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18.95 ib turkey cook at 350 or 250

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have smoked a bunch of tri-tip and it came out perfect.Iwas woundering does poultry take in the smoke past temp of 140 ?Cause I thought the tri tip stopped taking in smoke flavor at 140.And there is a danger keeping the bird at 140 or less for a long time? how long and why is it dangerous?thought as long as I get the bird to the final temp which is 250 it should be fine uh?What temp should I cook at 250 or 300 or 350 for a 18.95IB bird?And about how long should it take? Also if I cook two birds in the same smoker is it the same amount of time if they way the same?If anyone can answer my questions thanks for your time.
post #2 of 15
More than one bird will take you about the same amount of time as doing only one.
You want to go with the higher temps on poultry so 325-350 is good.
The meat will take in smoke as long as you let it so you need to monitor how much smoke and what kind you are using on the meat.
As always go with temp not time, but at good temps you should run approximately 3-4 hours.
If you smoke at 250 the skin will not crisp up and will be rubbery.
post #3 of 15
I add my smoke at beggining on poultry...2-3 small chunks.I cook at 320 degrees plus,because i am making the rest of meal and dont have time to putter with the turkey day...

Poultry takes in a fine amount of smoke quick,but the magic is in the gravy from the drippings.Really holds the flavor...

14-15 minutes a pound at 325 degree and check the thigh for 170 degree internal-

A touch of smoke makes a fine bird....
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

gravy drippings

gravy from the drippings where do I learn how to do that?that sounds delicous.Also I am going to smoke today and thanksgiving is on thursday.So I smoke it tell its done.Then go see the inlaws 4 hours away and it will still be good if I reheat it a day later?
post #5 of 15
Both of these guys sent you down the right path for sure. And yes they are that good. I'm hoping to be as good as them soon. I smoke my turkey and all poultry at a higher temp about 300-330 for the skin to crisp up. But also like alex said about 40-45 alb should be a good referance time. Now I haven't made the gravey but it does sound really good too.
post #6 of 15
You have been given some great advice. Follow the instructions given above and your bird should come out perfectly. If the bird is prepared properly there should be no problem with re-heating and serving a day later.

Good luck, John
post #7 of 15
I saw on one site to heat the bird in the oven to 140 to bypass the bacteria stage and then put inside a hot smoker and smoke at 250 until it reaches 170 this way you can cook really large turkeys in a smoker without the risk of bacteria.

Does this sound like it could work?
post #8 of 15
Sounds like it could work.You could also smoke couple hours and put in a hot oven....Lots of folk smoke then fry turkeys....
post #9 of 15
Lots of good advice above.. a few key things..

1. Meat doesn't stopping smoke at 140, the process that causes the smoke ring does stop around that temp, but your meat will continue to take on flavor as long as you apply smoke. Good smoke please.. you don't need to be able to see the smoke to taste it. Creosote is not good BBQ.

2. When smoking any poultry, always go for a higher temperature. Lo and Slo applies to tough pieces of meat with lots of connective tissue to break down. Birds start off tender, so no need to take it slow. You can smoke them at the same temperature you would roast them in the oven.

3. Absolutely no problem transporting are reheating a bird.. the key is to get it thru the danger zone as quickly as possible both when cooling and reheating. The 40-140 degree zone is where the nasties thrive. So, if you plan on eating it the next day, cool it as soon as possible after cooking. don't let it sit on the counter cooling for couple of hours, then decide to chill it. Get that little guy chilled a fast as you can, and keep it below 40 degrees right up until you reheat for dinner.

4. Smaller birds are better/safer for smoking... but then they are better for roasting or frying as well. A big 20 lb bird may look impressive, but a couple of smaller birds will have a better texture and be easier to deal with.

5. If you are considering smoking any sort of bird, brine, brine, brine. Even a simple brine with water, sugar, and salt will make a huge difference with any type of feathered friend.
post #10 of 15
I smoke mine at 350° in order to get beyond the danger zone ASAP. Once internal temp hits 140°. l sometimes will back it down.
post #11 of 15
That's a great piece of advice. I'll have to give that a try, especially if the kitchen experiences delays.
post #12 of 15
About how long does it usually take per pound at 350'?

In this thread, I've seen anywhere from 15-45 minutes per pound...pretty big difference for planning!
post #13 of 15
That was a typo......I use 14-15 minutes per pound on my stuffed birds.Less if not stuffed....At 350 degree this is when i start checking the thigh for internal....Usually very close approximation if you are 350 degree...
post #14 of 15
Just wondering because mballi3011 mentioned 40-45 minutes per pound. 15 minutes makes more sense, but I don't want to start it 5 hours before dinner and then it takes 9 hours instead.
post #15 of 15
I would suggest a web search then to verify if you are still not sure....It is a pretty common formula..Been using it myself for years,but it is good to double check.....
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