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maple wood - Page 2

post #21 of 37
Thread Starter 
Thanks erain,I will check the leaves out in the morning,if any are left!Bite your tongue meat hunter,lol.I can always wait for winter.I need to meve south but family is up here.
post #22 of 37
LOL. I know what you mean about the extra clothes. When I'll all dressed up on the cold days, I look like the Michelin Man.
post #23 of 37
Thread Starter 
Well I took erains advice and these are silver maples I have.I also found a site that shows leaf descriptions of the different species.Still good to use though huh?
post #24 of 37
Can you share the site? I always wondered how to tell the different types of maples apart myself.

Thanks!
post #25 of 37
Thread Starter 
Not a problen Toxie.Here is the link.

http://www.waterfordva-wca.org/natur...ees-maples.htm
post #26 of 37
Thanks jlmacc!! I appreciate that. PDT_Armataz_01_34.gif
post #27 of 37

I routinely use maple twigs and branches from our yard to smoke food on the grill and sausage in our smoker. It always works great!

post #28 of 37

Is there a difference between the maple wood sold and sugar maple???  My son-in-law say's sugar maple is the best.

post #29 of 37

I make syrup from maple sap. My maples are all Red Maple, but all of the maples are used for maple syrup, including box elder (Manitoba Maple), Norway Maple, and Big Leaf Maple. Many people claim they can taste the difference, but many others claim they can't. That tells me that all of the maples will have very similar smoke.

post #30 of 37

Thanks for the information, that helps me a lot.

post #31 of 37
I work at a bbq restuarant i buy some of our cherry wood 20$at a time and i trimmed some red oak logs about thay we re 6 feet long. Tree trimming company comes along and starts trimming like crazy gots oaks sugar maples and some birch. Mostly sugar maple. Cut the sugar maple into cubes and all my cuts are around 2-10inches.[IMG]
post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cedar Eater View Post

I make syrup from maple sap. My maples are all Red Maple, but all of the maples are used for maple syrup, including box elder (Manitoba Maple), Norway Maple, and Big Leaf Maple. Many people claim they can taste the difference, but many others claim they can't. That tells me that all of the maples will have very similar smoke.

I live in Manitoba and I'd like to cut every Manitoba Maple down! It's an absolute weed. If I'd known it was good for smoking I would have salvaged some of the branches that were trimmed from the tree near the power lines in my neighbour's yard. I've played with a little of it in my wood shop teaching days and found it soft and smelly when worked on saws and planers.
post #33 of 37
I live a few blocks down from a rather large custom cabinet shop. The closest building is their door shop and they allow people to come by with a pickup truck and take their scraps provided you are prepared to take the entire bin and not sort through the wood. The most popular wood for cabinet faces is rock maple with a little oak, cherry, alder and walnut thrown in. Most of the scraps are 2-3 inches wide and 3/4 inch thick with random lengths. I'm anticipating that this would be ideal for a stick burner.
post #34 of 37

Thanks for the info people! My landlord is about to down a huge Maple in my backyard and I was wondering if I could use this to cook. 

post #35 of 37
I know this is old thread but for what it's worth my two cents Silver Maple I don't believe is considered a hardwood.
post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Browndirt View Post

I know this is old thread but for what it's worth my two cents Silver Maple I don't believe is considered a hardwood.

 

Ah, but it is, it is. So is poplar which is softer than most soft woods. Just because it's not as dense as oak doesn't mean it's not a "hardwood" tree.

post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Browndirt View Post

I know this is old thread but for what it's worth my two cents Silver Maple I don't believe is considered a hardwood.

 

http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-identification/hardwoods/silver-maple/

 

For the most part, if it is deciduous (sheds leaves in the fall) it is a hardwood tree. If it has needles, it is a softwood tree. There are exceptions, but they aren't maples. Amercan Larch is a hard softwood that sheds its needles in the fall. It is not an evergreen. Northern White Cedar is an evergreen, but it doesn't have needles. It is a softwood.

 

Red and silver maples are called "soft maple" to distinguish their lumber type from sugar and black maples which are called "hard maple".

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