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Crab Apple Prunings? Grape vines?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have this crab apple tree... I really want it dead because it's haggard looking, and sheds tons of the most useless ground clutter (crabapples, no good for making booze, no good to me) which attracts yellowjackets in the late summer.
my Mom would probably disown me if I cut it down. Regardless, in any case it needs to look better, and there are some prunes that need to come off (specifically the prune coming out of the ground, IMNSHOwink.gif). Most are under 1.5" in diameter. Alot of that is thin long... prunes. Too small? Also, there are some dead branches toward the top... too dead? I can see some moss, but there's moss growing on some of the livelier parts as well

Also, I have a bunch of grapevines that make grapes that taste like God's wrath and are taking over my neighbors silver maple, and my neigbor isn't that happy... Usage? Dry grapevines seem like they would combust pretty quick.

I'm primarily using charcoal as I experiment with my offset because it's easy. Could I use these prunes/vines? In an aluminum foil bag? I'm guessing the seasoning period would be pretty short which is good because I am ADD incarnate...
post #2 of 12
I found this Posted by Dutch in the Woods For Smoking section:
CRABAPPLE - Similar to apple wood.

GRAPEVINES - Tart. Provides a lot of smoke. Rich and fruity. Good with poultry, red meats, game and lamb.
post #3 of 12
Excellent!!!! Neighbor is cutting down 2 crabapples and asked if I wanted the wood. This thread answered that ? for me. Thanks!
post #4 of 12
If you leave the tree, there is always a usePDT_Armataz_01_12.gif

Ingredients: (for 1 quart)
  • 4 quarts crabapples
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 3 cups vodka

Take a 4 quart mason jar, and fill it with crabapples that have been washed and quartered (you could take the stems and cores out, but it makes no difference and is a lot more work). Add 4 cups of sugar and three cups of vodka. Store the jar on its side, turning once every day for 16 days to get the sugar to dissolve. After 16 days, filter out the fruit bits (you can use a knee-high nylon stocking, as this can be suspended for a few days to get every last drop out), and bottle. This recipe can be done on nearly any scale from 1 qt. to 4qt. (I've never seen a mason jar more than 1 gallon), and two bottles of vodka will normally yield about five bottles of liqueur.

You can also make wine not mention jelly.
aka Rocky
post #5 of 12
Let em season and smoke em up!
post #6 of 12
i've used crab apple trimmings with excellent reuslts - just make sure they are seasoned!
post #7 of 12
That's a great recipe for ANY fruit, and I'd imagine that the resultant vodka liquer would be a nice ingredient in a baste for ribs/a butt, but probably too nice to drink instead. biggrin.gif

I've done this with plums, and with sloe berries (so instead of sloe gin we made sloe vodka). This summer we're going to use the raspberries, black & red currants & possibly some strawberries, all from the garden + wild blackberries with rum to make a rum based fruit liqueur for Xmas - the plan is that the sieved out preserved fruit will go in the Xmas trifle & the rum will go into my Dad & I!!.
post #8 of 12

the fruit

The fruit that has been soaked in the rum is fantastic on vanilla ice cream.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
My mom does this with just about anything ('cept crabapples so far) with fantastic results. Last she did was cranberry/grapefruit/orange. She stashes it away because she knows the family would guzzle it by the mason jar if given half the chance.
post #10 of 12


do you think that this would work with very ripe mangos. Probably would not need sugar. Ive got a ton of mangos in the back yard and have already made chutney and jam.
post #11 of 12
There is a virtual forest of grapevines around the way-back areas of my backyard. They grow over the fence and block the sun from my raspberries, roses and other plants. I trim them brutally- though they always come back- and save the trimmings. The vine is excellent for smoking once it is dried and gives a nice rich aroma to meats even when just grilling hamburgers, hotdogs or steaks.

If you are lucky enough (or cursed enough, depending on ones mood for trimming work) save them. You'll be nicely surprised.
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Absolutely. You might actually want to tone back the sugar if they are that ripe. The only thing I know of that doesn't really taste good is the horrid grapes in my back yard. Carefull, when this stuff's done, it is deceptively easy to drink...
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