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game hens

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
so wife brought some game hens home and we are gonna do them sunday on the UDS. what should be my plan of attack as far as brining goes. is that really necessary on a drum. any tips appreciated.
post #2 of 15
Take a look at this one from Chef Rob - I cant wait to try them

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
i did see those and showed the wife i think thats how i got them. anyway not sure about the brineing as i'm using a drum which is pretty much an oven so wondering if that steps really necissary
post #4 of 15
tader, i would brine them for no more than 1-2 hrs.........dem li'l birds don't take much.
post #5 of 15
Yeah, small birds don't need much. When I did a game hen, I brined it about 2hrs in a fairly standard brine. I would smoke it at about 275 or so, like many people smoke chicks and Turkeys. I usually spatchcock the bird, then rub or marinade it when I do it on a grill or oven. Im pretty sure after brining, I just basted it with olive oil when I smoked it. Turned out really good and extremely juicy. I'd say brine it for an hour with any one of the brines you will find on this site, then give it a rub, let it set for an hour, than smoke to 165 and enjoy.
post #6 of 15
Put some flavor in the brine....ie herbs. I agree with ^^^ it dont take much salt brine to make it tender. Don't forget to foil the wings!
post #7 of 15
i actually use 1/2 and and 1/2 rub for my brine, then rinse and rub with olive oil and more rub.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
just being curious why do i need to brine, if i was bakeing i wouldn't brine would i, so why brine while cooking on a drum. may seem like a silly question but i never heard of someone brineing a chicken, gamehen or turkey before bakeing which is kinda what a drum does.

just asking i'll brine but seems like a extra step for a drum which will cook as well as a oven.
post #9 of 15
tader, brining is a technique that through osmosis brings moisture into the bird and at the same time allows salt/seasoning to penetrate the bird as well. one other thing, the salt also helps to retain the moisture durring the cooking process. some don't and some do.........i like to. try it both ways and see what you prefer.
post #10 of 15
Try the brine, cooking is all about trying this and that, smoking takes it a bit farther! PDT_Armataz_01_12.gif
post #11 of 15
tader, let me be clear about this.....you do not need to brine. if it is something that you normally don't do or are uncomfortable doing then don't. if you like your birds the way you normaly do them then only brine as an experiment. alot of people use too much salt or brine for too long and then don't like brining at all. i use 1/2 the salt most recipes call for and i never brine over night.......but that is MY preference. now go find yours and if you have any questions just ask........there are a lot of good ideas on this site.
post #12 of 15
I brine my turkey before I bake it every year for thanksgiving. Might have to smoke a whole bird one of these years......
post #13 of 15
What toad said - I started with brining turkeys before roasting. What a difference. Now brine chickens, pork chops (especially thick ones that have to cook a long time to be safe), and other stuff.

Try it. if you don't like it, don't do it, But IMHO it adds moisture and juciness.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice guys. i'll brine for a hour and see how i like it. plus i wanna take a picture of them in the hot tub like cowgirl did.PDT_Armataz_01_34.gif
post #15 of 15
Yea what the chef guy said. I always try to brine my birds but sometimes I don't have the time. Now I would brine usually then smoke them for how ever long it takes to get ot 165 in the breast so. I usually keep the smoker at about 275-300 for all my poultry so to crisp the skin too.
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