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Ethnic scraps / Rice and gandules

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Such beautiful pieces of meat I decided to make some of the best food known to hispanic man. This dish is integral to puerto ricans as well as dominicans everywhere. It turns up on every holiday table as well as sunday dinners. The list of ingredients is extensive but each one is neccesary for it to be complete. I thought some of you folks looking to try something different might give this a shot. Its a hell of a one pot dinner as really it contains everything to satisfy the hungriest of people. If the gondules(pigeon peas) are absolutely something you will not try!!! you can sub fresh green peas, just add them when you add the rice instead of in the beginning with the pork. I really do hope you try this.
These are the ingredients, you should be able to judge amounts by the photos otherwise ill specify...Love this QVIEW!! Hope you like pictures.

First season the meat well with olive oil adobo(garlic, cumin and oregano) let it sit while you heat up a heavy pan with a lid ( a paella pan would work or in this case a cast iron with enamel)

After meat is brown one by one ill incorporate all other ingredients into the pan, each one getting its own minute or so by itself to come alive
first some homemade wet cured and heavily smoke pork sirloin(just use ham) followed by cilantro stems, spanish olives, sofrito(peppers,onions, tomatoes and spices ground to a pulp) and recaito(ground cilantro).

Next add 1 can rinsed gandules, 2 cups water, 1 sazon packet, i teaspoon oregano and1/2 a can of tomato sauce. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

after 20 minutes uncover, add 2 cups of rice and another cup of water. ! tablespoon chopped cilantro leaves and simmer on medium until most of the water is absorbed. Turn low and cover for another 20 minutes.

After 20 minutes turn the rice inside and cover for another 10-20.
post #2 of 15
That's quite cool! Might have to give that a go!

Take care, have fun, and do good!


post #3 of 15
Gotta say, it looks tastey!
post #4 of 15
very interesting lookin dish, in a good way . i would like to try that some day
post #5 of 15
Actually, I never heard pf a pigeon pea.. Huh. But man that looks delicious! I love my pork verde, this looks like an improvment!
post #6 of 15
Looks great. Gonna save this one and try it. Thanks.
post #7 of 15
Someone else has also got to be thinking this... What if you pre-smoked the pork, then added it later on in the cook? I know you're relying on that to season the pan, but it could be a nice element.

Looks great! Sounds almost a little like paella, but in the end, not so much. What do you call it?
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Yea, the similarities to paella are unescapable. And then the similarities to jumbalaya are also noticeable. I think its the effct the spanish had on regional food as they raped their way across the new continent. But the variation come regionally by french and african influences. Puerto rican food is heavily african influenced where as in jumbalaya has african as well as french influences. But all in all its just your basic one pot rice dish. And though arrozz con pollo is cooked in a similar way, I think the timing of the harvest of pigeon peas led to the creation of this dish as more of a special occasion when families where together and would shuck the peas together.

As far a presmoking the pork, it is my opinion that if you want presmoked pork, add that in as well but not in lieu of the raw pork. You see I added the smoked cured pork cause the flavor is more than welcomed and when my father makes the dish theyre is hardly a pork product to be found that doesnt wind up in there. (chorizos, hams, pork peices yadayada).
In fact ive decided this year for the holiday I am going to cure and smoke some pork ribs to present to the family to be used in their holiday rice pots.
post #9 of 15
Man that looks good.. and those are some great pics.!
post #10 of 15
OK.. I love Mexican food.. and I have to try this very soon. Can I find all the ingredients at most local grocery stores? Or do I have to go to the local ethnic store?
post #11 of 15
Sounds like something Daisy Martinez makes on PBS.
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Yes, the two most ethnic ingredients the peas and that little packet of sazon are pretty available nowadays. The two jarred condiment being sofrito and recaito can be made at home with better results than either of the jarred variety. Do a search for the recipes and youll find some good results. The rest is good to go. Man i ecourage you to try it.
post #13 of 15
After thinking about it for a bit.. I'm sure I've had it before.. I go to Mexico every year for vacation.. stay at A/I's and make sure I sample everything to see how I like it. And I've had several pork/rice type things. Just don't know what they were called.

Since you say this is a common dish.. Is it a stretch to assume I've had it before? If I did have it.. I liked it.. but know I can do better.
post #14 of 15
I have made the "hammy ribs" before... most excellent! Only a few days to cure, and cut the cure amount a bit especially if using BB's. Mostly bone. Kinda like doing a cure on poultry. Did a paprika/onion/cumin/Smitty's on them with the cure, then slow/low smoked for 4 hours or so, never topping 150°. Yum!
post #15 of 15
WZ -- Thanks for sharing. This looks great as I like this kind of food a lot.
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