or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:


post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
How long should I smoke corn on the cob? Temp will be 225
post #2 of 17
About 90 minutes to two hours. I buttered and sprinkled with rub and then my wife insisted on wrapping it with foil instead of just the husk. It was still good, just no smoke flavor.
post #3 of 17


peel the husk back and remove all the silks. melt some butter and mix a lil evoo. brush this on ears and season w/ your favorite . pull the husk back over the corn and smoke . i just smoke mine till its tender.
post #4 of 17
I just did some all White Corn, husked it and in the smoke without any rubbing or oiling at all. It took 90 minutes at 230f in a Cherry and pecan 1/2 & 1/2 smoke. Delicious. When the kernels start to wrinkle a bit the corn is done.

Even my sister said she liked it. And at 65 years old she is still a big stinky Meany who will seldom admit to likeing anything her brother (me) does.
post #5 of 17
Soak in ice cold water for an hr or so. Peel the husk back and remove all the silk. Melt some butter and add a little prepared horseradish and parsley, brush this on ears. Pull the husk back over the corn and smoke 230 for an hr to hr and a half. Till tender.
post #6 of 17
You could even soak it in sugar water.
I tried that just recently and it was really good, next time I'm going to try soaking in a spicy garlicy concoction and see how well it traps in the flavors.
post #7 of 17
FiU, today I used you rearlier suggestion and soaked a couple corn ears in the husk in sugar water. About 1/2 cup in a gallon or so. Put the two ears on the smoker with the ribs for about an hour and a half at 250F.

They were fantastic! My kids wanted a couple more, but there were none to have. We appreciate your idea and will do this often- it's great!!
post #8 of 17


along w/ sugar in your soak, If ya like spicy add a couple tblsp. liquid crab boil.
If the kids like corn you can just boil it in water w/ sugar and a touch of crab boil . I like this for a snack LOL
post #9 of 17
Did this for the first time last night. Actually the first night for my Weber Performer (charcoal bowl grill) too. Put marinated steaks over the charcoal baskets, and corn around the perimeter (indirect heat). My wife peeled back the husks, removed the silk, pulled the husks back up and put them in a big bowl of water to soak. No sugar added, but it was peaches n' cream corn, which is very sweet all on its own. They were on for about 25min at 300-350F, 30min would have been perfect. Not that much smoke flavor, but I wasn't really shooting for that, more of a fun way to cook corn on the cob rather than boiling it. And it was good.

Now that I've read some of the great ideas here however, tonight may be another story.
post #10 of 17
I did some last week, just your basic pull the husk back, butter and salt and tie the ends shut with strips of husk and smoke. I did not know how many layers of husk to remove so I took all but the ones that actually contact the cob off. Turned out great, about 2 hours on the smoker. I love your idea of the horseradish and parsley, man does that sound good. MMMmmmm
post #11 of 17
Try mayo, chili powder, parm cheese, salt and pepper.
post #12 of 17
I'm running with Rivet, Eman, and Fire soak it in ( I would use spicey) liquid for alittle while and put some butter and Evoo then pull the husk back over it and smoke it for 1 to 1- 1/2 then enjoy PDT_Armataz_01_34.gif
post #13 of 17


About two hours.....
Clean off the silk,
coat the entire ear with Mayonaisse(yep,Mayo)
sprinkle with a good rub
cover back up with the shucks
and cook!!! No butter needed and better than it sounds...
TRY AT LEAST ONE!!! You'll love iticon_cool.gif
post #14 of 17
I been soaking in sugar water for a long time-as rest say remove silks-I make a herb butter and add before covering-and smoke till tender-90 mins. of so
post #15 of 17
A couple things now that I found this thread...

I grow my own corn... this way, you can choose the variety & type. There are many that are just not grown commercially, and 99% you won't even find at a roadside stand or farmers market. They are much, much sweeter than the shipped or trucked in Supersweets, not to mention fresher.

Modern corn breeding brings you the best of both worlds--the tenderness of Sugar enhanced types with the sweetness of Supersweets--all on the same ear. Look for "TripleSweet", "synergistic", and "TableSweet" types.

For Triplesweet types, my favorites are Honey Select for a yellow, Avalon for a white, and Serendipity for a bi-color. Honey Select is an All-America Selections Winner (AAS.)

For SuperSweets, my favorite is How Sweet It Is, a white. It produces big ears with blunt rounded tips. Often you get two per plant.

Be sure to read directions on planting, some cannot be planted near others or they will cross-pollinate & the results will be starchy, like field corn or "cow corn."

Always grow corn at least 4 rows wide to get best pollination, unless you want to hand pollinate them. Each silk requires a grain of pollen from the tassles to pollinate and give you a kernel. Improper spacing or # of rows leads to poor pollination, which gives you ears with blank spots on them.

Try eating some triplesweets raw in the garden. Honey Select is so sweet raw you will think it's candy.

To tell when corn is ready, feel for kernel fill and pull back husks slightly to expose kernels; ***** a few kernels with your fingernail and see if liquid is clear or milky. Milky is best ripe. Clear is too soon or too late.

There's no need to soak corn in sugar water if you start with something really sweet in the first place!

As to smoking, today I made a small, leaner ribeye roast and forgot about the corn until an hour or so before the roast was about ready to remove. I went out back and picked a few Bravado triplesweets, (first time growing this one!) pulled the husks back, removed the silks and rolled the cob in room temp butter, then rolled the husks back closed. I placed them on the empty top rack in the smoker.

This was the first time I smoked corn and they came out great! I pulled the roast at about 130 degrees and left the corn and Wicked Beans smoking until I had the roast rested and cut. I pulled the husks open but did not remove them--they added smoke flavor to the senses by smelling them each time the cob was raised to my mouth!

Hope this helps!
post #16 of 17


Oh, ya'll are skeptical of trying the Maoy on your Cornicon_question.gif
Too bad, it's good.icon_cool.gif
post #17 of 17


that's Mayo...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Veggies