IT 145F)?

 

 

I personally like soft bacon but most people I know like crispy bacon.  I would like to be able to produce both types of textures but have read some cases where the bacon doesn't get crispy.  I know my Ground Formed Bacon wouldn't get crispy like bacon but GFB is a different ballgame.  Once I know what will be produced I may plan to do both types of smokes to then see which one I like best or stick with the approach that gives me the soft or crispy texture after frying. 

 

I am thinking I would prefer hot smoking because I like shorter times vs half a day smoking.  I like the idea of being able to eat the bacon when it comes out of the smoker (provided I go to a safe IT) of when it is cold.  Finally, reports are that the color and smoke absorption is better at higher/hot temps.  

 

Your answers to the questions and feedback are greatly appreciated :)

post #40 of 64

I can't give you any answers but I will be waiting with some questions, I will be ready to do some in may and am doing research for it.

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