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Evaluate Brinkmann All-in-one

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I think it would be quite interesting to study reports and evaluations of folks who have used the Brinkmann all-in-one. How do they compare with the more specialized units? Are there any techniques unique to using them? Etc.
post #2 of 10
My all In One works on propane or charcoal. In propane mode it really can kick up the heat, but easy to keep smokin' temps. If your trying to grill with propane, it just does not get hot enough at the grill level, seems better to grill using charcoal. When you have to remove the main body to add wood/charcoal/water it can be dangerous. That is why I use a Smoke Pistol to get the smoke flavoring of wood without having to remove the main body. Once you get used to it, it's not bad. It can't compare with more traditional smokers, but a good starter.
post #3 of 10
I have one. I have only used the propane for BBQ, never tried charcoal. Personally, I don't think this unit is worth the powder to blow it to h**l.mad.gif Like Rich says, you have to lift the whole body off to add chips, and that can get heavy. And I usually don't lift it level, so the beans and creamed corn slop over. Its impossible to keep the temp at 225 unless you install the needle valve from Bayou Classics. I just don't like it. I bought a BBQ Grillware propane and love it. I did have to install the needle valve, but in my opinion, it is 100 times better. icon_biggrin.gif
post #4 of 10
DJDebi has one.........she should be around soon to also add imput

post #5 of 10
This is going to get long - it comes up alot lately so ... I make a little illustrative report and you can download it from my site. I'll post here when it's done.

Okay here it is:


For those of you considering the purchase of or those that haven't quite figured out how to use the All-In-One - ENjoy!
post #6 of 10
Maybe make it a sticky?

just a thought

post #7 of 10
After using one for almost a year (with propane/lava rocks. Never tried charcoal):

The cooking chamber/top part is made of low-grade material. Doesn't keep the heat out well and mine warped. Mentioned this in another post or two. The charcoal/lava rock pan is also not that great of quality. The jet burner, on the other hand, is not bad and the base is extremely solid.

When smoking, it can be a little difficult to keep the temps down low without modifications, but works fine for the most part. Easy to kick up the temps to 300 or so for chicken or what have you. To get to higher temps (such as for grilling), it takes a lot of propane for what it does, and takes a long time to heat up the lava rocks.

Because it uses propane heating lava rocks, there are more factors to consider. When you turn the propane up or down, it won't result in a direct temperature change. The rocks will take some time to cool down or heat up. If you turn the burner down, the temps often continue to rise. This can be a little challenging because you can't adjust the temperature quickly and have to take things a bit more slowly, like cooking with charcoal almost.

But overall, for $80 new (without propane tank), it was a good deal I think, and I still use the jet burner, which was about half the value of the thing. So really, it's like being out maybe $40 for me, which is the price of a normal charcoal ECB. Seems like a pretty good deal to me.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Forgive, but I must confess an ulterior motive in posing the question. I am one who can never leave well enough alone and save all kinds of junk with the hopes of someday using it.

My current wild idea is to make a grill from some spare parts. I have a body...hull(? I don't know the proper nomenclature).... and a couple of 22" grates from a Chinese cheapo-san (CCS ?) kettle grill. I cut a 5" hole in the bottom of it and sat it on a turkey fryer base. I put a 15" ECB grate in the bottom of it and, not having any lava rock on hand, covered it w ceramic briquettes. I put one layer of briquettes, then put a cast iron smoke box in the center of the grill and filled the rest of the area w another layer of ceramic.

I gave all the metal interior a coat of used turkey frying grease and fired it up to burn it in. I set the flame pretty high and let it burn for 30 min. Figuring that I had about all the heat that was forthcoming, I stuck a deep-fryer thermometer thru a vent hole in the top of the lid. 375 degrees. I removed the lid and placed a thermometer on the 22" grate. 250 degrees w the lid removed.

Now...My efforts w a charcoal grill have been consistent failure. My efforts w a Fiesta propane grill have been rewarded, but I consider myself an ignoramus in the grilling arts. Will this thing be usable? I would welcome your comments and suggestions. Bear in mind that I will settle for somewhat less than perfection in order to enjoy the satisfaction of using the sucker.
post #9 of 10
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Unfortunately pics are easier said than done. I don't know how to send the things!
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