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mesquite in a UDS?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Anybody here have any experience with using mesquite in a UDS? I see everybody using apple, hickory, pecan and whatnot, but don't remember any mention of mesquite.

I've found one know-it-all on another site talking about how mesquite is too strong to allow to smolder in a drum. Other than that, I don't come across any mention of mesquite in a UDS.

Anybody have any input on this?

post #2 of 12
I've used it in a UDS and thought it embarked a very strong flavor to the meat. I'm not a huge fan of it for that reason but there's a lot of folks that love it.

Give it a try, ya might like it.
post #3 of 12
I only use it for high heat grilling on steaks, chicken and weiners, no lid involved. icon_mrgreen.gif Yes it is a strong wood, thats why I dont use a lid.
post #4 of 12
with it being so strong, could you just use a little of it for just the begining?
post #5 of 12
I've used Lazzari mesquite lump in the UDS but not chunks. It was a little strong for my tastes but I prefer a pretty light smoke.

If you think you might like it, give it a try.

post #6 of 12
or what about using ono lump fo the burn..........
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
I think I'll try a small chunk of mesquite mixed in with some apple on my next brisket in the drum. Haven't had a mistake I couldn't eat yet... Will let you know how it comes out.
post #8 of 12
Mesquite is one of my favorite type of wood because it gives meat a good
smoke flavor, It is important to use dried wood,
because if the wood is too green, it can make the
meat taste bitter.
on another note it burns hot. and can and has set my grill on fire from the heat if not carefull. it should work just fine in your UDS.
in some places the mesquite does not get very large as in some parts of texas where it get to be a tree. other areas a shrub and people use roots they gather in construction areas where the bush has been plowed out. I think the roots are rather nasty and should be avoided for use in smoking.
post #9 of 12
I also think it's too strong a wood. Pecan and apple are my faves.

Addendum: I've seen many posts in more than 4 or 5 forums that mesquite is one of the strongest woods when used as a "flavor" wood, and extremely easy to "oversmoke" with. I remember an article--although I don't remember from where--giving the scientific explanation for that--what chemical characteristic causes the good flavors vs. the creosote, and mesquite topped the creosote list by a large margin.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

I stumbled across a workable way to use mesquite in a drum.  One of my coworkers gave me a bag of mesquite chips somebody had given her.  She was happy to share, so I didn't tell her I don't use chips.  After moving the bag a few times to get it out of the way, it occurred to me that maybe the small amount of wood involved might keep it from being overpowering, and the smoldering fire would allow the wood to smoke, not just burn.


I just mixed a bunch of the chips in with the lump in my basket and lit it as usual.  I was very happy with the results.  I never noticed the overwhelming odor of too much mesquite, and the brisket was great! I have oversmoked with mesquite before, and don't want to have that experience again.  The chips worked out great.  The smoke flavor was there, but not overwhelming.  


If I happen on mesquite chips on sale, I'll grab some.  Give it a try if you've got a drum.  The best of both worlds--mesquite flavoring and the hands-off operation of the drum.  Perfect combination, in my book.

post #11 of 12

After seing this post again I have been using a small amount in various smoke jobs. I have seen the TBS!

post #12 of 12

I have been using 3 small chunks in the begining of a 9 hour smoke and thought the results were favorable.

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