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Turkey- to brine or not to brine

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Planning to smoke a bird for the extended Fam
plan was - 12 to13 lb bird, cavity filled with an orange, 2 apples, celery,& an onion. brush outside with olive oil and a rub in and out (not sure what kind yet) in a pan using indirect heat between 270 and 350 deg. on a brinkman cimmeron with either hickory or apple wood. 3-2-1 depending on size and heat issues.
I've been reading about brines in the SMF, and my plan has given way to the want to experiment. Given the "plan" above and the tempatation to brine then smoke; adding in the desire to have the extended fam be "thankfull" for deciding to spend thanksgiving at my house, I'm not sure which way to go.
Anyone out there with extensive turkey knowledge. I have no first hand experience at brined birds, so I don't know what to expect or what the flavor would be.
post #2 of 18
A "brined" bird will blow away a dry bird any day!! Jsst search Turkey brine, there's been a lot the last few day's alone!
I would also suggest if your gonna set it in a pan, set a rack under it so that skin has a chance to get crispy!!PDT_Armataz_01_29.gif
post #3 of 18
3-2-1 is usually a method for spare ribs, not turkey. Turkey you cook to temperature, a minimum of 165 degrees according to the USDA.

I would suggest a brine, it adds tremendous moisture to the bird.

Lots of different brines out there to try. You can inject as well to add even more flavor.
post #4 of 18
I've been doing turkeys for the last 10 years and have not brined one yet. this year we have orders for 20 so maybe next year i will try brining. We inject with apple cider and gauze them and mop with apple juice smoked over apple wood. Turn out fall off the bone goooooood and moist....................
post #5 of 18
man does this thread look familar........def. on the brining.........this will be my first turkey brined........but i have done chickens and butts........and the moisture is great........plus plan on injecting for the first time....a turkey.......from what i have read and experienced its going to rock

plus if you want soggy skin.........put it in that pan.......you want crisp.......rub mayo all over it..........thats a tip from ajthepoolman.......the pan juices will make the skin soggy

if you want to save drippings......do as bubba suggested.......put the pan UNDER the rack.........let that skin crip up......and, if as aj has shown with his chickens........even at 250, you will get a crisp, not rubbery, skin.........i know i will find out aweek from today.............

good luck

post #6 of 18
I brined the last turkey that I cooked. It was great. Make sure that you buy a minimally processed bird (one that is not brined at the processing plant). There are lots of brine recipes on the web. Find one that matches your, and more importantly, your guest's taste.
Smoking to please,
post #7 of 18
CRAP CRAP CRAP........i just checked my turkey........it sez moisture enhanced.......so now i am screwd?


post #8 of 18
Brining sure helps the Bird, lots of info here
post #9 of 18
Brining poultry is the way to go! Here's a little tutioial on poultry:

post #10 of 18
I've never brined them either, but always used Butterballs which evidently are already brined. I have used other birds and not been as happy, so with this Swift Premium my wife bought, I may try brining it.
post #11 of 18
I typically only do boneless breast when I do turkey. I prefer them brined.
post #12 of 18
Brine away! Even a factory brined bird will benifit from a few more hours in what will undoubtably be a better tasting brine of your own.

I tend to go a little different every time. Depending on my mood, cravings or what is on hand, the swing of the brine will vary from teryaki to garlic to maybe something fruit juice based.

Keep in mind that brining is not the same as injecting, a full bird will need a full night in the brine and the taste will generally be subtle

Also, I boil my brine mixture to leech out and blend the flavors of the components and then cool it in the fridge before soaking the bird in it overnight (or longer)
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

I'm going with the brine

You all have convinced me to try the brine. Found what looks like a good solution on this site - spicy.
Thanks for the links too. Very good information.
I find myself wandering to SMF every time I get on the web. SMOKE INFORMATION OVERLOADbiggrin.gif I love it!!!

Planning on Qing some ribs and butt Sunday. After reading the posts on SMF I can't wait to add some twists to my Q. So put your nose in the air and face Mid MO It's going to be a fine day.

PS Blackhawk19 - Thats a Huey in your pic. I Used to crew them before we got Apache's. Thanks for your service
post #14 of 18
Grrr... them bastages! Don't ^$%& with MY MEAT!
post #15 of 18
LOVE your new avatar rich.........i don't like Mich. OR OSU......since i am a HAWKEYE........GO HAWKEYE"S......but when you two get together i root for the.......what every you guys are.....badgers? oh wait.....wovlerrines.......heheheh.....sorry bout that.........

good luck today

post #16 of 18
By no means do I have extensive knowledge! But after not brining a bird, then brining the next one, I don't even think twice about whether I will brine or not. I will always brine!!!
post #17 of 18
Some other family member is in charge of the turkey for the holiday, so for this weekend I'm going to test brine a chick in a shrimp & crab boil mix. It's only a chick, so if it goes the wrong way... no great loss. Oh BTW, I will be grilling the bird.
post #18 of 18
i feel for ya dude.............i can't smoke till thursday..........but i know you will be going even longer than that..........

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