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Can thin blue be too thin?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I finally got to season my GOSM and there very little if any smoke to be seen but I could smell it. Not sure what info is needed so heres is all I can think of.

Temp was 225 according to the stock thermometer
Ambient temp around 50
Apple wood
Cast iron smoker box from Walmart
Very light wind

Also if 225 when 50 out guessing gona be too hot when it hits 85-90 out.
post #2 of 13
If you can smell it...... it's flavoring your meat. It is very easy to oversmoke your meat. I think with smoke.... less is better. I'd rather have a tad too little smoke flavor than a tad too much. I've found that I change the taste of my meats with the type of wood instead of the amount of smoke. Each gives me a different flavor. I lean towards hickory and or mesquite. If I'm doing bacon or jerky I may move over to apple or maple. You'll get a feel for this as you go.

225 is 225 regardless of how hot or cold it is outside. Just go by your temp. I'd suggest a seperate therm to watch your internal meat temp and your smoker temp. I've not seen any of the door or lid temp gauges that were accurate and they don't give you the temp on the grate. I use a maverick ET-73.
post #3 of 13
I've never used a GOSM but if it has a way to control air intake, open that sucker up more. My wood smoker quits visibly smoking when I choke the intake too much. That's about the only advice I can offer. I've never even used gas come to think of it. Or maybe your wood box isn't getting hot enough?

post #4 of 13
you will probly still get some smoke flavor, you will know for next time if you should have added some more wood. remeber, you dont what that white thick billowing smoke very long. and i have never ran a gas or electric,only wood burners, so someone else that has used a cooker like yours my reply also.
post #5 of 13
If you are smelling it so can the meat. My GOSM doesn't produce much visible smoke either. I do suggest checking your thermometer tho I haven't heard of anybody with a GOSM that the stock thermo is right
post #6 of 13
What he said. Don't trust the stock thermo.
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
There are no lower vents. Is the stock thero generally low or high? Or is it off but never the same.

Thanks for the replies.
post #8 of 13
Heard of them both ways but never one that was right. Mine is reads about 40* low
post #9 of 13
All the above...agreed.

And, you can calibrate the factory GOSM thermo. I use a fresh calibrated (or checked) turkey fryer therm. Check the fryer therm buy partially submerging the probe in boiling water. Depending on altitude, but mostly the actual barometric pressure, the thermometer should read at or near 212*F (sea level). Higher altitude (lower barometer reading) will result in a slightly lower boiling point of water.

Use that freshly checked fryer therm as a probe for the cabinet, as close to the stock probe as possible, through a door crack, or hold the stock therm rotated 90 degrees off level and insert fryer therm into the line-up pin holes (clips must be removed). With the burner running, take up to a near smoke temp (200 or so) and cross-check the 2 readings. If stock is out of tolerance, let it cool and turn the hex (I don't remember the size, it's SAE, maybe 7/16") on the stem to correspond with the difference in the two readings, then, recheck to make sure you got it right. Advise not to adjust the calibration until temp is cool and stable, or your calibration will not be very accurate.

Mine was off about 60* when it was new. It happens alot, with all stock thermometers, so don't sweat it. Some can't be calibrated. These types with the hex "nut" on the stem of the probe can be adjusted.

Good luck, and may the thin blue be with you!

post #10 of 13
Have to agree you don't have to see it for the smoke to be there. As for the stock therm in the door, mine works great. No issuse so far after 4 or 5 years. Still I always run a extra prob for kicks and giggles. Also It's always garaged when not in use. Not sure if it's chicken soup but it works for me. G L and enjoy wink.gif
post #11 of 13
When I fire up my GOSM, I crank the burner all the way up for about 5 minutes to get the wood chunks smoking good. Then I turn it down to low, which with no wind is usually about 225. I also use a seperate remote probe to monitor my smoker temp. The factory one was accurate for about the first 5 smokes, then it started acting funny. Also if there is a good amount of wind you probably wont see the smoke.
post #12 of 13
i do the same with mine, crank it up on high to get the wood smoking. i usually am runing mine around medium to keep smoker. summertime is below medium amd winter have to run it higher as needed. i also used chunks instead of chips. seem to get more consistant smoke and a couple chunks last alot longer than a whole panful of chips.

stock thermo is there to fill the hole in the door. even if you get it calibrated more than likely will not be accurate across the whole range.

a good didgital thermo with a probe for meat and for smoker box is a great addition to your arsenal of tools. almost a must in my book. either way you will have to expieriment a bit to find sweet spots for temp settings and how much smoke you prefer. good luck!!!
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
I was gonna use my remote thermometer but didn't remember til I was already going. Didn't think the smoker cared if I was off but will remember next time. Hopefully.
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