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Fine brine

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Had Thanksgiving dinner with one of my cousins and her family yesterday and had the best turkey I've ever tasted.

It was cooked by her son-in-law, a graduate of the Cordon Bleu culinary arts school in Atlanta who now teaches there after some time as a chef at various area restaurants.

The secret, he said, was the brine, and the key to his brine is something I've never heard of before: in place of water, he uses a mixture of beef and chicken stock. The beef stock is the essential ingredient, he said.

I've got to try it because it was the juciest, most flavorful bird I've ever tasted. First time I ever ate Turkey without even a sprinkle of salt/pepper. Just didn't need it.

He said he learned about using stock in a brine from a chef in South Carolina. They use it on pork roasts, too.

Give it a shot some time because it is seriously good.
post #2 of 13
Thanks for sharing...I shall try this next yearPDT_Armataz_01_37.gif
post #3 of 13
The idea is great, just need to make sure when substituting it for water in a brine recipe to cut back on the amt of kosher salt added and, rinse the meat well when taking it from the brine, to the smoker.
post #4 of 13
Very good advice. Your average stock is heavy on sodium.

I don't understand using beef broth on a turkey. You can make a very good broth with poultry, celery, onion, carrots, garlic and S&P.

Any good brine will dissuade you from using salt and pepper. Our bird came out so juicy and flavorful, I was tempted to not use gravy, but temptation won out that battle.
post #5 of 13
I'm with racey with this one I'm not really understanding why you would use a beef stock. Now we make our own stocks from chicken and even turkey to use in differant recipes on some of the side we also fix with the bird. The bbef stock to me would add a really different flovor but maybe it's good I'm just a backyard heater upper.
post #6 of 13
Next Year??? Jerod, turkey is a year-round meat, buddy! Give it a try....nothing better than smoked turkey sandwiches at work, or home-made turkey salad in the summertime. Stock up now the 23-to-37 cents-a-pound birds during the holiday's for year around smokin' goodness.
post #7 of 13
For those asking "Why?" use beef stock instead of just a poultry stock. It adds another level of flavor. If you brine in a poultry stock, you're not really adding anything the doesn't turkey already have.

Sounds to me like the guys is a trained chef. I'd trust him. Might have to try this out on some chicken leg quarters.
post #8 of 13
Sounds good, gonna try it when my leftovers are gone.
post #9 of 13
LOL, I'll have to start using chicken stock on my beef then. :)
post #10 of 13
I think juniper berries were the buzzwords here last year. Whatever happened with that? I ordered a pound and they didn't arrive in time for Thanksgiving last year, and this year I forgot all about them anyway! I did buy a little pack of them last year and brined a bone-in breast and thought it came out really great last year.

This year I used a boneless breast, skipped the brining, marinated with soy sauce and a little bit of Chiavetta's marinade and used the vacuum type ziploc to suck all the air out, put in fridge overnight, and it may have been the best yet. At 162 it was juicy inside but no pink, just solid white. The outside 1/16th inch was almost dry, sealing in the juices.
post #11 of 13

just a newbie

I'm just a newbie with very little experience. I will take all the advice I an get.
Beef broth on a bird Hell it couldn't hurt. I love Beef and I love turkey together might be a little slice of heaven. I suggest juicing some bacon and using it as a marinade AMAZING!!!! J?KPDT_Armataz_01_34.gif
post #12 of 13
PDT_Armataz_01_36.gifwhat would i use vegtable stock for????PDT_Armataz_01_06.gif
post #13 of 13
I believe you are correct sir. We always added beef stock to our chicken noodle soup that we made in a restaurant where I cut my teeth. The chicken soup was one of our number one sellers. I think it was somthing like 3 to 1 chicken to beef stock. It adds a depth of flavor.
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