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post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
So I grew a bunch of these, well not really alot but about enough for a meal. What do I need to do to them or can I just cook and eat. I'm gonna grow a bunch next year so any ideas for what to do when I have alot would be helpful
post #2 of 17
In the South we call 'em Black Eyed Peas, and no matter what you call 'em they're good.

Here's my long-time recipe for them buying them in a bag, dried. Reduce cooking time a lot if they are fresh, but the idea is still the same.

Good Southern food here....

Rivet's Black Eyed Peas

1 LB bag dry black eyed peas
1 LB Chub Country Sausage (NOT maple flavored)
1 LB bacon cut into 2 inch pieces
2 smoked ham hocks (the kind you get at the cured meats cooler at wally world or the grocery)

1 28oz Can Crushed tomatoes
1 Very Large white onion, diced
1 Bunch Parsley, chopped
3 or 4 Chicken Boullion cubes
1 Cup Blackstrap molasses
1 TBSP fresh ground pepper
1 TBSP Oregano
1 TBSP Basil
1 TBSP Sweet Paprika
Olive oil/bacon grease/butter

Soak the peas 24 hrs in a large stockpot, changing the water a couple times. You can also do them overnight (8 hrs) and just drain and rinse them in a colander the next morning. I’ve done them both ways. No worries.

In a large stockpot, heat a splash of olive oil, or bacon grease, or butter and drop in the sausage if using it. With a wooden spoon, break it up and brown over medium heat. (Purnell’s Whole Hog sausage is so lean, you need the oil or drippings. It will burn otherwise, as it releases no fat). About halfway through cooking it, add the diced onion and continue cooking.

If using bacon, omit oil and follow above. If using smoked ham hocks, just plop them in when you get all ingredients in pot.

Once onions are translucent and meat is almost all cooked, add the paprika and mix well.

Add the can of diced tomatoes, parsley, oregano, basil, pepper, boullion cubes and mix well.

Add water until peas are covered over with one inch of water. Here’s where you’d add the smoked hocks if you are using them, and molasses.

Bring to boil, then reduce heat and simmer gently 3-4 hrs, UNCOVERED. You want some water to boil away-you’re not making soup. If it boils off below the level of the peas during cooking, add some more. You want liquid just at the surface once it is done.

Adjust for salt. If using country ham or smoked hocks, it is plenty salty enough.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
thanks Rivet,PDT_Armataz_01_37.gifI just got done shelling most of them and I got about 2 cups of them. I have ate bunchs of them as most of my family is from N.C. just never grew them and cooked my self.

i planted about a 6 ft row this year and plan to do alot more next year as they grew really well.

thanks for the recipie and the side infopoints.gif
post #4 of 17
What rivet said.Also when cowpeas are young-before they make beans in pod-try some like a steamed green bean-wonderful flavor....
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
i let mine go till they were almost dry since i read to do that somewhere.

if i grow alot more next year any ideas on how to store them
post #6 of 17

cow peas

Cowpeas just like any other pea freezes well just remove peas from pod and bag up in freezer bags and freeze.
They also freeze well after cooking.
post #7 of 17
I didn't know what they were until you said black eyed peas, I had no clue they were known by another name. Now I know, and thanks for the recipe John, my Mother loves them so I'm going to give it a try.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Do they have to be dried out first, and if so is there any special way? The ones I just did are pretty dry and I put them in a paper bag. We probobly won't make for awhile so maybe i should vacum seal till we are ready
post #9 of 17
Had to delete my post.I do hate cowpeas though.............
post #10 of 17
What he said...
post #11 of 17

black eyed peas

no you dont have to dry first. I buy alot of fresh vegetables from our local market that have just been put in plastic bags tied w/ twist tie and frozen.
just dont want any water on them to make ice crystals.
post #12 of 17
Storing dry beans is simple.The pod or plant will yellow and then open a pod and beans should be dry,not soft or anything.....watch the pods since years like mine with lotta rain they can rot in pods if you let them go to long

I vac-u-seal so they last years.....

My neighbor cans fresh string beans in a vinegar solution for .Very crispy winter snack...

I only grew 5 variety and 160 linear feet this year....Some of beans in june.........

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
i got them vacum sealed for later next month. i'm gonna grow more next year as they were real easy to grow and easy to store
post #14 of 17
Yeah-Man.One of the best simple proteins/carbs that you can grow.Beans also fix nitrogen from air-LEGUMES- so i cut off stems at ground and till in the root zone below ground......One of the most beneficial plants for humans and soil.......The roots fix nitrogen-i.e. add natural nitrogen to soil....

Rock on Brother..........PDT_Armataz_01_37.gif
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
What kinda beans are those in your picture? The ones that say cranberry look like they did pretty good.
post #16 of 17
Cranberry beans are a VERY old variety that my mom-still living-Whoes Father- was the best farmer/grocer owner/butcher/everything man I ever New.....You can find them-i think online-i use the dry beans from year before and plant those .........Meyers seed out of baltimore-believe it or not-100 year old seed company -carries them as well....The best stew bean period in my mind,but these things are subjective....I grow black,red,etc beans...................Love beans since i am a non-fast food kinda guy................

If you can not get em from meyers P.M. me-i will get you some if you are serious about dem beans-i am.........I can get them from mr. meyers in spring.........Dirt cheap.....
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'll look around locally or online for them, if i can't find anything i'll give ya a shout. thanks for the info
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