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Making Lox a picture guide. - Page 7

post #121 of 135

dstar, morning....  I guess I neglected to mention to layer the fish with the onions...  that keeps a pathway for the brine to wiggle through the pieces...    It's not too late to do that.....     

 

Sorry.....

 

Dave

post #122 of 135

Ah, ok.  I thought you were using the onions to help keep the fish submerged.

post #123 of 135
New to the forum, and this is terrific! Thank you for sharing such great knowledge
post #124 of 135

Cold smoked the Salmon yesterday morning for 4 hours and served some at a dinner party last night on freshly made mini bagels with cream cheese and onion...big hit.  This recipe/process is awesome.

 

Nate

post #125 of 135

Excellent.....   Looks awesome.....  I'd for sure eat it....   all of it.....   

 

Dave

post #126 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post


I wrap the fish is saran, freeze solid, then vac pack.... Be sure to cut open the vac-bag before you thaw the fish, or the fish will be crushed...


Very good point, never thought about that Dave. I'll try to remember that even f my memory fails me. Thanks.

HT

post #127 of 135

Pro Tip: Porosity; all meats have porosity, for consistant products we like to know that the porosity is the same everytime. So I always brine my salmon fillets in ice cold salt water for 30 minutes to insure I start with the same porosity every time. Fail to do so at your own peril! (one gallon warm water, stir in all the salt it will take, (til salt lay on the bottom) and then ice it down to 32 F)

Zest an orange and a lemon and reserve the zest.
Dredge the salmon through the mixture. Spread half of the remaining cured mixture on the area where the salmon fillets will lay. Then spread half the orange and lemon zest under the area you will place the salmon. Now lay the fillets flat in a plastic box on top of the zested cure area. After fillet placement spread the remaining mixture over the salmon evenly, then use the remaining zest to coat the top of the fillets.

 

I have a few questions about this recipe. 

1. about how much salt is needed in the 1 gallon or warm water to cold the salmon in? 

2. does the zest from the orange and lemon give it a citrusy flavor? What would I lose if i don't do this or is this necessary?

post #128 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakester View Post
 

Pro Tip: Porosity; all meats have porosity, for consistant products we like to know that the porosity is the same everytime. So I always brine my salmon fillets in ice cold salt water for 30 minutes to insure I start with the same porosity every time. Fail to do so at your own peril! (one gallon warm water, stir in all the salt it will take, (til salt lay on the bottom) and then ice it down to 32 F)

Zest an orange and a lemon and reserve the zest.
Dredge the salmon through the mixture. Spread half of the remaining cured mixture on the area where the salmon fillets will lay. Then spread half the orange and lemon zest under the area you will place the salmon. Now lay the fillets flat in a plastic box on top of the zested cure area. After fillet placement spread the remaining mixture over the salmon evenly, then use the remaining zest to coat the top of the fillets.

 

I have a few questions about this recipe. 

1. about how much salt is needed in the 1 gallon or warm water to cold the salmon in? 

2. does the zest from the orange and lemon give it a citrusy flavor? What would I lose if i don't do this or is this necessary?

I answered this in my lox thread.

 

Al

post #129 of 135

Just came upon this article, sounds like cold smoking is more dangerous than what most people think. 

 

http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/cold_smoking.html

post #130 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakester View Post
 

Just came upon this article, sounds like cold smoking is more dangerous than what most people think. 

 

http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/cold_smoking.html

 

Jakester, morning....  Don't believe everything Meathead puts in print...

post #131 of 135

Good Morning Dave! (afternoon here in PA) I just posted the article to remind everyone to be extremely careful with cured / smoked meats. I know a lot of people don't believe in using cure #1 and i was debating about it too but after reading the article i will be using cure #1 for sure. 

 

Another thing to remind people is to be careful where you get your salmon from and how it is handled. 

post #132 of 135

Your right about folks not understanding the necessity of using nitrites...   take the time to read the ingredients on vac packed meats at the market... they all have nitrite listed as the last ingredient...

 

Meathead could have explained the necessity for using cure #1 without the scare tactics...    I cold smoke stuff below 70 deg. F .. cure #1 is a must have.....

 

I add cure #1 to ALL fish I smoke...  I learned that here....   for years that never happened...  Just lucky I guess...  I hate trusting my life and loved ones lives to luck...    Reason being, I never smoke fish in a smoker above 160....  the meat is too delicate and can be overcooked so easy... 

post #133 of 135

hot smoked salmon is good but cold smoked salmon is amazing, I could eat it all day, everyday. 

post #134 of 135

One of our local supermarkets has a special this week for Alaskan Wild Sockeye Salmon fresh, never frozen for $9.99 a pound. I thought about buying some and cold smoking it but I am thinking previously frozen Salmon is probably a lot safer for cold smoking, right?

post #135 of 135

I am hoping to do some nova lox in the not too distant future.

 

With regard to the brining / curing process (air + weight vs. foodsaver vacuum bag), is there a consensus on the "best way"? All other things being equal, I would prefer to use a vacuum bag because of limited fridge space. I noticed that threemuch indicated that he liked the texture of the air brined better -- does anyone else have opinions about this?

 

I would prefer the end product to be relatively firm -- neither mushy nor flaky -- something that can be sliced paper thin and still hold together...

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