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Evolution of a Memphis Rib Method

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
This is the original from the BBQFAQ and is enough for two slabs of spare ribs:

Memphis Hogaholics Award-Winning Dry Rub for Ribs

· 1 Tbsp. lemon peel
· 1 Tbsp. garlic powder
· 1 Tbsp. onion powder
· 1 Tbsp. chili powder
· 1 Tbsp. paprika
· 1 Tbsp. MSG
· 1/2 Tbsp. black pepper
· 1/2 Tbsp. white pepper
· 1/2 Tbsp. cayenne pepper
· 2 Tbsp. salt
· 2 Tbsp. sugar

Mix together.

Memphis Hogaholics Award-Winning Basting Sauce for Ribs

· 1 quart vinegar
· 1 pint water
· 1/2 small can chili peppers
· 1 cup prepared mustard
· 1-1/4 cup brown sugar
· 1/2 stick butter
· 1/2 bottle root beer

Combine first four ingredients in a saucepan and mix well. Cook very slowly for 1 hour. Add sugar, butter, and root beer to mixture and slow boil for 30 minutes.

Memphis Hogaholics Award-Winning Wet Finishing Sauce for Ribs

· 5 oz. dark soy sauce
· 5 oz. Worcestershire sauce
· 12 oz. catsup
· 24 oz. tomato juice
· 1 cup apple cider vinegar
· 1 cup brown sugar
· Juice of 1 lemon
· 1 tsp. red pepper
· 1 tsp. black pepper
· 1 tsp. dry mustard
· 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
· 1/2 tsp. onion powder
· 1/2 tsp. oregano
· 1/2 tsp. allspice
· 1/2 tsp. ginger
· 1/2 tsp. basil

Mix all ingredients in a saucepan and simmer for 1 hour. Let sauce stand for 2 hours before serving on the side with barbecue.


This is what I did:

Ron’s adaptation of Memphis Hogaholics Award-Winning Dry Rub for Ribs

· 1 Tbsp. dried lemon zest
· 1 Tbsp. granulated garlic
· 1 Tbsp. onion powder
· 1 Tbsp. chili powder
· 1 Tbsp. paprika
· 1/2 Tbsp cumin
· 1/2 Tbsp dry mustard powder
· 1/2 Tbsp. black pepper
· 1/2 Tbsp. white pepper
· 1/2 Tbsp. cayenne pepper
· 2 Tbsp. kosher salt
· 4 Tbsp. turbinado sugar

Mix together; slather prepared mustard on ribs, then apply rub. Cover and set ribs in fridge overnight.

Ron’s adaptation of Memphis Hogaholics Award-Winning Basting Sauce for Ribs

· 1 quart apple cider vinegar
· 1 can (12 oz.) beer
· 1/2 cup (4 oz.) prepared lemon-lime kool-aid
· 1 cup prepared mustard
· 1-1/4 cup dark brown sugar
· stick unsalted butter
· 1 can A&W root beer

Combine first four ingredients in a saucepan and mix well. Cook very slowly for 1 hour. Add sugar, butter, and root beer to mixture and slow boil for 30 minutes. After the ribs have been on the smoker for at least an hour-and-a-half, generously apply baste once every hour to both sides.

Ron’s adaptation of Memphis Hogaholics Award-Winning Wet Finishing Sauce for Ribs

· 5 oz. low-sodium soy sauce
· 5 oz. Worcestershire sauce
· 12 oz. catsup
· 24 oz. tomato juice
· 1 cup apple cider vinegar
· 1 cup dark brown sugar
· Juice of 1 lemon
· 1 tsp. white pepper
· 1 tsp. dry mustard powder
· 1/2 tsp. granulated garlic
· 1/2 tsp. onion powder
· 1/2 tsp. oregano
· 1/2 tsp. allspice
· 1/2 tsp. ginger
· 1/2 tsp. basil

Mix all ingredients in a saucepan and simmer for 1 hour. Let sauce stand for 2 hours before serving on the side with barbecue. Optionally, you can also brush sauce on ribs as they come off the smoker.


This is what I will do next time:

Ron’s Memphis-style Dry Rub for Ribs

· 1 Tbsp. dried lemon zest
· 1 Tbsp. granulated garlic
· 1 Tbsp. onion powder
· 1 Tbsp. chili powder
· 1 Tbsp Worcestershire powder (Worcestershire pepper if powder is unavailable)
· 2 Tbsp. paprika
· 2 Tbsp.kosher salt
· 4 Tbsp. Turbinado sugar

Mix together; slather prepared mustard on ribs, then apply rub. Cover and set ribs in fridge overnight.

Ron’s Memphis-style Basting Sauce for Ribs

· 3 cups apple cider vinegar
· 2 cups beer or lemonade
· 1 cup prepared mustard
· 1-1/4 cup dark brown sugar
· 1 /2 cup oilive oil
· 1 can A&W root beer

Combine first four ingredients in a saucepan and mix well. Cook very slowly for 1 hour. Add sugar, butter, and root beer to mixture and slow boil for 30 minutes. After the ribs have been on the smoker for at least an hour-and-a-half, generously apply baste once every hour to both sides.

