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Horseradish crop

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Here is what I got out of the ground this year. Should keep me in horseradish for a while. My worries about not leaving enough in the ground to get a plant next year were unfounded. The stuff in the pic was tough to get out, and I left several pencil thick runners in the dirt, mostly because it would have been a pain to get them out.

Think I'm going to make some French Dips tonight to celibrate. icon_mrgreen.gif Thanks for all the advice everyone.

post #2 of 12
Replant the crown, and it will come back. i could only dig mine every 3 years, so i had to rotate in my patch.
post #3 of 12
Looks good Invader Q!
Good luck with the grinding....open a window. lol
post #4 of 12
Looks good and it doesn't get any fresher.
post #5 of 12
Like smokebuzz says, replant the crowns. they are the part with the leaves sprouting out in your pic. My dad has several patches and when digging them he uses the small crowns to replant the area he has just dug and puts the crowns he cuts of while cleaning in another spot which he wants to start another plot. He uses an old blender with a lid which has an opening in the center which you can remove, cutts the root in 1 to 2 inch pieces, puts vinager in the blender, about a cup, and drops in the pieces until the solution gets thick and doesn't want to accept any more root. Takes a wooden spoon and stirs it a couple of times to mix in the large pieces, restarting the blender between stirs. He then dumps it in a large mouth gallon jar, and the whole family helps our selves to his stash when we need a horseradish fix. Good luck.
post #6 of 12
After grinding, the chemicals in the root start a reaction. Heat starts to build almost immediately. At first it is difficult to know how much heat you like and want. Flooding with vinegar stops this process. I have never heard of anyone putting the vinegar in at the same time they grind, unless they want fairly mild horseradish. It seems to me that the grinding, the chemical reaction and the vinegar would work to counter balance each other. It would kill the action immediately. So I grind and time my delay in adding Vinegar. This lets the heat build, but in a somewhat controllable fashion. I usually split my ground root into three parts. I add Vinegar to each portion, after two, four and six minutes, respectively. I end up with mild, medium and hot horseradish.

I know everyone has different ideas and does things different, but this is how I do it, and have for years.

Good luck.. I know you will enjoy the results no matter how you choose to process it.

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone! icon_cool.gif
post #8 of 12
I cut mine into small chunks and take the blender OUTSIDE and chop it until it becomes well chopped. Put just enough vinegar in there to make it a paste. I like to add a pinch of salt to act as a preservative.

DO bring this OUTSIDE or you'll choke the family with the fumes!
post #9 of 12
I just pulled mine out too. Good tip on the crowns!
post #10 of 12

hey every1, imma originally from mich and now in nc for a while now...but anyways my grandpa used to grow horseradish and when he made it.....it was the best better than the stores have for sure.... well imma thinking on trying the growing and making my  own process as well....but the question is can you grow horseradish in north carolina?



hope to here from some1 thankyou    




post #11 of 12

it grows in minnesota!!!

post #12 of 12

It will grow in NC.

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