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Smoking wood input???

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone, first off thanks everyone for the help in picking a smoker for my father this X-mas(he loves it,not used it yet,but loves it). My question is this I started a small biz last year called Landfill Lumber, I rescue wood from all sorts of horrible fates, I have access to straight line rips of cherry,maple,oaks from millwoks(so it kiln dried) I was wondering if this wood is of use to smokers? I would think that the thin rips that are about 1/8" thick would work well for soaking in water and using? I see they sell chips,chunks, formed pellets, what is used most commonly? I sell a lot of wood to woodturners and wood workers, just always looking for more ways to keep good wood out of the landfills. Any input would be great, even if its(thats a stupid idea no one pays for smoking wood). When the spring hits I will be trying some jerky in my dads smoker, can't wait. Thanks for everything guys, victor
post #2 of 9
The one thing that I say is wood that has been kilned more then likely has been treated with one chemical or another. I would want to check that out and make sure its not treated. Don't want to use treated lumber for smoking. But if its not treated it might be ok, but I am not an expert either.

post #3 of 9
I ditto Kookie's reply; if treated may be toxic?
post #4 of 9
Hmmm I dunno about the wood being treated. Seems to me it's just dried usually. We went thru this a while back... one sec...
Well, cant find it now, but here's one related http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/for...ead.php?t=9954

But I had done some searching, and I did not read in any instance of hardwoods being treated. Now, some softer woods are, for Wolmanized and such.

I'll see if I can locate some more info.

But I use hardwood cut for flooring/furniture/woodworking all the time.
On edit: Here's a good link from the wood industry, discouraging such treatments. Alot of info there check the "knowledge base" at the end of the article.
post #5 of 9
Good info Richtee. I just meant in my post, that be treated might be something to make sure of first. I was hoping there was some info on it. I just didn't want to see a fellow brother in arms get sick. Sometimes its better to be on the side of caution.

post #6 of 9
USUALLY better to err on the side of caution. Indeed!
post #7 of 9
From my experience in woodworking, kiln dried wood is TOO dry, i'm one of those guy's who use that wood you sell and have tried several type's of specie's for smoking and find that even after soaking, the wood is so dry that it ignite's almost immediately!!
Kiln dried lumber is 12% moisture or less, seasoned firewood is like 30% moisture.........big difference. My $.02 icon_mrgreen.gif
post #8 of 9
Yeah..I usually leave my cuts I pick up outside. Usually in a week or two they pick up enough moisture to not explode into flame in 2 mins.
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 


This is the info . I wanted, kiln dried lumber has no chemicals, its just baked at the end of drying to kill an insects. Quality furniture and trim grade lumber should be no more then 8% moisture so even drier then 12%. I hope to have a portable mill up and going by summer, so when I get any wood that is good for smoking then maybe I'll try to sell some of it. Thanks for the good info. this lets me know that Its not going to work. Thanks, Victor
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