Ron’s Memphis-style Finishing Sauce for Ribs

· 5 oz. low-sodium soy sauce
· 5 oz. Worcestershire sauce
· 12 oz. catsup
· 24 oz. tomato juice
· 1 cup apple cider vinegar
· 1 cup dark brown sugar
· Juice of 1 lemon
· 1 tsp. white pepper
· 1 tsp. dry mustard
· 1/2 tsp. granulated garlic
· 1/2 tsp. onion powder
· 1/2 tsp. oregano
· 1/2 tsp. basil

Mix all ingredients in a saucepan and simmer for 1 hour. Let sauce stand for 2 hours before serving on the side with ribs. Optionally, you can also brush sauce on ribs as they come off the smoker.
post #2 of 13
Why??... I guess why did you change again and what made you choose the ones you left out??
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
hi, eagle -

my changes from the original were an attempt to improve and clarify a bit (turbinado versus regular sugar and dried lemon zest versus lemon peel in the rub, etc.) and also in an attempt to tone the spiciness down a little as my wife can not in any way do spicy foods.

even with my adaptations, this was very spicy for her so naturally, i will cut out all cayenne and black pepper. the chili powder and white pepper do not seem to affect her as much. also, i remembered (too late) reading that when ginger is cooked it takes on a heat. as far as i can tell, this explains why the sauce was "too spicy" even after i took out anything that appeared to be hot. my "final" changes were an atempt to remove anything approaching "too hot."

hope that explains a bit!
post #4 of 13
RGR that!!

Your right, it is usually the 'too spicy' reaction that makes me leave out the cayenne...dry mustard is suppose to add heat too right?

My usual rub goes something like this:

  • 3/4 cup Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 cup Course Kosher Salt
  • 3/4 cup Paprika, 1/2 of which is the 'smoked paprika' made by Spice Islands
  • 1 1/2 TBS Chili Powder
  • 1 1/2 TBS Garlic Powder
  • 1 1/2 TBS Onion Powder
  • 2 Tsp Ground Cumin
  • 2 TBS Ground Black Pepper


If you want to spice it up a bit and add a 'bite' to the taste then add 1 Tsp Cayenne Red Pepper

I put mine into an empty large Tones spice plastic bottle which shakes out on the meat perfectly IMO.
post #5 of 13
Hey thanks for sharing Tas~ that's some nice recipe. I understand about the heat...Mrs Rivet is not a fan either of ginger either uncooked or cooked, let alone heat.

I wonder about your replacing the butter for olive oil in the basting sauce- any thoughts?

This rub is something I definitely will try next time and leave the finishing sauce on the side to dip into. I was talking to another BBQ fanatic at work and he said whenever he rubs his ribs, he always has the sauce on the side and serves them dry.

Good post, bud!
post #6 of 13
While both my wife and I like a bit of spice we to serve our ribs dry with sauce on the side. Don't know how this would go over in competition but for home that is what we do. My rub is fairly complicated and adds tons of flavor on its own. Being a KC boy originally, that may sound odd. KC BBQ is as much about the sauce as the meat.
post #7 of 13
Do they Have BBQ anyplace other than KANSAS CITY? (Ducking the Rotten Tomatoes)LOLPDT_Armataz_01_12.gifPDT_Armataz_01_12.gifPDT_Armataz_01_12.gif
post #8 of 13
I likeing the looks of those-thanks Ron.
post #9 of 13
What and where is this place you call "Kansas City"? icon_wink.gif
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
>>>dry mustard is suppose to add heat too right<<<

eagle - the mustard doesn't seem to bother her but then again it is commercial dry powdered msutard and therefore pretty bland.

>>>I wonder about your replacing the butter for olive oil in the basting sauce- any thoughts?<<<

rivet -

with the butter i noticed separation and also a bit of clumping. i think that if a person were to go with either half-butter/half/olive oil or all olive oil, it might work better, but then again, there is something about the taste of slowly-browned butter!

i also prefer the dry rib ~ a finsihing sauce is nice but it belongs on the side, or maybe even as a dip for cornbread or topping for mashed potatoes. a good sauce is good, but the ribs ought to be the star. something to keep in mind is tht this basting sauce was brushed on every hour or so and each time it dried/glazed into a very nice outer crust. when i pulled the ribs off, they looked great and i should have gotten a picture!

>>>I likeing the looks of those-thanks Ron.<<<

thanks to you, too! if you give it a try, let me know whether you sued the original or one of thea daptations and also if you can think of any improvements. up til now, i've simply been going with a commerical rub and very simple basting glaze at the end that carmelizes into a nice dry sheen, but for a good rib i am willing to learn a new trick or two.
post #11 of 13
Thanks Tas~
good post and definitely worth a try for a change on chicken.
post #12 of 13
Tas~ You are right, and I'm with you on the memphis ribs. They are meant to be served "dry" and dipped into sauce on the side. Definitely going to do them that way next time. Your expereince and suggestions are much appreciated, bud...thanks! PDT_Armataz_01_34.gif
post #13 of 13
It's home to the "WORLDS BEST BBQ". LOL
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